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  • #46
    Originally posted by Disaster View Post
    That is a sweet little drill and impact gun. 3.5lbs yet 3AmpHr battery. I wonder if the little 14.4V Makita LiIon drill I saw at HD was the same one with a wimpy 1.5AmpHr battery? I also like that it comes with a 1/2 inch chuck which some of the other lighter drills lack. The power/weight/size ratio is better than the Panasonic. I'll keep my eye out for it to arrive around here.

    http://www.makita.co.jp/global/produ...40/bdf440.html

    In the U.S. I can seem to find the older 2.6AmpHr NiMh set for a good price ($217) and the lone impact wrench in LiIon for $299...but not the set like you have.



    http://www.amazon.com/Makita-BTD130F...3?ie=UTF8&s=hi
    I just recently got the white makita with the 1.5 ah batteries. It also brings a new rapid charger which makita will be using to replace all the Li-ion/Ni-MH chargers in all their products soon. It charges the 3.0 ah batteries in 22 minutes and the 1.5 ah in 15 minutes. The standard charger does 45/30 min respectively. I bought it mainly to use as a woodworking drill becuase its so small and powerfull where extra long battery life isn't as important. Besides, it charges in 15 minutes so the other battery will be ready long before you need it. It also takes the 3.0ah batteries increasing its weight to 3.9 lbs. Even with the 1.5 ah batteries the battery life is remarkably good. Almost comparable to my NiCD tools. I haven't really given it a hard trial yet but I have yet to run out of charge in the middle of a project.

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    • #47
      Originally posted by Velosapien View Post
      I just recently got the white makita with the 1.5 ah batteries......It also takes the 3.0ah batteries increasing its weight to 3.9 lbs.

      Interesting...so do you think this is different than the compact one they sell in Canada and the UK that is advertised to weigh 3.7lb with the 3AmpHr battery?
      Last edited by Disaster; 11-16-2006, 10:58 AM.

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      • #48
        By the way, where did you buy that set for $399?

        Originally posted by dsydorko View Post
        ....bought this set:
        http://www.makita.ca/index.cfm?event=tool&id=8
        came with a bonus xenon worklight, but a bag instead of the hard case, for CA$399 (about US$350)
        By the way, where did you buy that set for $399? I live on the border with Canada and occasionally road trip there.

        Comment


        • #49
          The Makita Drill/Impact Set

          Originally posted by Disaster View Post
          By the way, where did you buy that set for $399? I live on the border with Canada and occasionally road trip there.
          I got it at Home Hardware. They do have stores across Canada I believe- looks like your closest to Ontario, I'm out west

          www.homehardware.ca
          it's on page 8 I think of this weeks flyer, they show it online. You can use this postal code to access the flyer when it prompts for one- T2G4R8

          I really don't think this is the same as the white tools or any of the 62XX or 63XX models. But it has some pretty good features like the new 4 point motor and the user replaceable motor brushes, I'm surprised the little drill has a 1/2" chuck, the LED lights might prove to be handy occasionally, with the 3.0 Ah batteries runtime I hear is incredible, still 329 ft/lbs of torque on the drill, 1240 in/lbs on the impact, and I really like the features on the charger, although it's not the rapid one it is a 45 minute charge on these batteries and it's a really smart charger- with cooling fan, trickle/maintenance mode, conditioning cycle. I don't know if all Makita tools are made in Japan- but these say it right on them and I'm content with that as opposed to Malaysia, Taiwan, etc. They managed to get that low weight without resorting to too much plastic from what I can tell- still steel inside where it counts the most. My only complaints are (there's always something right?) short warranty (1 year); the clutch ring is small and the LED overlaps the bottom of it and it is kinda awkward to adjust even for a guy with smaller hands, but I guess sacrifices like this have to be made to make it so compact; and there's no bit holder on either tool (though I think you can add one from Makita); aside from the bag and the flashlight there was nothing else but a double ended phillips bit- a bit stingy with the little extras but oh well.
          Last edited by dsydorko; 11-16-2006, 12:11 PM.

          Comment


          • #50
            Originally posted by dsydorko View Post
            I got it at Home Hardware. They do have stores across Canada I believe- looks like your closest to Ontario, I'm out west

            www.homehardware.ca
            it's on page 8 I think of this weeks flyer, they show it online. You can use this postal code to access the flyer when it prompts for one- T2G4R8
            .
            Found it, thanks. Yes, I live outside Detroit, right across the border from Windsor, Ontario. It is about a half hour drive from my office to the border...maybe 45 minutes to the nearest Home Hardware, if you include bridge and customs time. I'm vacillating between this one and the little LXT201 18V kit...which I also can't find in the U.S....or maybe just go for the BDF452HW with the 1.5AmpHr batteries and the quick charger......decisions!!!
            Last edited by Disaster; 11-17-2006, 03:04 AM.

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            • #51
              Originally posted by Disaster View Post
              Interesting...so do you think this is different than the compact one they sell in Canada and the UK that is advertised to weigh 3.7lb with the 3AmpHr battery?
              Its more powerfull. Its a little longer, the clutch ring is bigger and very easy to handle. Thats probably because its essentially a scaled down BDP451 which is the big high end model. Internally it looks like its virtually identical. Main change is the two speed transmission that is more compact and has different gear ratio's.

              The white models are intended as Makita's value line while the blue is the professional line. The 1.5 ah batteries, which are really the main difference, make the unit substantially cheaper. The advantage is the small batteries are REALLY light and small. For jobs that don't require excessive run time they are incredibly useful. Also, the white models can take the larger 3.0 ah batteries but the blue 18v models have stub that prevents the compact battery pack from sliding in. The compact battery has the slides on both sides the same size. The 3.0ah battery has the left slide cut a little lower than the right to clear the small stub on the power tool end. Far as I can tell there's no reason for the compact battery to not work on the blue drills. They are identical in every other respect. They would just last less. Makita just did this to differentiate the product. I'm considering cutting the stub off to be able to use the compact batteries on the impact driver. I suspect they don't want people to do this because it will compete and make tools like the impact even smaller and lighter than the smaller 14.4 model they will be releasing soon.

              Its hard to tell but the really tiny model dsydorko got looks like it will only be released as a 14.4v unit in the US and Canada. Looks like Japan is the only one to get the 18v version so far.

              Comment


              • #52
                Originally posted by Velosapien View Post
                ....but the blue 18v models have stub that prevents the compact battery pack from sliding in..........Far as I can tell there's no reason for the compact battery to not work on the blue drills.

                Not sure about this, but there can be huge differences in a batteriy's max current capability.

                I have a little RC experience and Lithium Ion cells are starting to take off there...previously, NiCd was king. Lithium Ion cells are rated not only for AmpHrs (capacity) but also max. current. If you buy a battery that isn't rated high enough in current, and then try to draw too much load from it, it can overheat...destroy internal leads...etc. Perhaps the 1.5AmpHr battery can't provide the current draw required of the larger tool.

                Comment


                • #53
                  Originally posted by Disaster View Post
                  Not sure about this, but there can be huge differences in a batteriy's max current capability.

                  I have a little RC experience and Lithium Ion cells are starting to take off there...previously, NiCd was king. Lithium Ion cells are rated not only for AmpHrs (capacity) but also max. current. If you buy a battery that isn't rated high enough in current, and then try to draw too much load from it, it can overheat...destroy internal leads...etc. Perhaps the 1.5AmpHr battery can't provide the current draw required of the larger tool.
                  I would normally accept this except that as far as I can tell the internals of the compact drill are the same as the blue one. There's no difference in power draw. Even the flashlight wont take the compact batteries. I doubt there's a technical reason reason behing that decision. Anyway, I might be willing to take the chance at the expense of a compact battery, they are not as expensive to replace

                  Comment


                  • #54
                    Decisions

                    Originally posted by Disaster View Post
                    Found it, thanks. Yes, I live outside Detroit, right across the border from Windsor, Ontario. It is about a half hour drive from my office to the border...maybe 45 minutes to the nearest Home Hardware, if you include bridge and customs time. I'm vacillating between this one and the little LXT201 18V kit...which I also can't find in the U.S....or maybe just go for the BDF452HW with the 1.5AmpHr batteries and the quick charger......decisions!!!
                    Well, if you bought them in Canada I guess you'd want to take them out of the box and hide the receipt, maybe throw a little dirt on the bag to make it look used. Not sure, but if you declared them at customs you might have to pay some duty since they are made in Japan- not NAFTA exempt.
                    I didn't see the 18V (LXT201) kit at my local home hardware, or anywhere else for that matter, but if you find that one for a decent price that might be the way to go. They're still really light, and you'll never have to fear showing up at a jobsite and being heckled about your girly tools. With my 14.4V set I'm sure the boys'd be calling the makita bag my purse. The bag is huge actually, but the tools look more like a travel size hair dryer than a serious power tool. Even if I found the LXT201 set I couldn't justify the extra cost- the 14.4s were already stretching the budget too far as it was.
                    I used the impact last night for the first time on a little HVAC home improvement job and so far I love it, so easy to control. Standing on a ladder holding it above my head and at a weird angle, it was no problem and without struggling against the weight I was able to concentrate on the trigger pressure and drilling angle which made the work go smoothly.
                    On another note, I just picked up the Taunton's 2007 Tool Guide and there was a 14.4V cordless drill comparison there. The Milwaukee was the best overall pick of the readers and the editor. The readers picks had the Milwaukee followed by Bosch, Porter Cable (which the Editor picked as the best value), Dewalt, Makita (6337DWDE) and the Ridgid was at the bottom, only ahead of the Craftsman and Skil models tested. When I read the editors comments on the Ridgid it made me think that it would have won the best value choice if it wasn't for the weight. They complained about it being too heavy for many woodworking tasks. All the drills tested hovered between 5lbs and 5.8lbs and then there's the clunky Ridgid at 6.3lbs in a weight class of its own. I know that this is a woodworking mag, but even for construction workers does the extra weight do anything positive for them? (you can't say it means its more durable- reputable brands like Milwaukee, Bosch and Dewalt are still notably lighter). I wonder what would have happened if they tested the R83001 instead (lighter than the X2 version). For weight alone, the fairer comparison would be between a Ridgid X2 and the Dewalt XRP of the same voltage. They tested the DW983K-2.

                    Comment


                    • #55
                      Thanks for the tips.

                      Originally posted by dsydorko View Post
                      Well, if you bought them in Canada I guess you'd want to take them out of the box and hide the receipt, maybe throw a little dirt on the bag to make it look used. Not sure, but if you declared them at customs you might have to pay some duty since they are made in Japan- not NAFTA exempt.

                      ....I just picked up the Taunton's 2007 Tool Guide and there was a 14.4V cordless drill comparison there. The Milwaukee was the best overall pick of the readers and the editor. The readers picks had the Milwaukee followed by Bosch, Porter Cable (which the Editor picked as the best value), Dewalt, Makita (6337DWDE) and the Ridgid was at the bottom, only ahead of the Craftsman and Skil models tested. When I read the editors comments on the Ridgid it made me think that it would have won the best value choice if it wasn't for the weight. They complained about it being too heavy for many woodworking tasks. All the drills tested hovered between 5lbs and 5.8lbs and then there's the clunky Ridgid at 6.3lbs in a weight class of its own. I know that this is a woodworking mag, but even for construction workers does the extra weight do anything positive for them? (you can't say it means its more durable- reputable brands like Milwaukee, Bosch and Dewalt are still notably lighter). I wonder what would have happened if they tested the R83001 instead (lighter than the X2 version). For weight alone, the fairer comparison would be between a Ridgid X2 and the Dewalt XRP of the same voltage. They tested the DW983K-2.
                      Can't recall how the whole duty thing works. Can bring back so much in value as long as I'm there for long enough time.....

                      Surprised the Makita didn't fair better....but they didn't test the real light one, did they. I love the heft of the Ridgid when I pick it up and the authority of how it powers through wood....but I find I use it less and less often because it is just too much for most of the jobs I do around the house.

                      The last few jobs I did were, hanging bathroom fixtures (small hole...screwdriving), installing a door bell (3/4 inch hole...driving), changing the oil on my Volvo (removing half a dozen 10mm fasterners from the lower engine cover) and finally rotating the tires (19mm wheelnuts.)

                      I only used my Ridgid set for the 10mm nuts...used the right angle 12V impact. For the other jobs I used a much lighter Ryobi OnePlus drill and for the wheelnuts I used a GoodYear/PepBoys 24 volt impact gun which for it's 2200inlbs of torque and only cost $80.

                      I think I...and my wife...would find it way more handy to have a small drill in the drawer that would always have charged batteries. My wife would never consider handling the 8lb Ridgid drill and unfortunately, the Ryobi requires planning to "condition" the batteries for a job.

                      Thanks again for the update and tips.
                      Last edited by Disaster; 11-17-2006, 01:54 PM.

                      Comment


                      • #56
                        You are probably right.

                        Originally posted by Velosapien View Post
                        I would normally accept this except that as far as I can tell the internals of the compact drill are the same as the blue one. There's no difference in power draw. Even the flashlight wont take the compact batteries. I doubt there's a technical reason reason behing that decision. Anyway, I might be willing to take the chance at the expense of a compact battery, they are not as expensive to replace

                        You are probably right...unless the motor is smaller on the smaller drill I'd suspect it is some silly marketing thing.

                        Comment


                        • #57
                          Well curiosity got the best of me as usual. I cut the little tab off the tools and tested the compact batteries on the standard Makita Li-Ion tools. They work just fine as imagined. The impact driver now weighs a staggering 2.9 lbs . It was interesting that according to makita the flashlight lasts 4.3 hours on the 3 ah batteries. I was working outdoors late last night so I used the flashlight continuosly and got a solid 4 hours out of the compact 1.5ah battery. I havent really given the compact drill a good workout yet but I drove about 100 1 5/8 screws last night plus a few holes. Put the battery in the charger when done and it was topped of in less than one minute so i guees it hardly broke a sweat with the use it got. Definately a good choice if looking for a drill to use when you don't want to break out the hefty full size drill. I'll need to see how the compact batteries fare on heavier stuff like the hammer drill.

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