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  • New Angle Stops

    Brasscraft has introduced a new line of angle stops with nipples that I find interesting. If they become approved and workout I see them as a time saver on large jobs. What do you think:


    http://www.brasscraft.com/Default.as...=Whatsnew.aspx
    the dog

  • #2
    I like I like FAST only problem i see is the plastic caps for the stubouts that come already on will be damage quickly and potetial for water damage the cabinet guys down in Texas are rough and rowdy. or opportunity BACKCHARGE great tread

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    • #3
      dog, a few problems i see.

      the stub outs are installed during ruff in. this mens that you will need to know the finish wall depth to allow for a clean flush to the wall finish.

      another issue is that the rely on an o-ring to seal to the pipe. it's sort of like a jon-guess fitting.

      lastly, the coper stub fitting is going to be $$$.

      when i did new construction back in the days, i would always stay away from the gimmicks. prior to the new style ball valve 1/4 turn angle stops of today, there was a 1/4 turn angel stop that use a proprierty rubber compound and didn't require a packing nut. i was smart enough to turn them down for our shop. today everytime i go to shut one of those style, they leak. if only i can find the sales rep from 15 years ago and tell him i told you so.

      don't see a need for them in the service sector.

      by the way, the regular style compression angel stops, i was able to install 400 of them a day and still walk the floors to check for leaks. this 400 was assuming the counter tops were not in yet

      rick.

      ps. why not just install a shark bite male adapter onto an ips angle stop and slide it onto a copper stub out. i'm sure it will be more cost effective.
      phoebe it is

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      • #4
        Rick,

        I agree with your concerns, I wouldn't think of using them without further testing, but I like the concept.


        Now................about you installing 400 angle stops per day. Are you saying that you cut, drained, reamed, and installed 400 angle stops in an 8 hour day?

        Yea, I supposed you also used to carry two cast iron tubs at a time up ten flights of stairs, soldered with a torch in each hand, never had a leak, threaded four inch pipe with a file, casted your own cast iron on the job, and walked to and from school up-hill both ways.

        Since you live in the west, I place you in the great tradition of tall tale tellers.
        the dog

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        • #5
          LOL! Great, I just sprayed coke out my nose onto my keyboard!

          Thanks a lot, Dog!

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by plumbdog10
            Rick,

            I agree with your concerns, I wouldn't think of using them without further testing, but I like the concept.


            Now................about you installing 400 angle stops per day. Are you saying that you cut, drained, reamed, and installed 400 angle stops in an 8 hour day? yes this is correct. remember no counter tops and if the cabinets had no backing, i would install the angle stops before the cabinets were in. keep in mind that draining the building was as easy shutting off the main in the sub-terranian garage and starting from the top floor (3rd or 4th.) i would distribute the estucians and angle stops to the units. typically 1- 3 way a/s. and 2 washing machine valves, 2 toilets, 2-3 lavs and a cold kitchen stop. so this equals 10-12 valves per unit. 40 units in a day and filling up the system to check for leaks or valves that got turned on by the painters remember this is production work and 15 years of it, i got fast. not to mention some very special ratcheting wrenches. i would wear the skin thin on my knuckles.

            Yea, I supposed you also used to carry two cast iron tubs at a time up ten flights of stairs, soldered with a torch in each hand, never had a leak, threaded four inch pipe with a file, casted your own cast iron on the job, and walked to and from school up-hill both ways. no, but i did carry 40 gallon heaters up 4 flights of stairs. we had 1 large scale builder that insisted on individual water heaters. i still do it but not in a production setting. 100 gallon heaters install by myself. 75 gallon heaters into basements myself. trenchless pipebursting just me and my wife. and so on.
            i'm sure over the years you came up with ways to do things faster and better than others. since i work by myself, i have come up with ways to do things that would take 3 people to do. yesterday i had a 50 gallon heater in a basement with steps that droped straight down. very simple. attach an electric winch to the door jamb and you're done with no help.

            Since you live in the west, I place you in the great tradition of tall tale tellers.
            this is not fishing.

            want to race. i'll even give you a head start.

            rick.
            phoebe it is

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