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  • Which kind of pex do you prefer?

    I have only used Wirsbo Aquapex. I have seen Vanguard used a lot and by looking at it it seems like it may be an easier material to use. No pumping. No fighting the tool in tight places. No waiting for the pex to shrink back down when cold, etc., etc.

    I would love to read your opinions on this. Thanks.
    One of the best lessons I learned from my father is when he did nothing to help me. I then learned to help my self.

  • #2
    Originally posted by tnoisaw
    I have only used Wirsbo Aquapex. I have seen Vanguard used a lot and by looking at it it seems like it may be an easier material to use. No pumping. No fighting the tool in tight places. No waiting for the pex to shrink back down when cold, etc., etc.

    I would love to read your opinions on this. Thanks.
    For internal water piping (in the walls of a building)? None. Use copper. If you are refering to chemical or process piping, please specify.

    By the way, I am certified for Wisbro Pex piping.
    the dog

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    • #3
      Why?

      Why do you only want to use copper? I have used Wirsbo Aquapex in new construction and remodeling homes for at least eight years with no problems. This isn’t a union thing is it?
      One of the best lessons I learned from my father is when he did nothing to help me. I then learned to help my self.

      Comment


      • #4
        My choice between PEX and copper would almost always be type L hard copper overhead rather than PEX. In areas with aggressive water I am more likely to recommend PEX with PEX fittings over copper. The real reason most builders go with PEX over copper is it takes less skill to install the PEX and as such it is cheaper to install.

        For an old-time plumber to install PEX is like having an artist who switches to paint-by-numbers. To many of us plumbing is still an art.

        Mark
        "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

        I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

        Comment


        • #5
          I still want to know.

          The plumber I started my career with was a third generation plumber. His father was still active in the business (to our dismay, he was a pain in the $&&) and hated pvc and copper. Thank God his son, my boss, was more accepting to the new technologies of pvc and copper (which was not new but was considered untested by his dad). I probably would not have stayed in plumbing if I spent everyday pinging cast iron and threading galvanized pipe for water.

          If I recall right, Aquapex has been used in Europe twenty years longer than here. That sounds like sufficient time to see if a product is good or not and I’m sure we would have heard if the product has had any problems. If not by the media then certainly from attorneys because they would be the first to see dollar signs with litigation's from a bad product.

          I don’t agree with ToUtahNow’s statement “The real reason most builders go with PEX over copper is it takes less skill to install the PEX and as such it is cheaper to install.” This sounds like a union statement.

          Can’t the average dyi guy put together pvc? A mechanically inclined dyi guy could learn to sweat copper. A dyi guy can use cpvc for water too. With Wirsbo Aquapex you still need to know how the material reacts to temperature differences et. As you are am sure aware, the hot side will bend easier than the cold which means more support et, et. Not to mention the other quirks the Aquapex has that if not known, could cause problems.

          I like pex because it is faster to install and has less areas, joints, to go bad. I am not an unskilled laborer who just wants the easy way out. I want to use a product that I feel would not only be beneficial to myself but to my customers also. If I can do a job faster without compromising the quality I will. This will get me to the other jobs that are backing up much faster.

          I would still like to know what pex material everyone prefers. We seem to have gotten off the subject.
          One of the best lessons I learned from my father is when he did nothing to help me. I then learned to help my self.

          Comment


          • #6
            Rehau

            Typically i like to use silver soldered 19g copper. Never a problem.

            The price of copper tube has increased about 60% in the last year here.So to be competitive on new work Pex is a must unless other materials are specified.

            Rehau is the only pex type system I'll use.

            See www.rehau.com.au

            Rehau has different systems available in Australia to the USA.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by tnoisaw

              I don’t agree with ToUtahNow’s statement “The real reason most builders go with PEX over copper is it takes less skill to install the PEX and as such it is cheaper to install.” This sounds like a union statement.
              I started out in a Union shop doing HVAC but I never have worked as a Union plumber. What I do know is I can hire a plumber who is great at PVC and PEX for less than half what I have to pay a plumber who is great at copper and cast iron.

              Mark
              "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

              I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by tnoisaw
                I have only used Wirsbo Aquapex. I have seen Vanguard used a lot and by looking at it it seems like it may be an easier material to use. No pumping. No fighting the tool in tight places. No waiting for the pex to shrink back down when cold, etc., etc.

                I would love to read your opinions on this. Thanks.
                To answer your question:

                I will not use Zurn or Qest piping at all.

                As Australian Plumber Josh noted, I really like Rehau because the piping is much more supple and easy to manage. The first plumbing co. I ever worked for did high production tract housing nearly exclusively and I have personally installed tens of thousands of feet of Rehau pipe. I am unaware of any material problems with either the pipe, rings, or fittings (I would only use brass fittings). The only problem I have ever heard of is improperly crimped rings which usually means it was forgotten. That would be the installer's fault however, and not the system's fault. I am perfectly comfortable with copper or pex but these are the only two options I offer my clients. I charge much more for copper as it is much more labor intensive and costly but I do not have a prefference between the two. I will say that I have made numerous repair calls for copper that had developed pits from corrosion. If you are doing new residential construction, which I no longer do, in my opinion, I would not want to put anything but pex in a slab house, so in this case I definately do have a preference.

                I think Watts has also recently, or at least I only recently became aware of it, begun to produce pex pipe. I have tried it and it seems to be very user friendly also.

                I do not care for Vanguard. It's nice to be able to carry it around on that spool but it seems to be more expensive (probably because of the spool) and it is not nearly as flexible as the others. The times that I have used Vanguard I have had some trouble getting it to obey me.

                Wiersbo is a very good system but more expensive and much more labor intensive compared to any crimp system. I keep Wiersbo expander on my truck but rarely use it.

                I have had my own concerns about pex, mostly due to the similarity in appearance to polybutylene systems. Here's the thing though, I did google search on polybutylene lawsuits and got about a gazillion listings, I did a google search on polyethylene lawsuits and got nothing. This product has been around for a long time, if there were problems I'm thinking we would know it by now. In some ways it is inferior to copper. In some ways it is superior to copper. I am at home with either but adjust my price accordingly.

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                • #9
                  Thanks for the information. I’ll have to look into the others. I thought it looked easier to install. Which is not a bad thing.
                  One of the best lessons I learned from my father is when he did nothing to help me. I then learned to help my self.

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