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  • #16
    Re: Cordless Vs. Corded

    I would never buy power tools from HF, but I would miss a few of their bargains. I got some magnetic trays, two belt cleaning sticks, a plastic screw organizer (with far better latches than the equivalent at HD and OSH) for under $20! So at least you can store all the parts of your blown-up tools for cheap...
    A good carpenter makes few mistakes, a great carpenter can fix his own.

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    • #17
      Re: Cordless Vs. Corded

      Okay, Woussko, I tried your test the other day on a nice 'n wet PT 4x4. Exact same size auger bit as yours, 1 1/4", self-feeding, standard sort of thing.

      The 36V handles it without even blinking. In 1st gear (400RPM) it's not fair to even call a challenge it handled it so easily. To up the ansey, I put it in 1200RPM mode (2nd gear) and it still blazed right through no problemo. No signs of straining.

      For the sake of comparison, let's take a 7AMP corded Milwaukee drill like the 0202-20 model. It's 7AMP, 1200RPM, and it's rated up to a 1" auger bit.

      Originally posted by Woussko View Post
      For what this is worth, I tried this and it went along with no problems. Tool: Milwaukee 1660 1/2" spade handle drill and this is an old one.

      Drill bits: Several different new condition 1-1/4" auger bits which were switched after drilling 12 or 13 holes.

      Wood: Scraps of PT 4 x 4s from lumber yards and a contractor working in the area.

      Also: A good heavy machinist bench vise to hold the wood. It's really fastened to my main bench.

      Job: Drill 25 holes through the 4 x 4s and really work that old drill.

      Result: Milwaukee 1660 drill is still laughing at me and telling me to really work it hard next test time. I got the workout. LOL
      -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

      Part 2: Same as above only this time I used this ElCheepo 1/2" drill.
      http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/cta...emnumber=47991

      Result: This one was brand new and never finished. After 5-1/2 holes and without really being pushed, it blew up. The motor went up in smoke. It really did and I was happy to take it outside and put it in the trash. By the way it was a gift from someone and was sort of a joke. He knew I like to destroy junker tools for fun. I heard he got it on special as a display model. It was missing the side handle and was pretty dusty, but that was easy to solve.

      Buy junk and get &&^%$ or buy quality and enjoy it for a long time. - me

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      • #18
        Re: Cordless Vs. Corded

        Skeeter

        That's great, but how about drilling 25 of that size hole one after the other? One thing I really wish tool companies would do is to publish the RPM under full rated load. The no load RPM ratings are almost useless. I think you would need to change the chuck on the 0202 but that's easy.

        Just for fun, I tried the 1-1/4" auger bit that I have in my old 2 speed Dewalt 14.4 Volt cordless drill and going through a 2 x 4 in low gear. It begged me to release the trigger and not work it so hard. There's a big difference in your 36 Volt "The Beast" and the older cordless tools. Please don't work it too hard. Save the real grunt jobs for a drill you don't like-love-need as much. I'm sure you will.

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        • #19
          Re: Cordless Vs. Corded

          Woussko, I did holes one right after another, without breaking in between. I stopped after 32 holes, I was drilling at a fairly low height and my arm was startin' to get tired. Maybe I need to go to the gym more often LOL

          But the drill was showing zero signs of weakening or slowing due and the battery wasn't fading whatsoever. The motor area was started to get a little warm. Not at all hot though.

          I agree, the compact series dewalt's like the 14.4's aren't super powerful. They're enough to get by for general purpose stuff, but the XRP's are probably a lot better for things like big auger bits. Probably 14.4V XRP can handle most auger bits in 1st gear.
          Last edited by Sceeter W Wheels; 04-15-2007, 08:24 PM.

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          • #20
            Re: Cordless Vs. Corded

            The compact dewalt drills are fine for light duty stuff but they are in no match for the heavier duty 3 speed XRP models. All XRP models share most of the same internals including the transmission regardless of being 12v-14v or 18v.

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            • #21
              Re: Cordless Vs. Corded

              The XRPs are very good drills overall. Admitedly there's a few annoying things though, such as the gear shift that seems to stick when shifting gears. Does Makita LXT do that too? And I don't think their clutch is all that consistent either. But all in all they're tough drills and are well powered for their size.

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              • #22
                Re: Cordless Vs. Corded

                Actually yes, the Makita LXT 3 speed drills suffer the same gear shifting jam. I don't think this is a Dewalt exclusive annoyance and has more to do with the nature of 3 speed gearboxes. Having more gears in there means its trickier for the teeth to fall into alignment when you shift. I've actually found the Dewalt clutch consistant at least in the drills I own. The issue is you need to select the proper gear which a lot of people won't bother to do. In the lowest gear even when set to the lowest torque setting its still has quite a lot of torque. In the highest gear you can almost stop it by lightly pinching it. The gear selection has a direct impact on the clutch settings.

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                • #23
                  Re: Cordless Vs. Corded

                  I noticed that too. From what I understand about the XRP/3-speed DeWalt drill is that the torque is clutched before the gearing, so depending on the speed selected it results in a different output torque limit depending on the gear, which is exactly as you describe.

                  What I was meaning is that I've tried different XRP drills I've noticed that torque setting #1 in gear #1 might be a little different from one drill to another. This could have been just a fluke of the drills I tried, though.

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                  • #24
                    Re: Cordless Vs. Corded

                    For what this may be worth, a good many drill-drivers have the clutch before the gearing. My almost antique 9.6 Volt Makita and my not quite so old 2 speed 14.4 Volt Dewalt are both that way.

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                    • #25
                      Re: Cordless Vs. Corded

                      My 18V XRP had the same issue with the sticking gear changes. That's one of the reasons I got rid of it. I don't think a I had issues with my Makita 18V, but I hated the fact that the Makita didn't have a locking spindle. I got a Bosch 18V Brute hammer/drill and couldn't be happier. It's not Li-Ion, but the Blue-core batteries are awesome. I use my Ridgid a lot too. Ever since I got an impact driver, I use it more than a drill, even for drilling.

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