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Compressor problem

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  • Compressor problem

    I have an oil free twin stack compressor that when I try to use it (to pump a tire or blow off some dust etc) it loses line pressure down to 10-15psi within 3-4 seconds and comes back up to 110 when I let off the nozzle. It works fine for a brad nailer but is aggravating that I can't even pump a tire up with it. Any ideas of why it might do this?

  • #2
    Re: Compressor problem

    Sounds like water in the tanks.
    When seconds count, the police are only minutes away.

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    • #3
      Re: Compressor problem

      I presume that the compressor comes on when the pressure drops to about 80 or 90 psi, but that it can't keep up as you continue to release the air. The pressure should never drop below what you are putting into the tire... that is to say that if you're inflating a tire to 30 psi, even with the compressor unplugged, the tank pressure should at worse reach a balance with the tire (30 psi).

      You don't have very much capacity to begin with only 4.5 gallons of air storage, but it certainly ought to be more than enough to enflate a car tire. (A "semi" might be more of a challenge!). If, as previously stated, you haven't drained the moisture from your tanks, this can greatly reduce your air storage capacity. You really must get in the habit of draining any condensate after each and every use. Such moisture not only diminishes your capacity, but also will corrode your tank... and I guarantee you that you don't want to be anywhere in the vacinity should a tank ever explode.

      Using an airgun or nozzle to blow away dust and dirt will drain your tank very fast. While these small compressor are more than enough to drive a couple of nailers, there is very little capacity when blowing the air out of the tank for other uses.

      I hope this helps,

      CWS

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      • #4
        Re: Compressor problem

        Just a thought but are you sure that you don't have the pressure regulator set too low?
        Teach your kids about taxes..........eat 30 percent of their ice cream.

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        • #5
          Re: Compressor problem

          I know it is not water in the tanks because I have checked that numerous times. the outlet pressure that drops immediately. The motor does not come on when the pressure drops like that because the pressure inside the tank remains the same. It has me baffled. To me it has to be something after the regulator or the regulator itself.

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          • #6
            Re: Compressor problem

            I agree that the problem is probably regulator related. If the pressure in the tank is still sufficient that the motor doesn't kick in then it almost has to be.
            Teach your kids about taxes..........eat 30 percent of their ice cream.

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            • #7
              Re: Compressor problem

              Danraz,

              If I understand you correctly, the tank pressure does NOT drop at all and the motor does NOT come on, and that only the pressure in the hose (after the regulator) is what is dropping?

              If so, then either you have some kind of blockage in the line before the regulator or else the regulator has debris in it and not allowing the air to pass through. It's function shouldn't be any different regardless of what tool you have attached.

              What I don't understand is the fact that enough air is passing into the hose to allow the manual regulator to be set and the hose to be pressurized. If the regulator was only partially blocked, the hose could be drained easily of its pressure, but would immediately start to repressurize when you stopped using the tool. It would be a constant cycle of draining the hose pressure, waiting a few seconds and then using it again. The tank would continually resupply the hose, even though the regulator passage was partially blocked. Eventually the tank would drain pressure to a point that the automatic pressure switch would restart the compressor.

              If you have a complete blockage then there should be little or no pressure in the hose and the pressure regulator would be difficult or impossible to adjust.

              Hopefully you are still under warranty and can have this serviced. If not, and you are going to service the compressor yourself, you will need to shut off the compressor, drain the pressure from the tank, and remove the regulator for inspection. BEFORE you attempt to remove the regulator, pop the safety valve(s) to ensure there is no pressure in the line between the pressure switch and the regulator.

              It is extremely important that the pressure be drained from the compressor tank and any piping and that the compressor is unplugged. On most compressors, the tank pressure is present throughout the compressor system. Attempting to remove the regulator without draining the tank and it's related piping is dangerous! Ensure that the tank pressure is drained and that any line pressure is removed via the safety valves.

              There isn't much you can do to the regulator other than inspect the ports to see that they are clean. After cleaning, re-install the regulator and see if it works okay. If the same problem persists, I'd replace it. Fortunately they are inexpensive and widely available.

              I hope this helps,

              CWS

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Compressor problem

                If this output regulator was one you installed yourself, or you had reason to remove the factory supplied output regulator and used Teflon tape or pipe dope -AND- you were not careful when applying the tape or dope that could also lead to your regulator problem. After a while a piece of Teflon tape or a small glob of pipe dope could work loose and get inside the regulator causing it to malfunction. Regulators of the type and quality used on these small compressors are not usually worth the time to repair them, especially if you have never had one apart before. Best to replace in kind if you determine that it is the cause of your problem.
                ---------------
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                • #9
                  Re: Compressor problem

                  blockage of some type, in the line between the tank and before the hose.
                  could be in a regulator or some type of valve, or other.
                  Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
                  ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
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                  attributed to Samuel Johnson
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                  • #10
                    Re: Compressor problem

                    i would think that it's an issue with the quick couplers on the air hose or air chuck connection. try removing the quick couplers and hook it up without the quick couplers. usually 1/4'' npt.

                    rick.
                    phoebe it is

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Compressor problem

                      Danraz

                      If you have a trigger type blow gun please try this and then post the results.

                      1. Let compresor run until it shuts off

                      2. With no air flowing through regulator, hose or blow gun, set regulator to 25-30

                      3. Looking at the gauge on the regulator, very slowly depress the trigger so only a little air flows.

                      4. Note gauge reading

                      5. Now press the trigger fully and let the air blast out of the blow gun

                      6. Now what does the gauge on the regulator say?

                      7. You might try the above but with the regulator set for say 70 with no air flowing and see what happens.

                      Be sure to think safety. Wear your safety glasses and respect that air under pressure can be dangerous. As others have said, be 100% sure there is NO pressure in the tank(s) or hoses before you start to take things appart. And, be sure to Blow the safety releif valves about once a week to keep them free from dirt.

                      I think Bob has the idea of there being some dirt inside the regulator. Normally the smaller (for the DIYer) ones really aren't worth fixing up.

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                      • #12
                        Re: Compressor problem

                        I have tried playing with the pressure regulator numerous times and the result is the same. 2-3 seconds after you depress the air nozzle the pressure drops to 10psi or less. You let off and the pressure goes back up. You can even feel it in the hose. It is almost as though the high pressure I get at the very beginning is from what is in the hose and once the hose is drained it goes down to the 10psi. Where can I get a new regulator and how much is the avg. cost?

                        Thanks for all you guy's help

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Compressor problem

                          You can find those regulators at all of the big box stores and auto parts stores. I would figure on spending somewhere in the $20 range. In the past, I've tried some of the cheaper ones but they don't last.
                          Teach your kids about taxes..........eat 30 percent of their ice cream.

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                          • #14
                            Re: Compressor problem

                            Originally posted by PLUMBER RICK View Post
                            i would think that it's an issue with the quick couplers on the air hose or air chuck connection. try removing the quick couplers and hook it up without the quick couplers. usually 1/4'' npt.

                            rick.

                            why is no one else suggesting to remove the air couplers?

                            i've had a mismatched set in the past that caused this problem. why not just unscrew the air coupler from the regulator and let it rip. it's possible it's the regulator, but also very likely an air hose quick coupler.

                            give it a try.

                            rick.
                            phoebe it is

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: Compressor problem

                              I don't think it is the quick coupler simply because it does the same thing with either one. If it did it on one side only then I would suspect the coupler. I will try a new regulator and see what it does. I will also remove the quick coupler and let you know after I try tonight.

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