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  • blade guard safety- circular saw

    I use a Ridgid r3200 circular saw.Is it proper safety technique to slide the guard fordward before cutting so that the bottom of the guard doesn't hit the wood and prevent the saw from moving thru the cut? Ihave been told this is done by some people.

  • #2
    Re: blade guard safety- circular saw

    My old-school Craftsman and Skil circ saws have a tab or lever sticking out from the guard just for this purpose. I just looked at a photo of your saw online and it has this tab and that's exactly what it's for. You are supposed to raise the guard just enough to get the base of the saw onto the stock and then let go of the tab - you don't need to keep holding it.

    Be safe,
    Chiz
    Later,
    Chiz

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    • #3
      Re: blade guard safety- circular saw

      You should normally not have to mess with the blade guard to cut. The guard is designed so it will automatically move and adjust as you start the cut. Keep your hands firmly on the grips and don't mess with the guard tab while you cut. In some odd cuts the guard might bind and not move out of the way, then you have to help it out a bit with the tab. The only time you really need to move it completely out of the way and hold it there is to start a plunge cut. Some guards are also designed better than others and tend to bind more. I have the Ridgid saw and have normally never had problems with the guard binding.

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      • #4
        Re: blade guard safety- circular saw

        Ditto what Velosapien said. Don't manually raise it unless you have to. The hand not pulling the trigger is better used holding the work secure, or helping steady the saw on the front knob. Starting the cut is usually the most dangerous time for a catch or kickback. That is not the time to have your free hand close to the blade and the blade unguarded. (Plunge cuts or severe angle cuts being the exceptions). If the guard is hanging up on the wood (usually thin stuff), first try lowering the shoe plate so not as much of the blade is through the wood. That can also reduce tearout on the top side of the wood.

        Go
        Last edited by Gofor; 06-26-2007, 08:09 PM.
        Practicing at practical wood working

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