Announcement Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.
ridgid 18V combo set Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • ridgid 18V combo set

    I recieved the 18 volt combo set with the hammer drill, Flashlight( Super light) circular saw and the side impact wrench for a gift in April. I am a Farmer,& a Contractor for trade. I use my drill all the tiime along with the saw for light work. I also bought me a extra battery so That gives me 3 18 volt batteries and 1-smaller 12 volt battery. I do live in Hott Atlanta. here but now even in the cold fall we are having. My batteries will not charge after I use them for 30 minutes to 1 hour later sometimes. I thought I read in the manual that hot batteries will not charge but this is a real pain. because I have 3- 18 volt batteries and I have to go and get a corded drill some times to finish my work because the batteries cannot chARge. Now sometimes maybe 20% of the time I do not have this problem. But 80% of the time it is bad for me. Do I have a "lemon" here or is this normal.?

  • #2
    Normally after heavy use you should let a battery cool for about 1/2 hour before trying to charge it. I might add that it's wise to let a battery cool down before using it again.

    Comment


    • #3
      On the real hot days you may need to put the charger in a cooler with some of the Gel type ice packs (no water type ice). especially if you use the tools hard from full charge to dead. If you don't put the charger in the cooler dropping the battery in for 20min will get the battery temp down and allow the charge cycle to start

      Comment


      • #4
        wbrooks: I believe you mentioned this before earlier this year (spring or early summer). Anyway, I remembered it when building a 30' handicap ramp at my MIL's back when the temps were hitting 100, (heat index hit 113). I threw my old DeWalt 12v's in the cooler as I ran them down before charging them, and it greatly improved their performance. Thanks for the tip, it really works! (The cool water and damp towels on the back of my neck from the cooler helped my performance, too!!)
        Sorry about the delay on the Thank You but I had forgotten who mentioned it

        Go
        Practicing at practical wood working

        Comment


        • #5
          Thanks I understand. But should this be happening now in the cool fall Air when Temps are in the 50's here in Ga.? Your suggestions will really help me next summer.

          Comment


          • #6
            Do the same thing when hitting 'em hard.

            Do the same thing with batteries when running through them quick...like when chasing in hundreds of screws on a deck project. As soon as a battery is drained I put it on a shelf in the refrigerator. When I didn't do this I found the battery wouldn't take anything close to a full charge. I've done this with Bosch, B&D, Ryobi and Dewalt batteries. Never had any ill effects from doing this.

            Comment


            • #7
              red-hot -
              The weather doesn't matter that much in this situation. The chargers apparently have a heat sensor built into the electronics so that when the batt is over a certain temp it won't charge until below the set temp. As others have suggested, by cooling the batt down first it will then charge faster then waiting for the charger fan to cool it down. As a side note I have 9 batts and the same thing happens, hot bat - no charge. I use the fridge/freezer method when-ever available.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by House-Medic View Post
                red-hot -
                .....The chargers apparently have a heat sensor built into the electronics so that when the batt is over a certain temp it won't charge until below the set temp......
                Might even throw the charger itself into the frig. Never had to resort to that...but it might help.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Its normal for batteries to require some cooling before charging if they get really hot. Its more common with tools that drain them really fast. I have dewalt cordless tools and they usually don't have hot delay except with the reciprocating saw. Every time I use it the charger holds it about 30 extra minutes before it starts charging. Some chargers have fans to assist cooling. However, I would avoid force cooling the batteries in a cooler or fridge. That will cool them unevenly and too suddenly which is not good. It will likely shorten the lifespan or totally ruin the battery.
                  Last edited by Velosapien; 11-08-2006, 05:05 PM.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Velosapien View Post
                    However, I would avoid force cooling the batteries in a cooler or fridge. That will cool them unevenly and too suddenly which is not good. It will likely shorten the lifespan or totally ruin the battery.
                    Actually, heat is the big killer of batteries. Force cooling will most likely help the life of the battery. Better still if you could keep it cool while using it. This is the technology behind Bosch's "BlueCore" and why you see vents on many batteries.

                    My only concern with "force cooling" is overcooling in humid environments. You risk condensation forming on the battery when you pull them out of the fridge. Wet+Battery spells trouble. This can be avoided by not leaving them in too long. The ideal thing would be if you could charge them inside the refrigerator! :-)
                    Last edited by Disaster; 11-08-2006, 07:02 PM.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      The thing is heat from typical use is usually well within the operating range of the battery as far as heat damage goes. Normally that should not be a problem unless the battery is getting seriously overworked, in which case force cooling is definately a bad idea if you hope for you batteries to last. Actively passing cool air past the cells like Bosch does is a good idea because it helps radiate a little of the heat away like a heatsink at a slower, more controled rate. The battery can only get as cool as the air that passes through so thats not a problem unless you work in freezing weather (at which point the batteries would not operate well anyway). The problem with sticking it in a cooler right after use is that they will cool way too fast and unevenly. Kind of like putting a grill all the way up and sticking a burger in it. It will burn outside and stay raw inside, just reversed. The inside of the cells will be way hotter than the outside as they cool and that's whats potentially damaging. Every battery maker I've seen advices agaisnt it. Also, if you let it cool too much the battery will not take a full charge. Some chargers have a cold delay so the battery will not charge until it hits operating room temps. Kind of makes it pointless to over cool the battery to speed charging up. One thing that can help is storing a charged battery that was already at room temp in a cooler (not freezing!). For many NiCad batteries they will hold up to 90% of their charge for extended periods instead of being drained in a couple of days/weeks. As you mentioned you still need to be carefull because condensation can short it out. After the rash of shorted exploding Li-Ion laptop batteries lately I'd be especially wary of this!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Battery Problem Too

                        Hi!

                        I've recently aquired an 18V RIDGID combo set, and seem to have the same problem red-hot-farmer had...

                        We use the Reciprocating Saw to cut out crates for easier handling when empty. The problem is we had a LOT of them, so after making sure the batteries were fully operational, I started with the cutting...

                        10 minutes into it, battery 1 is VERY HOT, and dies on me... Weird, but fine, switch to battery 2, 10 more minutes and presto, battery hot & dead... Now I'm wondering if I made a good purchase, since I get 20 minutes of work done, but I need to wait roughly 1 hour to fully recharge both batteries...

                        If you're inquiring about the weather, I live in Trois-Rivières, Qc, Canada, and it was roughly 35 F outside and sunny. Why are the batteries not giving me the expected workload?

                        Frustrated power tool user...

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          That definately sounds like a problem you have there.....a wiring problem of some sort for sure.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I wouldn't say you have bad batteries, My experience shows that for some reason sawzalls seem to use the most power and use up batteries the fastest. Mine do the same. Thats why I bought extra batts.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by INTERCLOTURES View Post
                              Hi!
                              We use the Reciprocating Saw to cut out crates for easier handling when empty. The problem is we had a LOT of them, so after making sure the batteries were fully operational, I started with the cutting...

                              10 minutes into it, battery 1 is VERY HOT, and dies on me... Weird, but fine, switch to battery 2, 10 more minutes and presto, battery hot & dead... Now I'm wondering if I made a good purchase, since I get 20 minutes of work done, but I need to wait roughly 1 hour to fully recharge both batteries...

                              Frustrated power tool user...
                              If you bought the older 18V set (922 or 923) it only comes with 1.9AmpHr batteriy. This is a little low compared to the competition. For example the M-brand Sawzall has a 2.4AmpHr battery. The newer set (9213 or 9223) comes with 2.5Amp batteries.

                              Additionally, the batteries will not develop their full potential till 4-6 charge cycles (this helps break up the crystals and break in the batteries.)

                              You might expect 20% better performance...say 12 minutes, once the batteries are fully conditioned and maybe 15 to 17 minutes if you stepped up to the 2.5AmpHr batteries.

                              For constant work, without much pausing, that is reasonably what you can expect from NiCd battery powered reciprocating saw. You could expect a little more runtime from the 24V Lithium Ion Ridgid or similarly from Competitive brands with Lithium Ion batteries.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X