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  • Just a thought

    What do you think would be the actual cost for making an average corded drill, and what do you think would be the actual cost to make a battery drill. Now the battery drill would have to be lets say 18 volts to be in a comparison with a corded drill, power wise, torch, so forth. Even though the corded drill will still be stronger and runs a lot longer. What I'm getting at is the battery drills are still very expensive compared to the corded, and I guess they will stay that way as long as everybody keeps paying top dollars for them. I must be one of the few that will still buy and use a corded drill, I do have battery drills, but my choice is the cord, dependable, never quits on me, don't have to wait on a charge. Ya I know I'll probably catch hell for saying these things, but oh well. Back to the cost of making, I'm guessing they are $20.00-$30.00 dollars in difference, maybe even less, since they are producing more cordless tools then corded tools, which should bring down in cost because of larger orders, more demand. Don't rag on me too bad guys and gals, but lets hear what you have too say about this.
    Last edited by garager; 03-29-2007, 09:23 PM.
    Great Link for a Construction Owner/Tradesmen, and just say Garager sent you....

    http://www.contractorspub.com

    A good climbing rope will last you 3 to 5 years, a bad climbing rope will last you a life time !!!

  • #2
    Re: Just a thought

    Take a good long look at the Milwaukee web site. They have loads of corded tools. I really doubt they plan to cut them out for a long time. They (corded) do sell and especially where the customer needs to really work them long and hard everyday. Then you get into the larger tools where as of now we would have to use several batteries that would weight far too much. I'm sure over time that cordless tools of all manor will either drop in price or there will be new models that will make today's seem almost like toys.
    Last edited by Woussko; 03-30-2007, 12:44 PM. Reason: Wording was a mess

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    • #3
      Re: Just a thought

      Garager......There are many factors involved in the pricing of products. Lets consider a few of them in response to your corded vs battery question.
      1)Development cost-I am assuming that the development investment of the corded drill was essentially complete years ago. With the exception of minor advancements such as the variable speed control and keyless chuck all the development costs for a 1/2" professional grade Makita, Dewalt, Porter Cable, et.all were complete and have now been ammortised over millions of drills.

      Compare this to the significant ongoing development costs that have been ceaseless in the evolution of the professional grade cordless drill. This is a very heated and rapidly evolving competitive market. In just a few years we have moved from the 9.6V thru the 12V, 14.4, 18, 24, 28 and now 36 volt power units. We are currently in a rapid transition from Ni-cad batteries to Lithion Ion. All of this huge R&D cost, factory tooling cost and inventory much be averaged over a much smaller production base than your nice stable corded drill.
      2)Product introduction costs-At each stage of the evolution of the cordless drill there are huge costs involved with getting the product to market. Sales people to promote and support the product to all the channels of distribution including Home Depot, Lowes, all the distributors and independents. There's the cost of advertising in trade magazine's, tool shows and internet sites. Promotional campaigns offering deep discounts. Cost of training people for these products at every level in the distribution chain. Costs of training and supporting and supplying spare parts and manuals for repair of products. Costs of replacing and scrapping problem products which is inevitable in a rapidly evolving product life cycle.
      There are many other costs related to supporting products in a rapidly evolving highly competitive market vs the mature market of the corded drill. All of these costs have to be taken against comparatively short product life cycles. For the professional user the market is just transitioning from the 12 and 14 volt stage to the 18 and 24 volt stage. The 9.6 is a distant memory. When was it the standard? Ten short years ago. During that same period of time the costs for supporting the corded drill have remained the same and manufacturers have probably sold more of them than each of the individual cordless power ranges.
      Hope this has been helpful.
      Last edited by roadrashray; 03-29-2007, 10:08 PM. Reason: correction

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      • #4
        Re: Just a thought

        Pricing is actually not that different between the two when you really think about it. The major cost on a corded drill is typically the pair of batteries and charger. Manufacturing batteries is expensive, much more so with new lithium ion cells. A top of the line cordless drill with no battery runs are about the same cost as a high end corded drill. Also consider cordless tend to have a lot more features packed in. Almost all come with two and three speed gearboxes ranging from extreme high torque to high speed, they have hammer drill function as well as adjustable clutches. With a corded drill you at most get dual speed/torque and even then not on many. Cordless drills are far more versatile. Powerwise I think the era of the corded drill outpowering the cordless variety are long gone. The average high end 18v drill offers the same power or more as mid range corded drills and 36v units are already matching and even outclassing the most powerfull corded drills. The only advantage left to corded is run time and weight. Even when it comes to weight I find the T handle and balance of cordless to make them a lot easier to use and handle than a lighter pistol grip corded drill. Run time on cordless drills has also keeps getting longer and batteries are charging faster. At least to me my corded hammerdrill has been relegated to a backup tool that gets taken out of the tool box maybe once a year.
        As mentioned above though, corded drills are in no risk of dissapearing any time soon. Look at the pages for any manufacturer and you will find dozens of corded models of every kind.

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        • #5
          Re: Just a thought

          I didn't say that the corded tools will be taken out or that they will just dissapear, I'm sure they will be around forever, because they are dependable. What I'm getting at is when you enter a job site everybody darn near has a cordless something in their hands, "sometime" you'll see someone w/a corded tool. I am not against that, shoot I own 6 cordless drills plus many other items. The point is "the cost of making "VS" the cost of selling", too me it looks like the profits are very heavy in the cordless tool dept. because people are willing to pay no matter what the cost. Velosapien said, "Pricing is actually not that different between the two when you really think about it", and to me I believe this statement, I really don't think its that big of a difference in the cost of making. "Manufacturing batteries is expensive", yes that is true, but as we move much more into this tech. those prices are dropping for cost of manufacturing. This is about higher profits, not about corded tools disappearing from the market.
          Great Link for a Construction Owner/Tradesmen, and just say Garager sent you....

          http://www.contractorspub.com

          A good climbing rope will last you 3 to 5 years, a bad climbing rope will last you a life time !!!

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Just a thought

            I agree that the expense is in the battery and charger which, likely cost as much or more than the tool. That is why Ryobi's OnePlus system is so nice. MaxSelect likewise...but when you realize the amount they are saving by not packaging the batteries and charger you realize they are overpriced. Still it is nice to have the option of picking up an individual tool, when you need it, rather than having to spend several hundred dollars for a set.

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            • #7
              Re: Just a thought

              One thing here to mention on manufacturing. Keep in mind that Lithium is a very dangerous substance. Manufacturing in a large quantity production environment involving lithium is going to cost more due to the stringent safety precautions a factory will have to take.
              I put it all back together better than before. There\'s lots of leftover parts.

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              • #8
                New Buyer Question...

                Hello all,

                I'm having trouble finding anything more than d'spected saws from major tool stores & shops. I'm looking to find a durable circular saw for my new deck project on my home.

                I want the "origional" manufaturer's model, but running into the same problem (as stated above).

                Any ideas/places I should look other than Home Depot or Lowe's?

                Thanks all,

                Bob

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                • #9
                  Re: Just a thought

                  Not sure what you're asking. You want a bare tool cordless circular saw that is not from a broken up kit such as many on ebay? With full manufacturer warranty and all?

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                  • #10
                    Re: New Buyer Question...

                    [QUOTE=bobj1444;73361]Hello all,

                    I'm having trouble finding anything more than d'spected saws from major tool stores & shops. I'm looking to find a durable circular saw for my new deck project on my home.

                    I want the "origional" manufaturer's model, but running into the same problem (as stated above).

                    I don't know what "d'spected" or "original manufaturer's model" mean. I don't know how complex this deck job is(pretty much straight cut or lots of angles) however I have found a compound miter saw to be the most useful when building decks. That and a good screw gun of course.
                    Last edited by roadrashray; 03-31-2007, 10:45 AM. Reason: correction

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                    • #11
                      Re: Just a thought

                      A point re, cordless/battery is, that some of us work in other materials. I work (only) in stainless steel, and even most corded is inadequate! so battery that might be handy for a few light jobs, isn't really worth getting, as very few power tools, inexpensive cord, or battery, can work heavy and slow for extended periods, as I need.
                      I will mention that I love my Ridgid PB28. It makes immaculate bends, in 25mm stainless pipe, for boat railings, & fittings, and it does it all day-no problem.

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