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18v Ridgid cordless drills, battteries & torque

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  • #31
    Re: 18v Ridgid cordless drills, battteries & torque

    Originally posted by Sceeter W Wheels View Post
    Actually there are AA sized lithium cells that put out 1.5V and are drop-in replacements for the usual AA alkalines. I forget who makes them (I believe it's Energizer or one of those big companies). They are not rechargeable though.
    Yeah, but like you said, they aren't rechargeable. The Lithium non-rechargeables are about the least cost effective batteries you can buy.

    Comment


    • #32
      Re: 18v Ridgid cordless drills, battteries & torque

      Originally posted by Sceeter W Wheels View Post
      The jist that I have heard from that scene is that the A123 cells kick major a-ss too.

      I don't think that DeWalt is exploiting the maximum capabilities of the cells though. They seem to limit the tools to a certain level (such as the circular saw battery protection phenomenon I mentioned in the other thread) probably with the intent of ensuring that the battery will last a long time. But I think the A123 cells can put out something like 70Amps. They can also be charged much faster than 1 hour as well. But typically when you start pushing things like that, the batteries will wear out faster in terms of charge cycles.
      A123 cells can push very high currents. Additionally, they can be drained much lower than traditional LithiumPoly cells. Their chemistry is also much less flammable so if they are shorted they won't blow up....unlike traditional LiIon cells which, if you've read the news you already know, have been the cause of many fires.

      DeWalts power limits might have nothing to do with the protecting the batteries. Motors and wiring have current limits. Perhaps the limits are to protect those other components.

      I'm curious at what technology batteries the other manufacturers are using...like Ryobi. There are other technologies/chemistries out there that have similar characteristics to A123, but several of the manufacturers of those where being sued by A123 for violating it's patents. If I recall, A123 licensed technologies or worked with MIT for the patents. They, in turn, were being sued by another U of Texas for violating it's patents. The whole thing could get real messy.

      http://271patent.blogspot.com/2006/0...r-lithium.html

      Comment


      • #33
        Re: 18v Ridgid cordless drills, battteries & torque

        Lots of good info on my first post here! __ Good news!

        Bad news __ I added a MaxSelect Recip saw (bare tool) and was ready to add the MaxSelect Impact Driver (bare tool). Then I saw the MaxSelect Starter Kit ($150.) and decided this is the way to go for the future.... NOT !!!!!

        Tried to buy an extra 24v Li-Ion battery. MUST be special ordered (per Ridgid). Bitched like hell (like buying a new car and being told I have to special order the gasoline!). Then called HD .... they had to check with Ridgid .... HD called back in one hour to inform me $187.50 for one battery and 8-12 weeks!

        I am now in 'reconsider' mode and may take time to evaluate the A123 battery comments made here earlier. I hestitate to make any ill-considered comments so soon so I'll simply note that it seems like Ridgid (and HD) has/have not got their battery program together yet.

        Regards,
        Tom B

        Comment


        • #34
          Re: 18v Ridgid cordless drills, battteries & torque

          This has been a long ongoing problem with Ridgid's 24v tools. There are a bunch of topics discussing the lack of availability of individual batteries. If you want these tools you should buy the 24v 3 piece kit (drill, recip saw, falsh light), or if you can get a hold of one, the original 4 piece with the circular saw. Its a lot more cost effective, a much better deal and cheaper than buying max select tools with starter kits.

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          • #35
            Re: 18v Ridgid cordless drills, battteries & torque

            Originally posted by doubtingtom View Post

            Tried to buy an extra 24v Li-Ion battery. MUST be special ordered (per Ridgid). Bitched like hell (like buying a new car and being told I have to special order the gasoline!). Then called HD .... they had to check with Ridgid .... HD called back in one hour to inform me $187.50 for one battery and 8-12 weeks!

            Regards,
            Tom B
            That is crazy considering they were selling the MaxSelect battery kit, R937, with charger and 24 volt battery for $150 during the Christmas sales. It's normal price was $200.

            http://www.ridgid.com/Tools/R937-24V...t/EN/index.htm

            If you are looking for individual tools you can find the best deals on Ebay (though you won't get the lifetime warranty.) People buy kits and part them out. You can find individual tools, chargers and batteries for much cheaper there. For example, I just did a search for the MaxSelect reciprocating saw on Ebay completed auctions and in the last week one sold for $76 and another for $82. Batteries were fetching a pretty high price, from $80 to $120...which is directly related to how expensive they are in the stores and how hard they are to find.
            Last edited by Disaster; 09-28-2007, 02:09 PM.

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            • #36
              Re: 18v Ridgid cordless drills, battteries & torque

              Originally posted by Velosapien View Post
              This has been a long ongoing problem with Ridgid's 24v tools. .... If you want these tools you should buy the 24v 3 piece kit (drill, recip saw, flash light), or if you can get a hold of one, the original 4 piece with the circular saw. Its a lot more cost effective, a much better deal and cheaper than buying max select tools with starter kits.
              There is a kit here at HD, but the drill is a hammer drill. I now need to figure out if I can use it effectively for my more limited routine tasks ... I am ignorant about this and do not know the possible negatives.

              Thanks and regards,
              Tom B

              Comment


              • #37
                Re: 18v Ridgid cordless drills, battteries & torque

                Don't worry about it being a hammerdrill. The function can be turned of and used as a regular drill/driver. Almost every high end drill is a hammerdrill. Most manufacturers don't even bother making non-hammer versions because it barely saves anything in cost, weight, or size. Most stores don't even bother stocking the non-hammer models either.

                Even if you don't need it, it's a good feature to have available. The day you actually need to drill into concrete, block, or brick you'll be stuck if you have a standard drill driver as it will pretty useless in that case.

                The 24v is a pretty big drill though so you might find it cumbersome for small everyday tasks. Unfortunately no one makes kits with compact drill/drivers.

                Comment


                • #38
                  Re: 18v Ridgid cordless drills, battteries & torque

                  Originally posted by Velosapien View Post
                  Don't worry about it being a hammerdrill. The function can be turned off and used as a regular drill/driver. Almost every high end drill is a hammerdrill. ............ <edit> ..........
                  The 24v is a pretty big drill though so you might find it cumbersome for small everyday tasks. Unfortunately no one makes kits with compact drill/drivers.
                  Many thanks!! I went back to HD, they had the 24v L-I kit, and priced down from $379. to $269. !! Recip saw, hammmer drill, light, (2) 24v L-I batts , charger, and tool bag. Seems like a really terrific deal .. BUT .. I always get nervous when the deal seems too good ... The 24v L-I system is new and could be problemmatical, yet with Ridgid's Lifetime Service on all the items, I should be pretty well protected ??

                  If my new 18v drill had HC 2.5AHr batteries I might have stayed there, but ...................... I did take out the hammer drill and it feels and looks almost identical to the 18v recently purchased.

                  If you experienced Ridgid pros feel this is the better way to go then I should be a happy camper.

                  Regards,
                  Tom B

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    Re: 18v Ridgid cordless drills, battteries &amp; torque

                    I've been using Ridgid 18 volt nicad tools with no complaints other than the batteries seeming to not last very long. I toyed around in HD with the 24volt lithium Ridgid and found it to be a bit heavy and clumsy. The 18volt lithium ion battery seems to be the best of both worlds, more steady power, no battery memory to consider, will hold the charge longer when not in use and at 2.9 AH? it's slightly better than the 2.5AH nicads. The price you mentioned for the 24 volt set was awfully low? Unless you really need the extra torque I'd go with the 18volt lithium and build from there. I like the hammer/drill strong and sturdy, but seriously if I had to do a lot of hammer drill work in my opinion Hilti is the way to go. No harm in having this extra feature on your drill for the rare occassion you may need it .

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Re: 18v Ridgid cordless drills, battteries &amp; torque

                      Originally posted by doubtingtom View Post
                      There is a kit here at HD, but the drill is a hammer drill. I now need to figure out if I can use it effectively for my more limited routine tasks ... I am ignorant about this and do not know the possible negatives.

                      Thanks and regards,
                      Tom B
                      Yep.......You're turning into the tool company dream guy. "What I have might not be good enough, maybe this bigger dog".
                      I started out with the 24 V LI set with the hammer drill, circ saw, recip saw, light, charger and two batteries just before new year cause it was on sale for $319.00 and included a free extra tool which I used to get the maxselect jigsaw.
                      Had to exchange the first set due to defective batteries. That problem seems to have been cured as I haven't seen any posts related to it lately.
                      The circ saw and recip saw are great with the 24V batteries as both of them like alot of power. The 24V hammer drill gets old fast unless you are doing deck work because of teh weight.
                      I purchased the 18V lith. Ion compact drill when it came out. Now the 24V hammer drill sits in the bag most of the time. The 18V LI compact is a dream. Light, powerfull, easy to handle.
                      Last but certainly not least is the maxselect impact tool. It makes driving big screws a dream especially overhead ot in any other tight spots. Just rattles the screw in with no torque on the elbow. Has a built in light like the compact drill for those tight dark spots up between rafters. I have only used the 18V LI battery with the impact tool and it is light and sweet.
                      I haven't used the jig saw much. I tried the planer and returned it because I couldn't get it to smooth the edge of a 1" board.
                      Extra 24V LI batteries are a joke so far. After waiting several months for HD to get some invevtory I sent an email to MY E-box. They returned an e-mail stating that HD could special order 24V LI batteries. Printed the email and went to HD customer service today. After trying to locate the battery on the HD computer system she called Ridgid.
                      Ridgid told her they had no process for HD to order individual batteries and the customer(me) would have to get the batteries from their national parts distributor.
                      The Home Depot customer service lady used her phone and we called 1-877-544-9253. The customer service person at the national parts dist. needed the part number which is 130377001. She then told me they could ship a 24V LI battery out today if for $199.00 plus shipping. I asked if that was for one or two batteries. She said "one" and I said "thank you very much" and hung up. That is totaly insane of course. Ridgid is not using much sense in their marketing process of these batteries. Fortunately I don't need it yet because I can mix the 24V LI and the 18V LI.
                      Anyway Tom, that's all I know. Last I knew you were agonizing over an entry level 18V nicad drill. Now you're hooked.
                      Good luck...Ray

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        Re: 18v Ridgid cordless drills, battteries &amp; torque

                        Originally posted by roadrashray View Post
                        Yep.......You're turning into the tool company dream guy. "What I have might not be good enough, maybe this bigger dog".
                        ............................. Now you're hooked.
                        Good luck...Ray
                        OK, now I'm starting to oscillate a bit ..... I'm starting to wonder if 24v L-I may not be like 14.4v NiCad ..... sort of a 'tweener' as the industry goes from very low v to 12v to 18v to 36v. That is my 'serious' immediate concern with the 24v kit <which I have not opened yet>. I will be weighing the hammer drill shortly to compare to my 18v drill/driver. In my hands they felt very similar. I identify strongly with your 18v L-I comments and feel that I could do well with that solution. The problem is much the same ....... what is availability of 18v L-I Ridgid batteries? (and the cost).

                        I really need to go back to 'basics' ..... 'I' don't get something for nothing ..... I could easily sit on my 18v 1/2" drill (HC 1.4AH batts) situation for some time (as the L-I scenario matures). My only risk is $90. .... to buy two 18v HV 2.5 AH batts at HD (in stock). Total investment is low and they are a 'proven' performer.

                        Dang! This is a challenge (= PITA).

                        Thanks guys ... I really do appreciate the perspectives and comments.

                        Regards,
                        Tom B

                        Comment


                        • #42
                          Re: 18v Ridgid cordless drills, battteries &amp; torque

                          Wrapping it up ?? !!

                          Many thanks for all the helpful comments and relevant experiences. All of my choices are reasonably good ones, but the 18v Li-Ion direction seems to be one I feel best about. For slightly more ($31.) than the 24v 'kit' I can get the 18v with 2 batts & charger and keep the MaxSelect Recip saw. I trade off work time with the saw but gain lighter weight with the drill. I weighed the 24v Hammer this morning at 4lb 11.5oz versus the 18v at 3lb 6.5oz (1lb 5oz heavier). The 24v batt is 4.5oz heavier making the total tool over 1lb 9oz heavier. Definitely a better choice for those who need it.

                          The most important thing is that I'm making an 'informed' choice and that is important.

                          Thanks and regards,
                          Tom B

                          Comment


                          • #43
                            Re: 18v Ridgid cordless drills, battteries &amp; torque

                            Originally posted by doubtingtom View Post
                            Wrapping it up ?? !!

                            Many thanks for all the helpful comments and relevant experiences. All of my choices are reasonably good ones, but the 18v Li-Ion direction seems to be one I feel best about. For slightly more ($31.) than the 24v 'kit' I can get the 18v with 2 batts & charger and keep the MaxSelect Recip saw. I trade off work time with the saw but gain lighter weight with the drill. I weighed the 24v Hammer this morning at 4lb 11.5oz versus the 18v at 3lb 6.5oz (1lb 5oz heavier). The 24v batt is 4.5oz heavier making the total tool over 1lb 9oz heavier. Definitely a better choice for those who need it.

                            The most important thing is that I'm making an 'informed' choice and that is important.

                            Thanks and regards,
                            Tom B
                            If you don't need the hammerdrill function...and most people don't (how often do you drill into concrete?) the 18 volt drill is probably a better option.

                            Also, IMHO, the 18 volt lithium battery is a more mature product. Ridgid made the mistake of integrating electronics in the 24 volt battery that constantly drain the battery. This negates one of the main advantages of Lithium...the batteries always being charged up when you need them. I haven't lived with the 18V batteries long enough to see whether they have the same problem but I notice they eliminated the battery check circuit so I wouldn't be surprised if they eliminated the energy sapping internal circuit as well. I'm seriously considering dismantling one of the 24 volt cells to see if I can install some type of switch that will disconnect the circuit for storage.

                            As far as your previous comment, I don't think 24 volt is just a middle step to 36 volt. I think the companies got into a little race of oneupmanship with these high voltages and they really are more of a niche product. Most people would trade a little power for a lot of portability. That is why you see lighter weight 14.4 and 18 volt tools increasing in popularity.
                            Last edited by Disaster; 09-29-2007, 12:31 PM.

                            Comment


                            • #44
                              Re: 18v Ridgid cordless drills, battteries &amp; torque

                              Subtle and quite relevant info. The tradeoffs are now pretty visible and I have another issue separating the 18v & 24v. Been driving composite deck trim screws all morning and it's a good time to break and head for HD.

                              Best regards,
                              Tom B

                              Comment


                              • #45
                                Re: 18v Ridgid cordless drills, battteries &amp; torque

                                Before you spend $90.00 for the twin pack 18volt nicads, consider that for $179.00 you get two 18volt lithium ions, charger and drill! Even if you don't need the drill you could probably get $50.00 for it and still keep the batteries and charger. From everything I'm reading the Lithium Ion Batteries make the nicads a thing of the past, so why invest more money in old technology? Longer run times, less discharge when not in use and no memory. I may get mine tomorrow or Monday.

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