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  • Stand included w/ your 12" Mitre saw?

    I just purchased a MS1250LZ 12" mitre saw with lazer, which is still in the shrinkwrap. I noticed that Home Depot is running a ad for this saw WITH stand. My box does not mention a stand under included items. I checked on Ridgid.com and the specs call out a stand included.
    Is this actually included or are the newer models shipping with a stand?

  • #2
    According to the web page it,
    Includes
    MS1250 Miter Saw; Exactline laser disc; table extension; carbide tipped blade; leg stand; work clamp; dust bag; dust guide; wrench; operator's manual
    Teach your kids about taxes..........eat 30 percent of their ice cream.

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    • #3
      My MS1250LZ came with a stand when I bought it earlier this year. It was in the box...cannot imagine it not being in the box.
      Little River Bed and Breakfast, Peterborough NH

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      • #4
        Someone at my store pointed this out to me also. Some have it some dont. The guy I talked to said he saw the same saw with another accessory (dont remember what) at a different location

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        • #5
          You have to watch the sale "deals" carefully. Each chain makes its own deals with the tool makers. What you get for the same price may differ greatly. I have read claims recently made on forums that these deals may also include a difference in the quality of the parts used, including interior parts that can't be seen. Many special deal boxes have a model "subcode" for the contents that is different from the standard code.

          You could check inside your box (depending on the return policy where you bought it) to see if the table is there if that is important to you.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Don Bullock View Post
            You have to watch the sale "deals" carefully. Each chain makes its own deals with the tool makers. What you get for the same price may differ greatly. I have read claims recently made on forums that these deals may also include a difference in the quality of the parts used, including interior parts that can't be seen. Many special deal boxes have a model "subcode" for the contents that is different from the standard code.

            You could check inside your box (depending on the return policy where you bought it) to see if the table is there if that is important to you.
            One that stands out to me was a Ryobi TS I had been very interested in. The price was reasonable but was getting rave reviews from owners and trade magazines (even reviewers who said they were skeptical at first).

            Anyway, apparently one of the things reviewers were raving about was that it came with a Freud blade. HD's model was the same model number but came with a Chinese made blade standard instead...perfect example of what Don is saying. When HD forces a supplier to keep its prices down the supplier has to reduce costs any way they can to be able to keep making a profit!
            Little River Bed and Breakfast, Peterborough NH

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            • #7
              Doggy (and anyone else),

              You're talking about the Ryobi model BT3100 which used to come with a Ryobi-branded (but made in Italy, by Freud) blade. This saw is no-longer made for Home Depot, and with rare exception was "cleared" from inventory earlier this year. Somewhere in it's last year, the blades started coming in with "Made in China". Alledgedly, these Chinese blades were the same specifications, but the missing "Freud" legendary blade certainly caused some disappointment with new owners.

              IMHO, Home Depot has certainly earned a reputation for "cheapening-down" many products in order to increase it's profit margin and create a competitive lead. While Home Depot has it's exclusive product lines like Ryobi, Ridgid, and Husky, the buyer has to really do their homework to ensure they are getting a competitive product. Like with Walmart, the manufacturer may have to cut corners here and there in order to meet the giant retailer's demands. (All too often, you'll find great Walmart items are really older models.)

              Merry Christmas,

              CWS

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              • #8
                CWS, yep that was the TS I had read so much good stuff about and was going to buy.
                Little River Bed and Breakfast, Peterborough NH

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                • #9
                  Another example of chain store devaluing is Hitachi Drill sold at Lowes.

                  Another example of chain store devaluing is Hitachi Drill sold at Lowes. Lowes sells it for $20 cheaper than other places...but substitutes 2 Amp Hr batteries for the 3 Amp Hr batteries it comes with, everywhere else. If you didn't read the specs you'd miss it.

                  At Lowes:

                  http://www.lowes.com/lowes/lkn?actio...DMR&lpage=none

                  At Toolbarn:

                  http://www.toolbarn.com/product/hitachi/DS18DMR/

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                  • #10
                    Disaster, I was just checking out ToolBarn which you cite in your post. DeWalt makes a cordless caulking gun (I have thought one of those would be nice). $250 - $290 for a caulking gun? That's freaking insane...what is DeWalt thinking? http://www.toolbarn.com/category/dewalt/cordcaulking/

                    One more question...what's the heck's a pencil vibrator (and no wise guy answers)? http://www.toolbarn.com/category/dew...lessspecialty/
                    Last edited by Doggy; 12-23-2006, 03:30 PM.
                    Little River Bed and Breakfast, Peterborough NH

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                    • #11
                      Check the exact model numbers on the tool and everything that comes with it. Also, be sure to check the SKU (bar code) numbers on the box. Big Box stores have special versions made just for them and this is not just power tools. Some time ago I found that Maytag clothes washers at Best Buy, Lowes and Sears had minor differences. After really checking the model numbers with care, I found a tiny difference. When I asked a smaller dealer that also does service he said that the models they sell cost more but are NOT the same machines inside. Checking parts lists proved this. What may seem the same, can be quite different when you really do your checking.

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                      • #12
                        Another reason why every store has differant model numbers for similar items is for the price matching game. Compare stuff in a ad sometime and I bet you will find minor differances in products that apear the same. The only diff may be an "A" at the end of a model number but that makes it ineligble for a price match.
                        Colorado Deck and Framing - When perfection is demanded

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                        • #13
                          Doggy.. A pencil vibrator is used in pouring footings and foundations. It is inserted into wet concrete and vibrates to settle the pour and remove air pockets.
                          there's a solution to every problem.....you just have to be willing to find it.

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                          • #14
                            Got it, thanks Finer998, my contractor used one of these earlier this year when pouring the footing for our stair addition!
                            Little River Bed and Breakfast, Peterborough NH

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                            • #15
                              cordless Caulking gun

                              When you're in business doing building or remodeling, a cordless caulking gun makes sense. You might be putting up 4x8 sheets of insulation onto basement walls before you put up the firring strips and the cordless caulk gun saves your hand a whole lot of agony doing this repetitive task. When you're framing up a house, the same thing applies as you're putting down the flooring sheets and even the roof sheathing. That cordless (some guys use the big air powered caulking guns for this) sure makes a difference in your productivity. Same if you're painting exteriors of homes and doing a lot of caulking as you go. For the homeowner, a cordless caulk gun tends to be overkill unless you're really into caulking and don't mind the price point. For the contractor or pro doing this work a lot, the cordless is a time and money saver that can't be beat. It also speeds up productivity like crazy and especially helpful when the homeowner happens to be on the job site watching you do some of the work. For the average guy, go to a Home Depot or other big box and buy one of the newer and more expensive (about $17 bucks or so) of the hand operated caulking guns. They work great, have a longer life span than the cheap $1 and $2 models and will do just fine for the little jobs most people find around their house.
                              If I'm not mistaken, that pencil vibrator is used to vibrate wet concrete down between the walls when you're doing a pour for a foundation or even building with ICFs. I haven't seen the one you're referring to, but most are shaped a bit like a pistol-grip drill with a long, flexible drive shaft hanging off the front end. That piece is dropped down into the concrete slurry, turned on and vibrate the concrete into place around anchors or other obstacles. You just don't want it on too long or the vibrator will bring all the water from the slurry to the top. Hope this helps answer some of your questions.
                              Jim Don

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