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  • #16
    Re: Ryobi Lithium Ion Tools Coming

    Originally posted by cellardoor View Post
    They can. They will be selling a charger and one 18v lithium battery for about $100. The new charger will also charge your current 18v batteries.
    So the foot print of the battery will be the same?

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    • #17
      Re: Ryobi Lithium Ion Tools Coming

      Ryobi will never be built as well as its higher end counterparts. They are designed to be inferior on purpose. Even if they can build them far better for same for the same cost they won't. There is a market segment they need to fill and they will not make them good enough to compete against themselves with the more expensive Ridgid or Milwaukee line. There probably is no good reason for the batteries to have such a relatively low amp hour rating but the higher capacity batteries are reserved to distinguish the high end products.

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      • #18
        Re: Ryobi Lithium Ion Tools Coming

        Originally posted by Frankiarmz View Post
        I agree Ryobi is not as good when it comes to quailty compared to the Ridgid line. I was looking at the new Ridgid 18volt lithium Ion drill today at Home Depot and for $179.00 I get two lion batteries and the new charger too which will fit all my Ridgid 18volt nicad tools. I called Ridgid tech support and was told the amp hour on the lion battery is 3.0, not bad compared to the 2.4 MAX HC nicad, at it will hold a charge longer too. Anyone with differing information please post. The lion battery is smaller and lighter than the MAX HC and I hope they told me the right information. Thanks.

        Wow, surprising to hear that the 18 volt li-on is 3.0AH. The 24 volt is so much larger and same capacity. Good Job RIDGID.
        http://www.cgiconnection.com/download

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        • #19
          Re: Ryobi Lithium Ion Tools Coming

          Originally posted by Frankiarmz View Post
          I agree Ryobi is not as good when it comes to quailty compared to the Ridgid line. I was looking at the new Ridgid 18volt lithium Ion drill today at Home Depot and for $179.00 I get two lion batteries and the new charger too which will fit all my Ridgid 18volt nicad tools. I called Ridgid tech support and was told the amp hour on the lion battery is 3.0, not bad compared to the 2.4 MAX HC nicad, at it will hold a charge longer too. Anyone with differing information please post. The lion battery is smaller and lighter than the MAX HC and I hope they told me the right information. Thanks.
          The MaxHC battery is only 1.9Ah. The Max 2.5 is 2.5Ah. Before the MaxHC, Ridgid 18V batteries were only 1.4Ah. The new Ridgid 18v lithium is 3Ah....same as the 24v line.

          Ryobi 18v batteries are 1.7Ah, their older batteries were 1.2Ah. The new Ryobi claims to have twice the life. That should be possible wit the 2.4Ah battery since LiIon run longer for the same power rating because they have a flatter curve and less power loss under load.

          I have an entire set of Ryobi tools. They make nice backups or for lighter jobs. I will definitely pick up their Lithium upgrade kit.
          Last edited by Disaster; 09-26-2007, 06:58 AM.

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          • #20
            Re: Ryobi Lithium Ion Tools Coming

            Originally posted by l_bilyk View Post
            See the thing is, ryobi packs are designed to have a short battery life. The cells in there are antiquated 1200 mAh (i think) sub c. The price difference between one of those and something around 2100 mAh is negligible especially if you're buying in bulk like TTI. Ryobi is now going to offer lithium ion but why only 2.4 Ah?! That can be easily done with NiCad cells
            Ryobi hasn't sold 1.2Ah packs in years. The ones they sell today are 1.7Ah. 2.5Ah is pretty darn good, actually. As was mentioned, they have to keep them one step below the Ridgid line.

            The tools, on the other hand, are generally very cheaply made compared to Ridgid and DeWalt. They are closer in quality to Black and Decker. You notice the "cheapness" more with more expensive tools (like the reciprocating saw) because they try to keep all tools within a $30-$60 dollar price point and the higher cost tools suffer the most from this cost cutting.
            Last edited by Disaster; 09-26-2007, 06:59 AM.

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            • #21
              Re: Ryobi Lithium Ion Tools Coming

              Originally posted by Paladin2025 View Post
              What size do you guys think that circ saw blade is? Do you think they kept the old 5 1/2 saw size?
              The tools all appear to be "carry over", with just a color change.

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              • #22
                Re: Ryobi Lithium Ion Tools Coming

                Originally posted by Disaster View Post
                The tools all appear to be "carry over", with just a color change.

                It isn't a 'carryover' All 4 tools are of a design I have never seen from Ryobi. I can confirm the the circ. saw. size is 5 1/2" and I was a bit disappointed with that. Where the battery loads in the circ. saw is something I have never seen in another 'pod' style battery' tool and personally i like it a lot better and seems more compact.

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                • #23
                  Re: Ryobi Lithium Ion Tools Coming

                  On a a ladder I've dropped $250 drills to cement pavement.
                  I've also dropped $50 drills.
                  They both break.
                  I've owned a Ryobi 18v for 4 years, first one burnt out after 2 years when I was drilling 1-1/2" holes on a large residential gas job not from being dropped or mishandled..it burnt out.
                  A $250 drill would likely have burnt also, but I'd guess you'd get more life from it.
                  Would you get 500% more?
                  Homeowners & DIY'ers are attracted to what appears to be powerful, bright or shiney.
                  I'd rather put the money in a CD.
                  There are two advantages to using LI over NiCad or Nimh, it's lighter and the batteries have no memory.
                  Not enough difference for me to run out right away and restock my whole cordless "wardrobe" just yet.
                  As for Ryobi's new look on the LI, it's almost insulting.

                  But then there's DeWalts bright yellow....

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Re: Ryobi Lithium Ion Tools Coming

                    Originally posted by cellardoor View Post
                    It isn't a 'carryover' All 4 tools are of a design I have never seen from Ryobi. I can confirm the the circ. saw. size is 5 1/2" and I was a bit disappointed with that. Where the battery loads in the circ. saw is something I have never seen in another 'pod' style battery' tool and personally i like it a lot better and seems more compact.
                    Though "carryover" might be going a little too far, I don't see anything in the tools that looks better....just shaped a little differently. I strongly suspect the motors and drives are very similar if not exactly the same.

                    While all Ryobis are good values, many are more limited in capability, while others are downright abusive to use. For example the reciprocating saw is a lightweight, buzzing, shaking beast that does half as much damage to your hand as it does to what you are cutting. On the other hand, their little impact wrench works great.

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                    • #25
                      Re: Ryobi Lithium Ion Tools Coming

                      Originally posted by DuckButter View Post
                      On a a ladder I've dropped $250 drills to cement pavement.
                      I've also dropped $50 drills.
                      They both break.
                      I've owned a Ryobi 18v for 4 years, first one burnt out after 2 years when I was drilling 1-1/2" holes on a large residential gas job not from being dropped or mishandled..it burnt out.
                      A $250 drill would likely have burnt also, but I'd guess you'd get more life from it.
                      Would you get 500% more?
                      Homeowners & DIY'ers are attracted to what appears to be powerful, bright or shiney.
                      I'd rather put the money in a CD.
                      There are two advantages to using LI over NiCad or Nimh, it's lighter and the batteries have no memory.
                      Not enough difference for me to run out right away and restock my whole cordless "wardrobe" just yet.
                      As for Ryobi's new look on the LI, it's almost insulting.

                      But then there's DeWalts bright yellow....
                      I've gone through quite a few tools in my lifetime too...and like to take them apart when they fail. I can tell you there is a huge difference between cheap and expensive tools and it is one of the reasons the more expensive tools last longer, are more efficient, and are more comfortable to use.

                      Some of the things you will find on more expensive tools.
                      • More and better bearings and bushings
                      • Vibration reducing technologies...like flywheels and offset weights.
                      • Better motors with improved cooling and bearings instead of bushings
                      • Thicker battery leads and cooling panels and vents on the batteries.
                      • Replaceable service parts like bearings and brushes

                      All of these things make the tool last longer, and be able to be pushed harder without failing.

                      While this isn't as important to a homeowner, or weekend handyman, who might take his drill out once or twice a year, it makes a huge difference to a contractor who might be up a ladder chasing in lag bolts for two hours...day after day.

                      Ryobi tools are a great value and definitely have their place in the market. Many might even be acceptable for some contractors who don't abuse their tools so much and don't mind running out to the store for a replacement if need be.

                      As far as the dropping thing, it generally does get better with more expensive tools, but some manufacturers design better for this...even in high end tools. For example Bosch does drop tests on their tools and they have a reputation for being able to take several story falls in stride. I've read of Hitachi drills, on the other hand, snapping, at the handle, when dropped 4 feet.

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                      • #26
                        Re: Ryobi Lithium Ion Tools Coming

                        My first post--

                        I am a new homeowner in the middle of building firewood racks out of pressure treated lumber. I have a 6 year old dewalt 9.9 (9.6?)V driver, and it mightily struggled with drilling the 1/2" holes needed to put in the lag bolts to hold this thing together. After charging both batteries 6 times during a morning working, I decided I needed an serious upgrade. I'm not a contractor, but just a weekend wannabe handyman that has a whole slew of projects with a new-to-me 30 year old home. So, I face the perpetual tool dilemma--the prospect of buying more than you need, but wanting reliability and the tool to work every time. I take good care of my stuff, but the poor little dewalt was taxed beyond its capability on this project.

                        I went down to the Home Depot thinking I would buy a corded Ridgid 3/8" drill--my projects will all be within the yard, and i'll always have power. At $57, it really seemed to fit the bill. But, the 18v Li-Ion Ridgid drill caught my eye. I've got a ridgid shop-vac, but that's the only Ridgid brand equipment I have, and frankly had been a little nervous about buying their battery tools based on Consumer Reports' review that the batteries did not last as long as other companies' offerings.

                        While looking at the Ridgid 18v Li-Ion, the tool salesman started chatting with me. I told him the above--my needs and uses, and he steered me to the Ryobi Li-Ion. I said "moreso than the Ridgid?" He said "Yes, Indeed."

                        I came here to learn-up on the varying tools, etc. and hope to make the right choices as I get started, but I was surprised the HD man would push Ryobi over the Ridgid, when it's not their brand, and it was $20 cheaper.

                        I haven't made my decision yet, but that Ryobi set sure looks good now that I study it, but I sure like the assurance of the Ridgid free battery program, too.

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Re: Ryobi Lithium Ion Tools Coming

                          Originally posted by funkymonkey1111 View Post
                          My first post--

                          I am a new homeowner in the middle of building firewood racks out of pressure treated lumber. I have a 6 year old dewalt 9.9 (9.6?)V driver, and it mightily struggled with drilling the 1/2" holes needed to put in the lag bolts to hold this thing together. After charging both batteries 6 times during a morning working, I decided I needed an serious upgrade. I'm not a contractor, but just a weekend wannabe handyman that has a whole slew of projects with a new-to-me 30 year old home. So, I face the perpetual tool dilemma--the prospect of buying more than you need, but wanting reliability and the tool to work every time. I take good care of my stuff, but the poor little dewalt was taxed beyond its capability on this project.

                          I went down to the Home Depot thinking I would buy a corded Ridgid 3/8" drill--my projects will all be within the yard, and i'll always have power. At $57, it really seemed to fit the bill. But, the 18v Li-Ion Ridgid drill caught my eye. I've got a ridgid shop-vac, but that's the only Ridgid brand equipment I have, and frankly had been a little nervous about buying their battery tools based on Consumer Reports' review that the batteries did not last as long as other companies' offerings.

                          While looking at the Ridgid 18v Li-Ion, the tool salesman started chatting with me. I told him the above--my needs and uses, and he steered me to the Ryobi Li-Ion. I said "moreso than the Ridgid?" He said "Yes, Indeed."

                          I came here to learn-up on the varying tools, etc. and hope to make the right choices as I get started, but I was surprised the HD man would push Ryobi over the Ridgid, when it's not their brand, and it was $20 cheaper.

                          I haven't made my decision yet, but that Ryobi set sure looks good now that I study it, but I sure like the assurance of the Ridgid free battery program, too.




                          frist off welcome to the group, secondly, ryobi makes a darn good tool for a home owner and they have a very large selation of tools to chosse from, but the down side is some of they tools are very under powered(some not all) but i agree that the ridgid line is a tad pricey (for a homeowner/hobbiest) but you get what you pay for, also the ridgid line has a lifetime service agreement on the tools and the batterys as long as you regerster the tools so that is something to think about also
                          9/11/01, never forget.

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                          • #28
                            Re: Ryobi Lithium Ion Tools Coming

                            Funky, as a new homeowner you have plenty of options and OSC made some good points. If you are just looking for a drill and guaranteed performance with no future inventment in batteries, then get a good corded drill and have fun, however if you are planning to do diverse tasks around that house and property you have a lot of decisions to make. Do you want to invest the least amount of money on a starter set of cordless tools to learn on? I'd go with the Ryobi, decent quality for the money and if you bang them up along the way no great loss. If you are good with tools but just haven't had your own house or tools and want to invest in something that will perform better and last longer you have to step up and spend more money. I don't think there have ever been more choices in good cordless tools and batteries. All of this can lead to confusion, but these "threads" have already provided lots of useful information. Unless you are planning to hire contractors or handymen to do most of your repairs, it's a good idea to have a variety of tools to make all the various jobs easier. Cordless circular saw for cutting trim wood or small projects, reciprocating saw for tight spaces, even handy for plumbing and auto work, of course "The Drill". I would probably spend closer to $400.00 and get stronger and better quality tools. I would choose lithium ion batteries for their ability to hold a charge longer than nicads, no problems with memory and stronger performance during use. I like my Ridgid tools and I think the warranty is a good feature. All considered I don't think you could make a bad choice among the top brands if you tried, they will all be more than a homeowner would need. Best of luck with your new home and let us know how you do with the tool decision.

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Re: Ryobi Lithium Ion Tools Coming

                              Originally posted by funkymonkey1111 View Post
                              ...I was surprised the HD man would push Ryobi over the Ridgid, when it's not their brand, and it was $20 cheaper.
                              Home Depot has the exclusive rights to sell Ryobi and Ridgid. Neither are their brand.

                              Ryobi is aimed more at the homeowner and casual user. There tools are going to take the abuse that a day to day contractor might put them through as well as a Ridgid or DeWalt.

                              For your use, the Ryobi OnePlus line might be a great match. I have quite a few tools in their line and they vary in quality vs. contractor grade tools, but some are quite good. I have contractor grade tools too, but Ryobi fills the gaps for tools I use less...like right angle drills and impact driver.

                              I agree that you may want to consider getting some quality corded tools before you invest in cordless. You will get more power, and not have to worry about battery maintenance.

                              Depending on the work you may tackle, you might also consider bumping up to a good 1/2" corded drill...as opposed to that 3/8". It won't cost that much more for a good quality 1/2" and they are more versatile. Your little 9.6v DeWalt might be a nice companion to it, for all those jobs where you don't need power.

                              Good luck,
                              Danny

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Re: Ryobi Lithium Ion Tools Coming

                                Funky,
                                For your purposes, I think the Ryobi lithium drill is a good recommendation for you. I tried the drill today at HD. I drilled a bunch of 3/8" holes in a block of pine using the high speed setting. it did quite well, only hesitating slightly as the hole got to about 4" deep. I was impressed.

                                I'd consider the drill kit ($159) and the Ryobi (P230) impact driver for $69 since you are working with lag screws and such (you'll be amazed at the power).

                                OSC is correct in saying, "you get what you pay for" and this is absolutely true. But I think that in the case of Ryobi cordless tools, you actually do get an exceptional value, and some pretty darn good tools for the price.

                                You might also consider the Makita compact lithium kit for $269 at HD. That is a screaming deal, even compared to Amazon.com. I have the Makita compact drill and impact although I bought them separately over time. The Makita is a higher end tool for just a bit more if you are considering both the Ryobi drill and impact both. But the Ryobi batteries have a higher capacity than the "compact" Makita's.

                                What ever you choose, I'd stay clear of any Black & Decker, Black & Decker Firestorm, Skil, Kawasaki (from Costco), Denali, Worx, GMC, or Harbor Freight cordless tools. I think those cordless tools are just plain ripoffs.

                                Good luck,
                                Ern

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