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Clearing corrugated plastic pipe

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  • Clearing corrugated plastic pipe

    I have a K-60 drain cleaner and it has always worked fine on all types of regular sewer pipe (i.e. plastic, steel and CI). My question is whether or not it will work in corrugated plastic pipe without tearing up the pipe. I was planning on going in with the spade bit to clear the obstruction which is most likely a combination of small sticks and leaves. I would appreciate any suggestions.

    Thanks

  • #2
    i always tend to use my jetter on any cheap/ junk pipe

    the corrigated pipe is for outside area drains

    chances are a k-60 or any cable machine will tear up this pipe and the stoppage is probably dirt too. a jetter would be my choice

    if you can go in from a downstream opening and run it back into the plugged line would be better. a jetter will not damage the pipe as easy and will flush the pipe properly.

    rick.
    phoebe it is

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    • #3
      elephant trunk

      SDR 35 is required by code for drainage in our area. the flex is junk,
      and outlawed most towns where i work, NO. CA. Tool
      I can build anything You want , if you draw a picture of it , on the back of a big enough check .

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      • #4
        What size line are you trying to clear and with what size cable?

        Mark
        "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

        I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

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        • #5
          Clearing plastic corrugated plastic pipe

          The previous homeowner installed the 4" corr. pipe on the downspouts. He combined two downspouts into one and I doubt that he used a T-Y for the connection. Probably just a straight tee. There is limited flow through the pipe on what I suspect is the run but the bull of the tee is pretty well blocked. I hoped to run my 7/8" line through the run to try to dislodge the blockage while running water down both lines. Unfortunately I do not own a jetter. I'm not a big fan of corrugated and may end up putting the Kubota to use.
          Last edited by dmann54; 04-30-2006, 07:49 AM.

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          • #6
            I don't care for the corrugated pipe but it is commonly used for downspouts and is legal most places I know. The 7/8" cable does not have a bulb aguer and the tools it does have will likely tear a hole in the pipe. You may want to try using the cxable without an end on it and see what happens. Any place where you can't get through or has a straight tee you will probably need to dig up anyways so if you damage it with the cable it doesn't mater. I think your idea of running a bunch of water shoul;d help.

            Good luck-Mark
            "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

            I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

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            • #7
              Originally posted by dmann54
              The previous homeowner installed the 4" corr. pipe on the downspouts. He combined two downspouts into one and I doubt that he used a T-Y for the connection. Probably just a straight tee. There is limited flow through the pipe on what I suspect is the run but the bull of the tee is pretty well blocked. I hoped to run my 7/8" line through the run to try to dislodge the blockage while running water down both lines. Unfortunately I do not own a jetter. I'm not a big fan of corrugated and may end up putting the Kubota to use.
              exactly why i use a jetter on this type of pipe. i won't damage the fittings when yu hit a non directional fitting. also the snake will only bore a hole if lucky. it has no washing affect.

              i run into more area drains that were installed by concete or pool contractors that used cheap styrene pipe under the concrete deck

              had they spent another .25 cents a foot they could have put in sdr35 or a dwv pipe and never have an issue with roots or tees. the issue is that they buy the junk from home depot and thats all they sell. styrene or corrigated pipe. the diy'ers don't know any better. the contractors should.

              good luck and good digging. another nice feature of using a jetter is it gives you an idea of how the pipe runs. as the jetter nozzle enters a drain, a hugh blast of water will blow out of the drain top. this gives you a simple way to trace the piping and wash out the line. in fact my best root cutter is a water powered slow speed spinning nozzle. it's called a warthog
              it also cost $800.

              rick.
              phoebe it is

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              • #8
                I had been on other projects and this issue kind of slid by the wayside. I finally got around to digging out the 7/8 line and had forgotten how open the coil on it was. The line would definitely get caught up in the corrugated pipe if not in the straight certainly in the bends. Soooo it looks like I'll be digging it up and replacing it with what (in my opinion) should have been used the first time. You guys are right, the corrugated is not only cheaper but easier to install. Most people probably don't even bother to make sure the pipe is pitched properly and isn't trapping anything (possibly job security for some less than reputable contractors). Thanks for your comments and it's off to the supply house.

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