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  • 24v Li

    Why do you call is 24V when it's really closer to 22Volts?

  • #2
    wow 2 posts so far and both are on the rather rude side hummm maybe you should get the book "how to make friends and influence people"
    9/11/01, never forget.

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    • #3
      Im not trying to be rude at all, i was just rubbed the wrong way recently by a rather large purchase i made with Ridgid and I am having all kinds of problems. I really didn't mean to sound rude at all, just asking questions

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      • #4
        ok i can under stand that i also sent you a "pm" and welcome to the fourm i can not help with this question but you will get some help here pertty soon
        9/11/01, never forget.

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        • #5
          thank you I appreciate it!

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          • #6
            Probably has to do with battery "equivalence" rating.

            Originally posted by stwwr10 View Post
            Why do you call is 24V when it's really closer to 22Volts?
            Somewhere between 14.4v and 18v cordless batteries began to "cheat" on their voltages and use a mostly charged voltage vs. the flat part of the curve voltage to rate battery packs. In the older standard each NiCad cell was rated at 1.2v which was based on the flat part of the voltage curve. With this logic would suggest a 18v pack should have 15 cells. In fact, they have 14. Likewise the 24v packs I have dissassembled had 19 cells vs. the 20 they should have. If you are putting a Lithium Ion up against a 19 cell, 22.8v pack, you would use 6 cells for about 22 volts.

            This isn't so different from what monitor manufacturers were first doing with LCD's. They were using CRT "equivalance" numbers knowing full well that a 27" CRT actually only had only about 25.5 inches of real screen. This caused a lot of confusion and eventually companies adopted a new standard based on the actual screen size.

            Having said that you should be much less fixated on the voltage and more on the function...torque, runtime..etc. In those measurements the Lithium Ion tools really stand out.
            Last edited by Disaster; 12-06-2006, 05:42 PM.

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            • #7
              So are you saying that Lithium Ion = More Power or more Torque?

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              • #8
                Neither more power, or more torque than NiCad.

                Originally posted by stwwr10 View Post
                So are you saying that Lithium Ion = More Power or more Torque?
                Neither more power, or more torque than NiCad.

                That was my point. Voltage, battery type...aren't going to tell you a lot on how a tool functions. For that, look at the specs and reviews. Torque is important, but generally you aren't going to need much more than 250-300in-lb which most drills will deliver. The 18v Ridgid drill delivers 585in-lb while the 24v drill delivers 615in-lb...note the difference is much smaller than the difference in voltage.

                What Lithium-Ion brings to the table is improved battery life and convenience. You can top of the Lithium-Ion tool anytime and know that when you pick it up it will have nearly a full charge. Not so with a NiCad.
                Last edited by Disaster; 12-06-2006, 06:50 PM.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by stwwr10 View Post
                  So are you saying that Lithium Ion = More Power or more Torque?
                  Not exactly. Some Li-Ion tools have more power than comparable tools because you can make higher power batteries at the same or less weight and size than traditional NiCD tools. NiCD becomes very impractical past the 18v range because the batteries get too large and heavy. Thats why you'll find Li-Ion is now becoming popular in high power tools such as 24v, 28v, and 36v. You will find very limited selection of 24v NiCD tools and they are very heavy. So in that sense yes, Li-Ion can equal more power because its more practical to make them in high capacity sizes. Compring equal voltages though there is no difference. 18v is 18v. The advantage you'll find with Li-Ion is that for the same voltage the battery is substantially lighter. They loose only a very small amount over each month, like 5%. NiCD losses about 20% the first 24 hours and about 1% every day after. That means NiCD basically needs to be charged before use. Li-Ion has about double the run time and the most important part is has much less voltage drop off. NiCD starts to drop as soon as its used. That means as soon as you fire it up the tool instantly start loosing power little by little until its impracticale to keep running at reduced power, even if the battery has charge left. Li-Ion can deliver almost consistant performance with minimal power drop almost all the way to the end of the charge.

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                  • #10
                    So does giving the drill so much Torque slow it down considerably? I know they work inversly so how does that much torque effect the overall performance?

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                    • #11
                      ....all things being equal, more torque equals less speed.

                      Originally posted by stwwr10 View Post
                      So does giving the drill so much Torque slow it down considerably? I know they work inversly so how does that much torque effect the overall performance?
                      You can generate nearly any torque...given enough gearing, but it is at the expense of speed. The industry has adopted a new rating system based on power which is much more informative. I've only seen DeWalt pushing it so far...and unfortunately it has been an uphill battle for them.

                      http://www.dewalt.com/us/cordless/powerrating/?p=5

                      Note the "necessary" torque to get a job done. After you gear lower than that, you are just slowing a tool down.

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                      • #12
                        So why make drills that are 550 in lbs of torque when you are sacrificing speed

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                        • #13
                          Not all drills with plus 500 in lbs of torque are sacrificing speed.

                          Originally posted by stwwr10 View Post
                          So why make drills that are 550 in lbs of torque when you are sacrificing speed
                          First lets be clear...not all drills with plus 500 in lbs of torque are sacrificing speed for power. It is a bit more complicated than that.

                          Customers have been sucked into the torque race and so torque has become a marketing tool. If you are a manufacturer with a cheaper, less powerful motor, you can cheat by gearing it way down.

                          As far as a requirement for torque...it is nice to have a little in reserve for those tough jobs or instances...like when you hit a knot while drilling with a spade bit. Generally, you aren't going to need...or notice more torque than 300-350 in lbs...that is, until the drill catches and breaks your wrist or spins out of your hand. For really high torque applications it is safer and easier to go with an impact gun.

                          I do 99% of my drilling with a 200 in lb drill because it is 4 lbs and more comfortable to haul around. The Ridgid 24 volt 8 lb beast comes out for the bigger jobs....in torque requirement and in time...like if I'm going to be drilling 100's of holes.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by stwwr10 View Post
                            So why make drills that are 550 in lbs of torque when you are sacrificing speed
                            Thats sort of why torque ratings are pretty useless and mainly marketing. There really aren't many jobs that require so much torque from a drill. The drill is also extremely difficult to control and could literally break your rist. An impact wrench is really the way to go at that point. The higher practical speeds used most of the time have much less torque than the rated maximum.

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                            • #15
                              When you need some real power, get out the big beast drill. Please see link for picture.
                              Attached Files

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