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  • Dewalt 36v

    Has anybody used the Dewalt 36v drill?
    I just used mine for the first time.
    I drilled some holes with it,and it seems to have about the power of a strong 18v. (I expected more). Despite what Dewalt claims about UWO'S, from what I have done so far,a strong corded like a holeshooter would blow this thing away.
    I will let the batteries get broken in,and try it with a decent size holesaw.
    It seems like Dewalt has improved the 3 speed shifter,it seems smoother.

  • #2
    Re: Dewalt 36v

    I have the Milwaukee V28 set and the first time I used them I felt the same thing you describe. After using them on the job next to other guys using NiCad tools, I can see mine are a little better. But when I look at what I paid, I wonder if the additional money was well spent. Overall I'm happy with the set because I like having the latest and the greatest. But for a person on a budget, I wouldn't recommend them.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Dewalt 36v

      Keep in mind the power it takes to perform a certain task is what matters. If a lower power drill can provide sufficient power at the same rpm there will effectively be no performance difference. For the sake of argument lets say it takes 150 in-lbs of torque at 1400rpm to drill a 1 inch hole in a certain kind of wood. An 18v drill can easily provide double that so at the same rpm a 36v drill will not perform any faster at all even if it can peak at higher power output. Having more power makes no difference because it only takes 150 in-lbs to accomplish the task.

      Try the 36v to hammerdrill poured concrete or drive some huge holesaws and it will blow an 18v drill away. For most of my work I actually use a Makita 18v compact drill with a fair bit less power than the bigger 18v drills but as long as the work being performed is within its maximum power output it performs just as well.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Dewalt 36v

        FUR

        Try this and then please post the results.

        Run your new drill under light load or no load until it starts to slow down and then please stop. Give the battery a few minutes rest and then put it in the charger and leave it until the charger says it's fully charged. Then try the drill again and give it some pretty heavy duty drilling work. If it still seems under powered next to a similar size and type of corded drill, I would either exchange it for another of the same and try that, or if necessary (if dealer gets too tuff) take it or send it to a DeWalt service center along with a copy of your receipt. You might give DeWalt a call at 1-800-433-9258 and ask them about it. By the way which model do you have and what speed setting(s) did you try using? You might try shifting gears and try drilling the same size holes again.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Dewalt 36v

          That's exactly it. Don't use the 36V to drive deck screws, for instance, and expect it to perform such a small task "faster" than an 18V drill. Like Velosapien suggests, try something big and you should start to see the difference.

          Moving to the high speed range - on mine I can shred into wood much more aggressively than an 18V drill. The motor grunt and slowing is much less on the 36 in such a situation. The power difference is pretty noticeable.

          What kind of bits are you using? can you specify what size?

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          • #6
            Re: Dewalt 36v

            I just drilled some 3 inch holes with a holesaw,(thru 2 by) in low (400 rpm)-4 holes,some 1-1/2 spade holes in high (1600 rpm),and some 1 in auger holes.
            The battery still has plenty of juice,but I am running out of scrapwood.
            Actually after using this drill for nearly a week,this drill definitly has some power,first gear is mighty strong.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Dewalt 36v

              I think anyone that has bought into this has been fooled once again by Dewalt. My buddy is a Dewalt rep in Pittsburgh and I asked him about the 36 volt. He told me it only has about 300 in/lbs of torque and that is why they came up with the new UWO rating. He also told me that they have been having a lot of problems with the self tightening chuck and the circ saw. I am waiting to see what Ridgid does with their 18 volt Lithium before I decide who's combo kit to buy. From what I have seen so far, I just don't think the higher voltages give you to much. The only application I can see them making a great deal of difference is maybe on the rotary hammers. Other than that the weight does not seem worth it. I don't care for the Milwalkee V18, so I hope that Ridgid does something better than that. Otherwise I think I will end up with the Makita.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Dewalt 36v

                I would suggest trying the tools yourself before making any judgements based on what "so and so said"

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Dewalt 36v

                  Originally posted by ToolHead View Post
                  I think anyone that has bought into this has been fooled once again by Dewalt. My buddy is a Dewalt rep in Pittsburgh and I asked him about the 36 volt. He told me it only has about 300 in/lbs of torque and that is why they came up with the new UWO rating. He also told me that they have been having a lot of problems with the self tightening chuck and the circ saw. I am waiting to see what Ridgid does with their 18 volt Lithium before I decide who's combo kit to buy. From what I have seen so far, I just don't think the higher voltages give you to much. The only application I can see them making a great deal of difference is maybe on the rotary hammers. Other than that the weight does not seem worth it. I don't care for the Milwalkee V18, so I hope that Ridgid does something better than that. Otherwise I think I will end up with the Makita.
                  The UWO rating was not invented by dewalt. This has been the way tools are rated pretty much all over the world by most brands. Dewalt was just the first to push it in the US and its about time. Their tools were rated in watts in their european sites for a long time. Torque ratings are meaningless and obsolete because they only tell you the max torque burst for a fraction of a second just before the motor stalls in the lowest gear. As far as artificial figures go maximum torque is way up there. Power drills have effectively close to topped out to the maximum amount of manegable torque in the lowest gear without resorting to a spade handle drill. The speed ranges used most commonly on drills in the 1000+ rpm range are easily well under 300 in/lbs. The only problem with the 36v series is if you don't need the extra power you are wasting your money. If you want cordless power and you are overheating your 18v tools, the 36v is clearly the better choice. For one they have the only power source capable of adequately moving a full size 7 1/4 circular saw. As mentioned, if you want a woodworking drill of to drive deck screws, the 36v drill is going to be a heavy dissapointment.

                  I don't know about any problems with the self tightening chuck but its now standard on all their cordless hammer drills. I've been using it on my DC925 for months and its in a class by itslelf. It just needs to click into place and the bit doesn't slip. No grip of death required and easily blows away the standard Jacobs 5000/7000 series found in almost every cordless drills. Its flat out the best keyless hammerdrill chuck there is IMO.

                  For what its worth I moved from Dewalt 18v XRP to Makita LXT's and it was a pretty bad decision. Most of the LXT stuff is clearly designed around light weight and small package but clearly suffers in performance. Battery life ranges from phenomenal to below average depending on the tool. The hammerdrill is pretty badly underpowered and the gearing is all wrong. The highest torque gear is too slow to be of any use at 300rpm. The middle speed of 600 rpm is a little to fast to offer enough torque and a little too slow to be of much use for much else. The hammerdrill mode is also highly innefective. The DC925 blows it out of the water in such a way its almost pathetic.
                  The reciprocating saw is a rather cruel joke. It is quite terribly underpowered. It bogs down pretty easily even on something as simple as PT 2X4. My DC385 saw powered through clearly with a lot more grunt that if I wasn't careful the tool would slip off my hands if the blade binds. The Makita just stalls. To make things worse the battery life with the reciprocating saw is actually really bad. Its hardly any better than my old NiCD saw, and I'm pretty sure it is actually WORSE. The circular saw is very nice. Super well balanced and small. Pretty close to my old DC390, maybe a little bit better. Gets awesome runtime and comes with easily the best 6 1/2" 24t blades I've tried. Cuts very fast with no bogging down and leaves remarkably clean cuts.
                  The impact driver is the real jewl. It doesn't particularly perform better the my old Dewalt 18v but its size weight and balance is just close to perfection. All in all if I had to do it again I would have kept all my 18v Dewalt tools and just bought the Makita LXT impact driver.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Dewalt 36v

                    Originally posted by Velosapien View Post
                    For what its worth I moved from Dewalt 18v XRP to Makita LXT's and it was a pretty bad decision. Most of the LXT stuff is clearly designed around light weight and small package but clearly suffers in performance. Battery life ranges from phenomenal to below average depending on the tool. The hammerdrill is pretty badly underpowered and the gearing is all wrong. The highest torque gear is too slow to be of any use at 300rpm. The middle speed of 600 rpm is a little to fast to offer enough torque and a little too slow to be of much use for much else. The hammerdrill mode is also highly innefective. The DC925 blows it out of the water in such a way its almost pathetic.
                    The reciprocating saw is a rather cruel joke. It is quite terribly underpowered. It bogs down pretty easily even on something as simple as PT 2X4. My DC385 saw powered through clearly with a lot more grunt that if I wasn't careful the tool would slip off my hands if the blade binds. The Makita just stalls. To make things worse the battery life with the reciprocating saw is actually really bad. Its hardly any better than my old NiCD saw, and I'm pretty sure it is actually WORSE. The circular saw is very nice. Super well balanced and small. Pretty close to my old DC390, maybe a little bit better. Gets awesome runtime and comes with easily the best 6 1/2" 24t blades I've tried. Cuts very fast with no bogging down and leaves remarkably clean cuts.
                    The impact driver is the real jewl. It doesn't particularly perform better the my old Dewalt 18v but its size weight and balance is just close to perfection. All in all if I had to do it again I would have kept all my 18v Dewalt tools and just bought the Makita LXT impact driver.
                    Great info. Yours is the kind of review it would be nice to see more of, comparing one tool to another.

                    Looking forward to the day DeWalt comes out with 18 volt lithium batteries for their XRP line. The DC925 would be even better with a 3 amp hour lithium (would probably even weigh a bit less than the current NiMh.)

                    I gave the 24 volt Ridgid lithium reciprocating saw a workout last week. A neighbors Willow tree split in half and fell into my evergreens and his Crabapple. Did a heck of a lot of damage...and had three trees leaning way over from the weight of the huge limb (two feet in diameter at base.) Thought about using the chainsaw, but I was heading out later and didn't want to get all two-stroke smelly.

                    Started at the top where it was maybe 6-8 inches around and wacked off chunks of limb with the saw and a Skil Ugly blade. It made short work of the tree. I cut all the way back to where the limb was twice as thick as the length of the blade...working from both sides. The saw ripped right through it. I went through one 18 volt battery and one 24 volt. Could definitely notice the extra power of the 24 volt...especially compared to how the 18 volt tailed off as it got used up. The 24 volt lithium felt the same from beginning to end.

                    The saw has good weight and balance, and relatively low vibration...with it's rubberized grip it was very comfortable to work with. I didn't get fatigued at all in the 20 minutes I used it. The blade went in easy and stayed in. The power was great...at a couple points I cut too far from underneath and the limb started jamming the blade. The saw kept powering....bouncing me back and forth....till I was able to free it.

                    One of my issues with Ridgid 24 volt line is the weight...especially of the drill which goes about 7 and 1/2 pounds. However, with the reciprocating saw, the weight is a plus. It helps balance it and reduce the vibration. IMO, at an ounce over 9 pounds, the weight is perfect.

                    The only issue I had was the lithium batteries were stone dead when I grabbed them from storage. I'm pretty sure I charged them...or at least one of them, 3 months ago. I expected them to be 90-95% full.
                    Last edited by Disaster; 04-15-2007, 10:41 AM.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Dewalt 36v

                      I forgot to also mention the LXT recipro saw is also substantially larger AND heavier. Go figure.

                      I had a somewhat similar experience recently helping a friend remove a dead tree. The trunk was about 18 inches wide. I used a Skil Ugly pruning blade which is about 9 inches long. Worked my way around the trunk. Used the Dewalt DC385 and the darn thing never stalled even with the blade fully plunged in the tree. Took a full three batteries but it got the job done. A couple of weeks later when I got the Makita saw I went to tear down a temporary wall division of assorted PT and non PT 2X4's with the Makita. I was rather puzzled when it cut through pretty slowly through them and almost stalled and pinched easily on the PT ones. The Dewalt would not even break a sweat doing that. I figured the batteries were maybe not fully broken in but many months later of regular use and the saw is still a dissapointment.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Dewalt 36v

                        The self tightening chuck is awesome. I have not had one single instance where that thing has given up and let go. At first it feels strange because, like you say, you simply turn and click it in place on the bit shank. But it never lets go. Period.

                        Even Milwaukee's Lok Tor chuck, which is one of the good ones, has loosened on me on a couple of occasions.

                        That lithium review article that I posted a while ago, those guys were complaining that the chuck actually overtightens and sticks to the bit. That I have never had happen. I've had the chuck leave marks on some bits (large ones), but that's no big deal at all. In fact even other chucks have done that. It would be nice to know exactly what they were doing when they had that occur. That's what I thought was pretty cheap about that review is that they gave no details about anything they did.

                        Originally posted by Velosapien View Post
                        I don't know about any problems with the self tightening chuck but its now standard on all their cordless hammer drills. I've been using it on my DC925 for months and its in a class by itslelf. It just needs to click into place and the bit doesn't slip. No grip of death required and easily blows away the standard Jacobs 5000/7000 series found in almost every cordless drills. Its flat out the best keyless hammerdrill chuck there is IMO.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Dewalt 36v

                          I thought I'd post this. Just picked up the 36v drill/sawzall combo which dropped in price at HD. Well when I finally put the Makita reciprocating saw side by side with the Dewalt 36v I was surprised to say the least. The Makita saw is a fair bit longer and taller than the 36v saw. It also weighs exactly the same with the batteries installed. Both just under 9 pounds. Without the batteries the 36v tool is a full pound lighter. So much for 18v compactness. The only extra space taken up by the 36v saw was the battery just in front of the grip. The 18v DC385k(type 2) is actually identical in shape and size except for the battery. Now I'm convinced the LXT sawzall has no redeeming quality. The 36v saw cuts like it has 4 or 5 times the power of the LXT.
                          Attached Files

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                          • #14
                            Re: Dewalt 36v

                            Cool! You decided to take the plunge.

                            Once you get used to the 36V tools you won't go back. The recip saw is a super fast cutter and very aggressive - I've compared it to a corded Milwaukee super sawzall, and the performance seemed to be very similar in cut speed.

                            The drill's power is outstanding as well - it's handled everything I've thrown at it so far without the slightest complaint. Amazing tools..

                            Enjoy!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: Dewalt 36v

                              They dropped to $479 at HD so I decided it was a good time to pick them up. They are still about $599 + shipping just about anywhere online and $799 for the 4 piece kit. I'm just going to pick up the circular saw on ebay for like $120 and flashlight for $19 and I'll still come out well under the retail price of the 4 piece kit.

                              I gave them their first test run replacing some windows in my apartment and am very pleased. I just plunged the saw to cut between the concrete frame and old window, slicing down all around the window cutting through the aluminum frame, tapcons holding it up and a bunch of old silicone. I had tried that with the makita and it would barely make it a couple of inches before binding and draining the batteries. This thing pulled it off without a breaking a sweat. I was more concerened about it busting the blade than binding.
                              Then drillied about 25 holes into reinforced concrete columns and beams to get a wood frame and some 2X4's attached to the opening (5th floor) with tapcons so I wouldn't fall out installing the new windows and keep concrete debris from falling down. It drilled quite effortlessly with one hand at awkward angles which are usually very difficult with hammer drills if you can't get behind the drill and put some weight down on it. The only thing I missed was a high rpm. They slowed the top speed down to 1600rpm from 2000rpm in the 18v models. It can clearly hammerdrill even faster if they increased the speed to incease the bumps per minute rate.
                              I'm definately looking forward to getting the circular saw.
                              Last edited by Velosapien; 06-20-2007, 01:00 PM.

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