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Cordless Vs. Corded

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  • Cordless Vs. Corded

    Does anyone know what volt cordless tool would compare to corded tools? I have many dewalt tools of various volts and just recently started to switch over to Ridgid. I have started with the 24 volt hammerdrill and 24 volt circular saw. I'm just curious if there has been any coparisons of different volt tools compared to corded tools, or what people think of these tools compared to corded.

  • #2
    Re: Cordless Vs. Corded

    The Milwaukee V28 tools have often been compared (in the Milwaukee ads of course) to having the power of a corded drill. I would guess that any of the good brands, Ridgid, Dewalt, Bosch, Milwaukee, in the 24-36 volt range would compare very favorably to the corded variety. My question to you is, what are you doing with your cordless. Homeowner? Major DIYer? Home Builder, Contractor. Your need for true cordless with corded power should be dictated by what you do. If you are on brand new jobsites where service hasn't been supplied yet. Go for the biggest, best cordless stuff you can afford. It's going to make the difference of night and day with your work. If you're a homeowner and you want to buy some cordless stuff, like a good cordless drill, buy yourself something with LION in the 18-volt range and call it good. Going big bucks on cordless if you're just fixing stuff around your house is not worth the money you're going to spend. I'd actually recommend buying a little better brand of corded tools at that point to fill the gap since you've got plenty of outlets in and outside of a home ,and in the garage. But again, it all depends on what you want to do and where you're going to do it. Just my 2 cents worth, for what ever it's worth.
    Jim Don

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    • #3
      Re: Cordless Vs. Corded

      I am a contractor and as I said, I have many Dewalts with varying voltages. I picked up a friends 18 volt Dewalt hammerdrill and thought to myself, I gotta have one of these. However, after trying it, I was not impressed at all. The hammering just felt like a vibration in the drill. After hearing about the Ridgid warranty and all the good things I'm reading about Ridgid tools on this forrum, I decided to start switching over to Ridgid. If the Ridgid tools hold there own, I will start to retire the Dewalt stuff as It dies instead of replacing it. Thank you for your reply and I appreciate any comments about this thread.

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      • #4
        Re: Cordless Vs. Corded

        Thats very diffucult to answer because there are many levels of power and performance when it comes to corded tools themselves. For example there are low and mid range corded drills that are easily beat by 18v corded models. For the most part high power cordless tools like Milwaukee V28 and Dewalt 36v are pretty close to high power corded models on some of the tools. Some of them still have a ways to go like the circular saws. If you're shopping for cordless tools I wouldn't base myself on that criteria though.

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        • #5
          Re: Cordless Vs. Corded

          Kelpike

          Whatever you do, please don't give up your corded tools just yet. Let's say that you need to make 200 cuts through 2 x 10s all in one day. No way are you doing that with even the most powerful of today's cordless circular saws unless you have loads of charged up batteries ready for work. On the other hand you may really like the lower weight of the newer Makita (and others) 18 Volt Li-Ion tools for drill-drivers and impact drivers where you don't need super power.

          Before you go and invest in any new cordless tools, be sure you can buy extra batteries and chargers locally or from a good online/mail order dealer that you know and trust. You may want to buy a few tools of whichever brand and model you like, take them to where several of you can hold them for some time and be sure they won't wear you down. Be sure you can return them in a few days (really depends on dealer) if they simply don't work out for your needs.

          Maybe this is more a "me" thing, but I really don't wish to carry a real heavy cordless tool up a ladder for extended use when I don't need it. Example: Drilling 1/8" holes in wood. A little light weight drill can more than handle that task. On the other hand when I need a powerhouse of a tool, I'll go for corded when I can. I really think in a few years we will be laughing at the cordless tools of today just like when I think back on my old SKIL 6.0 Volt 1/4" cordless drill that went into retirement a few years ago. It did the light duty work fine, but no way would it drill 1" holes in hardwood. It was very compact and light weight however.
          Last edited by Woussko; 04-08-2007, 11:54 PM.

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          • #6
            Re: Cordless Vs. Corded

            I don't think any comparison between power levels of corded and cordless is accurate at all. Granted a fully charged cordless tool might equal the power of a corded tool at one point but as the battery wears down it soon isn't equal any longer. Seeing as this is a make believe comparison with no criteria, I'd have to say that no cordless power tool is equal to it's equivalent corded brother when it comes to availability of power at any given moment.
            Teach your kids about taxes..........eat 30 percent of their ice cream.

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            • #7
              Re: Cordless Vs. Corded

              I would say they're pretty much there. but like Velosapien said earlier, it totally depends on what you're comparing to what.

              The 36V DeWalt circular saw is quite powerful. I don't know if it would do as good as a top of the line worm drive though, despite DeWalt's comparison to a Skil HD77, that may be stretching it a bit. That would be call for a side-by-side cutting test with the exact same blade. It's probably as good as a typical sidewinder or "hypoid" saw, as they say.

              I might also say that corded can maybe handle the very bogged-down situations a slightly better too. Like I said in an earlier thread, there seems to be an overload protection built into the DeWalt batteries (not sure if Milwaukee V28 has the same thing or not, but wouldn't surprise me if it does) that kicks in when the bogging down gets to a certain level. Once that happens, all bets are off. Very few corded tools have such an electric overload protection (although some actually do as well). They'll basically fight to the end. Then again, with a lower voltage, cordless has to deal with a very high amperage under stall conditions and this can easily burn out or destroy the motors and batteries. Quite quickly too. Corded can also burn out, but the chances are not as great, because they're typically only running within the 15A range.

              One thing I've found too is that the battery is not completely "fade free". There's a slight droop in speed as the battery goes down. However I will say that it doesn't seem anywhere near as prominent as with NiCad batteries and the power does stay quite constant.

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              • #8
                Re: Cordless Vs. Corded

                How about having some fun. Try using non PT 2 x 10s and make 50 cross cuts. Do this with the Dewalt 36 Volt using a good quality cross cut blade in it. See how many times you have to swap the battery to get the total job done. Do not force the saw. This is not a speed race, but rather a test to get some idea of battery capacity. We all know a good corded circular saw would be more than up to that job as long as it's not overloaded by a speed cutting foolish user.

                The next task is to try using a 1 inch auger bit and drill 100 holes through PT 4 x 4s. When it gets dull then change it for another of the same. Next we can try the same with a good 1/2" heavy duty corded drill of the same style. This is one case where I think Milwaukee V28 might win. They do have a 1/2" D handle drill and we can try that and a 1107 or 1007 corded as well.

                I want to see someone do up a 36 Volt version of a HoleHawg style RA drill soon. Even it it only gets a 5 minute per battery average run time, it would still be very handy.

                For what it's worth my corded tools are staying here. The cordless will be only for use where the cord is a problem. With any power tool an overload protector should be included but then it would make the tool cost a little bit more and customers would howl. Not me, but a good many would howl about it.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Cordless Vs. Corded

                  Originally posted by Woussko View Post
                  How about having some fun. Try using non PT 2 x 10s and make 50 cross cuts. Do this with the Dewalt 36 Volt using a good quality cross cut blade in it. See how many times you have to swap the battery to get the total job done. Do not force the saw. This is not a speed race, but rather a test to get some idea of battery capacity. We all know a good corded circular saw would be more than up to that job as long as it's not overloaded by a speed cutting foolish user.
                  I'd love to try that test unfortunately I don't have enough scrap material to waste trying it. However I wouldn't be surprised if the cordless tool can handle it with no more than one battery swap. I'd even dare say it might do it on one charge. I've made dozens of cuts on my Makita LXT circular saw through pressure treated 2X4 and 2X8 on a single charge and have not managed to drain the battery more than about 50%. The truth is the batteries actually charge faster than I can drain them with the new charger doing a full charge in 20 minutes. Runtimes on Lithium Ion are good enough that you'll probably have a charged battery by the time the one used is drained. Under hard continuos use you might need three and its unlikely you will ever find yourself powerless after that point unless you forget to pop them in the charger.

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                  • #10
                    Re: Cordless Vs. Corded

                    Here is my idea of a cordless drill I would like to try out sometime. I do not wish to buy it, but it would be nice to just give it a little test sometime.

                    http://www.stihlusa.com/augersdrills/BT45_drill.html - Landscapers love this for drilling landscape timbers and RR ties.

                    http://www.echo-usa.com/product.asp?...ry=ENGINEDRILL - Another one I would like to try sometime.
                    Last edited by Woussko; 04-13-2007, 07:00 PM.

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                    • #11
                      Re: Cordless Vs. Corded

                      I would like to setup a test like that sometime and post the results. I actually haven't had a chance to try that sort of repetitive test cutting out yet. Right off the batt, my gut instinct says no problem. 50 cross cuts, 2x10? We're talking near the end of the board where you would get minimal blade pinching? It's really when you bog down of a cordless that kills the battery. Usually when I'm using mine, I'm doing various cuts, so it's hard to get a gauge of exactly how many it will do of a certain type. But typically speaking it's getting at least (to be pessimistic) twice the runtime as an 18.

                      The drill will drive a 1" auger through most wood in 2nd gear (1200RPM). A 4x4 I would say no problem too, but trying to recall if I've done that one with a 1" bit - there's not much difference really. I've definitely put a 7/8" through multiple 2x4s in 2nd gear and it handles it. How many holes? again that would be another good thing to test out repetitively.

                      Another thing I've noticed on the drill is that not only is the power higher, but there's a lot more endurance. The motor tends not to tire out and heat up like an 18V. That's a major improvement by itself and makes it much more corded-like.

                      Originally posted by Woussko View Post
                      How about having some fun. Try using non PT 2 x 10s and make 50 cross cuts. Do this with the Dewalt 36 Volt using a good quality cross cut blade in it. See how many times you have to swap the battery to get the total job done. Do not force the saw. This is not a speed race, but rather a test to get some idea of battery capacity. We all know a good corded circular saw would be more than up to that job as long as it's not overloaded by a speed cutting foolish user.

                      The next task is to try using a 1 inch auger bit and drill 100 holes through PT 4 x 4s. When it gets dull then change it for another of the same. Next we can try the same with a good 1/2" heavy duty corded drill of the same style. This is one case where I think Milwaukee V28 might win. They do have a 1/2" D handle drill and we can try that and a 1107 or 1007 corded as well.

                      I want to see someone do up a 36 Volt version of a HoleHawg style RA drill soon. Even it it only gets a 5 minute per battery average run time, it would still be very handy.

                      For what it's worth my corded tools are staying here. The cordless will be only for use where the cord is a problem. With any power tool an overload protector should be included but then it would make the tool cost a little bit more and customers would howl. Not me, but a good many would howl about it.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Cordless Vs. Corded

                        For what this is worth, I tried this and it went along with no problems. Tool: Milwaukee 1660 1/2" spade handle drill and this is an old one.

                        Drill bits: Several different new condition 1-1/4" auger bits which were switched after drilling 12 or 13 holes.

                        Wood: Scraps of PT 4 x 4s from lumber yards and a contractor working in the area.

                        Also: A good heavy machinist bench vise to hold the wood. It's really fastened to my main bench.

                        Job: Drill 25 holes through the 4 x 4s and really work that old drill.

                        Result: Milwaukee 1660 drill is still laughing at me and telling me to really work it hard next test time. I got the workout. LOL
                        -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                        Part 2: Same as above only this time I used this ElCheepo 1/2" drill.
                        http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/cta...emnumber=47991

                        Result: This one was brand new and never finished. After 5-1/2 holes and without really being pushed, it blew up. The motor went up in smoke. It really did and I was happy to take it outside and put it in the trash. By the way it was a gift from someone and was sort of a joke. He knew I like to destroy junker tools for fun. I heard he got it on special as a display model. It was missing the side handle and was pretty dusty, but that was easy to solve.

                        Buy junk and get &&^%$ or buy quality and enjoy it for a long time. - me
                        Last edited by Woussko; 04-14-2007, 12:21 AM.

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                        • #13
                          Re: Cordless Vs. Corded

                          Originally posted by Woussko View Post

                          Buy junk and get &&^%$ or buy quality and enjoy it for a long time. - me

                          I couldn't agree more!!!

                          I think they should just close down all the HF stores. Period.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Cordless Vs. Corded

                            Newman, I would never miss H F -- It would be good riddance.

                            Here is a really crappy knock off copy of the same made here by Sioux. They know about it and all laugh. If you take both totally apart there is quite a difference, but from the outside they are very much the same other than for color.
                            http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/cta...emnumber=92956 (Real junker)

                            The origional that the above is a copy of is here on the home page. http://www.siouxtools.com/ This company is mostly into air powered tools, but they do make some electric drills. Some time back they made far more electric tools than they do today. At one time Milwaukee contracted with them to make what I call "Duck Shape" drills for them. Milwaukee called them "Close Quarters" drills. Today Milwaukee has them but they are being made in TTI factories over in China anymore.

                            (The origional and only real T shape 3/8" drill in if you ask me.) Yes, Sears had them made under contract and called them "The Mini T". For a few years Sears was the only place you could buy one, but then that changed so that today you can buy it wearing the proper name and that's not Crapsman. LOL

                            Now I really should leave this thread alone as my 2 last postings are off subject too much.
                            Last edited by Woussko; 04-14-2007, 03:15 PM.

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                            • #15
                              Re: Cordless Vs. Corded

                              Woussko
                              yeah I'm familiar with Sioux. They've been around for years and are very well known in the automotive repair shops. I remember the original metal housing close quarters drills.

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