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What to look for in an angle grinder?

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  • #16
    Re: What to look for in an angle grinder?

    If you can find one and it should be on sale as RIDGID changed models some time ago their older RS1000 was a good one. The newer RS1001, I really can't say much about. You might find a deal on a factory reconditioned one, but do watch the prices.

    Having variable speed and a powerful motor is nice (Not a Ridgid as they don't have such yet). It does add to the cost, but then you'll most likely have this for many years so you may as well do yourself a favor and get a good (maybe not the best) one. I would argue about the size. Here in the USA there are far more choices in wheels and angle grinders in the 4-1/2" - 115mm size than the slightly larger 5" - 125mm models. Just please do NOT get a 4 inch model and do make sure whatever you buy that it has a 5/8-11 spindle. Other size spindles are nothing buy a major PITA to deal with. Try picking up and holding several. It needs to feel good in your hands. A spindle lock is nice too. I would pass over the "Quick Change" models in your case.

    I need to add that most 5 inch angle grinders will work well with 4-1/2 inch wheels. It's the shield over that's a bit larger. There are loads of brands and models to check out. Makita has some nice ones for the money. What you end up with really needs to be based on what works for you and how it feels in your hands.
    Last edited by Woussko; 03-17-2007, 11:08 AM.

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    • #17
      Re: What to look for in an angle grinder?

      My old 4 1/2" Black and Decker commercial literal burnt up a few weeks ago,
      and I bought a Dewalt 6" grinder, to replace it, and have been extremely happy with it,

      the size of it is about the same as the 4 1/2" but a tad bit longer,

      It seem to have more power, It is not a 9" Wildcat grinder, but it has the power to do general grinding and yet small and light and handy enough to do ever thing the 4 1/2" grinder does,

      One other thing I really like it for is the cut off wheels, the wheels are 6" and larger and last a lot longer, it is great for cutting welds, and other small cutting,

      the switch is the only thing I think it gets a bit to get use to, but in one way it is really nice, as you slide it on, and it says on, until you touch the back of the switch, (rock it) and it goes off.

      http://www.toolking.com/productinfo....roductid=21317
      http://www.toolup.com/productInfo.asp?pid={AB365F6A-C0AC-4C68-BEFD-1B1F8984E7D9}

      My son had a Dewalt 4 1/2" he had had in the welding shop, and had a bad switch in it, so the 4 1/2" is now part gray and part yellow, LOL.
      Dewalt was the main stay in most of the welding shops my son worked in, one shop used Milwaukee.

      I bought the reconditioned one form Tool king,

      I am not sure how one gets one but Ridgid has the R1000 discontinued, may be able to get one discounted,

      Click on products at the top and look under the left menu
      Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
      "The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good."
      attributed to Samuel Johnson
      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
      PUBLIC NOTICE: Due to recent budget cuts, the rising cost of electricity, gas, and oil...plus the current state of the economy............the light at the end of the tunnel, has been turned off.

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      • #18
        Re: What to look for in an angle grinder?

        First thing to look for is price!!! An angle grinder could very well be one of the most useful power tools you will ever buy. If you are a serious craftsman (as I am) a $30 POS is not going to cut it. A descent 4.5" grinder will cost about $70 - $100, money very well spent. I hardly ever do a job, wood or steel where I do not use an angle grinder, 4.5" or 9" for something.
        Personally I prefer a paddle switch and at least three positions for the handle.
        If you do go cheep on this tool do not buy cheep blades for safetys sake.

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        • #19
          Re: What to look for in an angle grinder?

          Originally posted by Woussko View Post
          ...Just please do NOT get a 4 inch model and do make sure whatever you buy that it has a 5/8-11 spindle. Other size spindles are nothing buy a major PITA to deal with. Try picking up and holding several. It needs to feel good in your hands. A spindle lock is nice too. I would pass over the "Quick Change" models in your case.
          Based in part on the advice on getting a grinder with a 5/8-11 arbor, I went ahead and bought a RS1001. Now that I am trying to get an assortment of discs for it, I have noticed that there actually are a lot more choices out on the Internet for 4 1/2 inch 7/8 arbor discs than 5/8 discs.

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          • #20
            Re: What to look for in an angle grinder?

            NavyBuck

            Yes, most discs have a 7/8 hole. Look at both flanges and you'll see why. There are discs made that screw directly on the spindle. Maybe that's what you're looking for, but you really should be fine with the regular ones that have the 7/8 center hole.
            Last edited by Woussko; 04-19-2007, 11:09 AM.

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            • #21
              Re: What to look for in an angle grinder?

              OK. Obviously I am a grinder noob. The RS1001 has a threaded spindle, but there is a flange to go on one side of the disc and a nut that goes on the other side. The disc is secured by tightening the nut. Do I understand correctly that a disc with a 7/8 hole will have no problem? Amazingly (at least to me), the instruction manual makes zero mention of which type of disc will work or is preferred.

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              • #22
                Re: What to look for in an angle grinder?

                One side of the nut should have a raised area that fits in the 7/8 hole and 5/8 disc are held by the spindle and you use the flat part of the nut. Hopefully that makes sense.

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                • #23
                  Re: What to look for in an angle grinder?

                  I know it seems crazy at first, but you'll get the idea over time. Look at the two flanges of which one is a sort of spindle adaptor and the other is the flange-nut. If you look at both carefully you'll see they are made to keep the 7/8" hole in a disc centered. Did your RS1001 come with any discs? If you don't like this arangement, you can buy discs with an attached nut that will thread directly on your spindle. Please see the links and pictures. I hope they help with this. You may have to look at both sides of the flanges as one or both may need to be flipped over.

                  Hint: Take a ruller and measure your spindle and nut flanges. You'll see both are made for use with a disc that has a 7/8" center hole. If not, then we need to get the right parts for your angle grinder so you can use them. They should be included with it. Also, just try such a disc and be sure it's centered. This is where I really wish I had some good pictures to show how it all fits together.
                  Attached Files
                  Last edited by Woussko; 04-19-2007, 05:37 PM.

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                  • #24
                    Re: What to look for in an angle grinder?

                    I will take a closer look this weekend based on your info. I really appreciate the members of this forum having the patience and the willingness to help me and others out. Thanks to you all. Maybe some day I will be able to contribute information, not just receive it.

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                    • #25
                      Re: What to look for in an angle grinder?

                      Very, very important, if you mount a flat knotted wire brush on your angle grinder, exercise extreme caution approaching ends or protrusions. The wire can and will grab the edge and launch the tool out of your hands and out of control. I had one grab my T shirt and wind itself up, twisting the shirt before it spooled down. We used welders, torches, machine tools, and all maner of hand tools in my shop, I consider the angle grinder the most hazardous of all, and instructed newcommers thoroughly.

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                      • #26
                        Re: What to look for in an angle grinder?

                        Sweeney,

                        I couldn't agree more. I used to use them to cut backer board for tile. I still use them to cut tile and what not. I have had helpers that didn't make it past the second day b/c they almost cut themselves with the angle grinder. A friend of mine, that is also a tile guy, had the grinder come out of his hand cutting a concrete block and the tool went into his leg. They couldn't put stitches in b/c the cut is so wide from the diamond blade. They had to carterize his leg. Long story short they can be very dangerous. Grinders turn at almost twice the RPMs of a circular saw. When they bind they can come right out your hand and sometimes the jolt will turn them off but most of the time they won't. My friend now uses a grinder with a trigger so if he drops it the blade stops turning. If you are unsure of your ability I would consider one with a trigger or paddle switch. I am going to buy one for my helper to use.

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                        • #27
                          Re: What to look for in an angle grinder?

                          If there's one tool I truly despise using its definately the angle grinder. I'm always glad when I'm done with it. Never had an accident with one but have had a few scares with kick backs. I got rid of the toggle switch models and bough a Dewalt 28402 with the paddle switch. Want to make sure it the thing flies off my hands it turns off right away.

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                          • #28
                            Re: What to look for in an angle grinder?

                            I had a piece of junk sears 7" grinder for a number of years, underpowered.

                            any way one day I was grinding with a 7" disk on it and it graped the tail of my flannel shirt by the time it stopped it had riped my shirt off of me (or nearly) and as it knotted up my shirt it hit my belly, I had a bruise on my belly about 8 to 10" across, I was sore for days, (no cuts or scratches) but one hurting belly.

                            I you ever got caught by a good Dewalt/Black and Decker wild cat grinder it would nearly ruin you,

                            many of the GOOD small 4 1/2" grinders have nearly as much power as the junk sears 7" unit had, and the 6" grinder Dewalt grinder has more power than the sears unit had,

                            the first black and Decker 4 1/2" (nearly the same tool as the Dewalt), I had it for 15 years, and used it for welding and commercial work, and it was a good unit I just wore it out, (i have had very good luck with my Dewalts),
                            a 41/2" a 6" and a 9", all commercial duty.

                            the 5/8x11 spindle is the normal commercial spindle and the 7/8 disks will work with the washer and the nut that comes with them,

                            What is nice is if you have a 9" or 7" grinder once the diskes wear down on them you can finish them out on the 4 1/2" grinder.
                            Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
                            ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
                            "The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good."
                            attributed to Samuel Johnson
                            ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
                            PUBLIC NOTICE: Due to recent budget cuts, the rising cost of electricity, gas, and oil...plus the current state of the economy............the light at the end of the tunnel, has been turned off.

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Re: What to look for in an angle grinder?

                              Well, I officially claim the dunce cap! I checked my RS1001 and it came with a disc with a 7/8" arbor, so that answers that. From looking at it, I don't think the flange is reversible, though. It has a square depression on one side that locks it on the spindle.

                              FYI, The RS1001 comes with a long switch (I would call it a "paddle", but others may not) that must be constantly depressed to operate the grinder. There is a way of locking it on, presumably for situations where the grinder is firmly secured to a bench, etc. Thanks for all the words of caution and sea stories. I will be VERY careful with this tool.

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