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  • Bs1400

    As I often say, I work p/t at Home Depot. The other day I had a customer come in looking at the Ridgid BS (fitting initials arent they?) Naturally, being at work I cannot say this saw has been getting bad reviews due to various problems, so I advise the customer to search for it here. This guy was ready to purchase, but wanted a little more info, that I didnt know offhand (HD training? whats that??) so I again referred him here.

    He did notice right away that the motor prevents the lower door from opening. Our display (for almost a year now) also has a broken support where the angle adjusts, so I think he was a little leary at that point.

    I hope that eventually there is a new model coming out, as the BS is the only Ridgid tool that I cannot honestly endorse. I cant tell a person that Ive heard bad things, so if someone comes in ready to buy one they are on their own. I guess as far a customer satisfaction goes, it is a good thing that our display is broken, as it makes people think twice before buying it.

  • #2
    Re: Bs1400

    I seriously considered the Rigid BS but as I looked at the store model I ended up with a bad impression. The welds on the lower frame were ugly. Whom ever worked that saw didn't have any pride in their work, scared me away. Now, after reading all the remarks I'm glad I didn't buy it. I did go to Sears and bought the 14" professional BS and couldn't be happier. It has an 8" resaw capacity, down side is cannot add a riser block for more height.
    If at first you don't succeed, try reading the owners manual.

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    • #3
      Re: Bs1400

      Well, I bought the BS1400. Probably wasn't my wisest decision...but I've got to live with it. I did replace the blade and the motor belt. Those two items make it a capable saw, and I've been able to resaw with it. That being said...I think I got lucky and got one that's relatively well-balanced. The wheels seem to be at least close to balanced. It'll be the first tool I replace when I get a chance to. I'd like to have more resaw ability, but I don't want to put a riser block on a saw I'm sure I'm going to replace.
      I put it all back together better than before. There\'s lots of leftover parts.

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      • #4
        Re: Bs1400

        I'd sure like to have a nice large band saw with resaw capability. I had a 9" bench top model and it was totally useless. I need to resaw a few dozen 4x4 posts down to a net size of 3x3 for a job coming up soon , and a band saw would really do the job. I'm debating if I should just put the milling cost that the lumber yard wants to do the resawing, towards the purchse of a new BS...

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        • #5
          Re: Bs1400

          Don't forget that after you cut them, you'll have to sand them. Any bandsaw is going to leave a rather ragged surface. You might want to think about using the TS to cut those down.

          Set the fence to 3 inches. Set the blade to 2and1/8" (you want it just over half of the thickness of the post). Run the board through, making the first part of the cut. Flip it over and repeat the same cut, with the blade now cutting through the material. Repeat for the other dimension.

          Take the money you saved from the mill and buy a bandsaw!!!
          I put it all back together better than before. There\'s lots of leftover parts.

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          • #6
            Re: Bs1400

            Sandy

            One way or another you really need to get into the back room of Skarie, Inc. over in Baltimore. They have some real beasts in the way of used band saws for sale and the last time I was there (several months ago) a few serious band saws that might be more your size. They also sell lots of nice new ones if you have your $$$ saved up. There are other good dealers of woodworking machinery and I'm sure there's some closer to you.

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            • #7
              Re: Bs1400

              Originally posted by VASandy View Post
              Don't forget that after you cut them, you'll have to sand them. Any bandsaw is going to leave a rather ragged surface. You might want to think about using the TS to cut those down.

              Set the fence to 3 inches. Set the blade to 2and1/8" (you want it just over half of the thickness of the post). Run the board through, making the first part of the cut. Flip it over and repeat the same cut, with the blade now cutting through the material. Repeat for the other dimension.

              Take the money you saved from the mill and buy a bandsaw!!!

              I actually need the lumber to be rough. I was thinking of using a low tooth-count blade, and possibly offsetting a couple of the teeth to rip up the wood a bit...

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              • #8
                Re: Bs1400

                Originally posted by Newman View Post
                I actually need the lumber to be rough. I was thinking of using a low tooth-count blade, and possibly offsetting a couple of the teeth to rip up the wood a bit...
                What you can also do is cut it on the table saw, then if you want a rough surface pull your 3x3 backwards at a slight angle to the blade of your portable BS. The more angle and the faster you pull it back will determine the roughness you end up with, so do a little experimenting first. If Im not understanding correctly, and you dont have a BS you can also get similar results from a jig saw

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