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18v Ridgid cordless drills, battteries & torque

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  • #46
    Re: 18v Ridgid cordless drills, battteries & torque

    Just picked up the 18v Li-Ion drill kit at HD for $179. Drill weighs 3lb 6oz (same as 18v NiCad version) BUT 18v Li-Ion batt weighs only 1lb 1oz (and is notably 'thinner' than either the NiCad or 24v Li-Ion) !! That's close to 1lb lighter. This should be a very comfortable tool to handle.

    I'm not back to full sanity yet ..... 24v Li-Ion 3pc kit is still in the car (just in case ... ???? ). Already starting to wonder ..... the batts are so small, are they much lower AmpHr rating than the 24v Li-Ion? That could make a difference if they are down around 1.5 AHr and 24v is 3.0 ! Any definitive answers on this?

    Hopeless ...

    Tom B
    Last edited by doubtingtom; 09-29-2007, 04:47 PM. Reason: question

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    • #47
      Re: 18v Ridgid cordless drills, battteries & torque

      Originally posted by doubtingtom View Post
      Already starting to wonder ..... the batts are so small, are they much lower AmpHr rating than the 24v Li-Ion? That could make a difference if they are down around 1.5 AHr and 24v is 3.0 !

      Hopeless ...
      Tom B
      They are both 3Ah according to Ridgid. However, the 24 volt would have more power because it does deliver 24 volts. Power equals amps times volts times time. So the 30% more power. It also need 30% more cells, which is one of the reasons it is bigger. Having said that, Ridgid must be using more efficient cells in the 18 volt, or pack less in the battery...perhaps part of it can be explained by the lack of the some internal circuits in the 18 volt.

      Like I said, the 18 volt is a more mature product. I wonder if Ridgid will come out with a more compact and efficient 24 volt battery down the road?

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      • #48
        Re: 18v Ridgid cordless drills, battteries & torque

        Thanks for the spec update. So far just a few easy trim screws, but the drill seems to be running just a tad faster (higher pitch) and is a joy to handle.

        Seems like your thoughts on a 'more basic' 24v Li-Ion batt would make lots of sense. I don't fully understand the internal monitoring and 'cell balancing' process but perhaps the extra 24v cells require it to function properly?

        The 18v drill is a 'no brainer' for me, but I bet I would really appreciate the 24v batts on the Ridgid recip saw! Maybe a 'mixed' battery kit would make sense. Seems like that would cover lots of needs for 'home' users like me.

        Regards,
        Tom B

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        • #49
          Re: 18v Ridgid cordless drills, battteries & torque

          Tom,

          IMHO, you're best to do a mix, like what you're thinking of now. Keep the 18V lithium-ion compact drill - it is a real treat to use, and pays for itself in dividends based on the lack of wrist/hand/arm fatigue in using it. If you can afford to, keep the 3-piece 24V kit, or try to find yourself the 4-piece version of this one if you can. The 24volt tools are made all in the MaxSelect-capability now, I believe, so that you can use the 18V batteries on the recip, or flashlight, etc. (However, do NOT use the 24volt battery on the 18V compact drill - it won't let you, because the tabs don't line up for the bigger battery, but don't try it anyway). Also, that way, you now have 4 batteries - two 18volt (perfect for using with the drill, and the flashlight), and two 24volt (for using on the higher drain tools, like the recip). Return your MaxSelect tools - the ones, anyways, that you can get in the kit.

          If you are worried about the old problems with the 24volt batteries, don't worry about it. That's what the 3 year warranty, and then the LLSA, are for. Also, a few people are still upset about the first batch of 24volt batteries having a fair number of problems, but as someone said earlier, that seems to be a problem that has been corrected. Even if there's an issue with slow drain on the 24's, you still have an amazing shelf life with them, due to being lithium-ion batteries. And you'd have 2 batteries of each voltage - more than enough to tide you over while you work and maybe need to top one up on the charger, or even for the 1/2 hour that one would need to fully recharge.

          If you do the math, it is waaaaay more cost efficient to pick up the kit. You will appreciate the differences in the 2 different power levels with these batteries - they will be all you would need and more. And, if you don't feel that you would get a lot of use out of the 24V hammer drill, then sell it to a buddy who also has Ridgid tools, or on eBay. You'll probably get around $70 or $80 for it (solo, without batteries or chager). This now would make the kit that much better of a deal. And/or, use the money to pick up a MaxSelect impact driver (around $119 still, I believe). If you are flip-flopping around between the 18V compact and the 24V hammerdrill for the power advantages, but you don't actually intend on using it alot for actual cement/masonry drilling, then the MaxSelect impact is a perfect partner to go along with the 18V compact li-ion drill. If you do more than 20-30% of your driving with screws longer than 1 1/2 inches, then you'll really come to love the impact. It's a noisy mule, but using it with 3" deck screws or construction/framing screws, it is a pure dream. Once you use an impact, you never go back!
          Last edited by canucksartech; 09-30-2007, 08:18 AM. Reason: Brain fart

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          • #50
            Re: 18v Ridgid cordless drills, battteries & torque

            Originally posted by canucksartech View Post
            Tom,

            IMHO, you're best to do a mix, like what you're thinking of now. Keep the 18V lithium-ion compact drill - it is a real treat to use, and pays for itself in dividends based on the lack of wrist/hand/arm fatigue in using it. If you can afford to, keep the 3-piece 24V kit, or try to find yourself the 4-piece version of this one if you can. <edit> ......... the MaxSelect impact is a perfect partner to go along with the 18V compact li-ion drill. If you do more than 20-30% of your driving with screws longer than 1 1/2 inches, then you'll really come to love the impact. It's a noisy mule, but using it with 3" deck screws or construction/framing screws, it is a pure dream. Once you use an impact, you never go back!
            I really relate to your comments and am considering keeping both sets. No question, I would be in 'tool junky' heaven if I could do this and easily swap the hammer drill for the impact driver. Not so easy in my small town so the decision is a bit more difficult. The MaxSelect jig saw is also high on my list versus the hammer drill.

            Thanks for taking time to add your thoughts. No matter what, the helpful info in this thread has let me make much better choices.

            Regards,
            Tom B

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            • #51
              Re: 18v Ridgid cordless drills, battteries &amp; torque

              I had a long (face-to-face) talk with a serious tool junky and electrical contractor over the week-end. His comments must be tempered slightly given his age <40's> and strong, stocky build. He feels strongly about heavier, more powerful battery tools allowing him to do most jobs more quickly and effectively than with lighter, less 'torque_y' versions. He states this in the context that most of his work involves short 'stints' with different tools versus having to carry and continuously operate a single tool. He also feels strongly in favor of the 24v battery in spite of the monitoring circuitry, greater bulk and higher weight. Finally, he would opt for the Hammer Drill in virtually all cases and prefers it to a combination of drill and impact driver.

              I am notably older than this gentleman, but plenty big enough and strong enough to use the heavier tools without major discomfort. This, plus the many helpful comments in this thread are pushing me fairly hard to go with the Ridgid 24v 3pc L-I Kit ($269.). It is clearly not a 'black & white' choice, but with Ridgid's Lifetime Service program, I feel pretty well protected.

              This has been a long thread and I hesitate to 'beat the topic to death', but will surely appreciate any additional 'refining' comments which might add perspective so I can finalize things today.

              Best regards,
              Tom B

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              • #52
                Re: 18v Ridgid cordless drills, battteries &amp; torque

                Originally posted by canucksartech View Post
                Even if there's an issue with slow drain on the 24's, you still have an amazing shelf life with them, due to being lithium-ion batteries. And you'd have 2 batteries of each voltage - more than enough to tide you over while you work and maybe need to top one up on the charger, or even for the 1/2 hour that one would need to fully recharge.
                That hasn't been my experience. I use my 24 volt tools less often because I usually don't need that much power...say once every couple to three months. When I reach for them the batteries are always dead or nearly so. That isn't any better than conventional NiCds. Heck, I keep my NiCds in the refrigerator and in there, they actually hold up better than the Ridgid 24's. In comparison, my 14.4v lithium Panasonic and even my cheap B&D lithium drill are always full.

                If you are someone who uses your tools every day...or once a week...or maybe even once a month...you probably wouldn't find this too big a hassle. At my level I find it extremely annoying that I have to put the darn batteries on the charger for 20 minutes to get decent use out of them. I will either eventually dump the 24 volt tools altogether, or invalidate the warranty by dismantling the battery and installing a circuit disconnection switch.

                Plus, there is one other nagging thing that I worry about. Lithium Ion doesn't like to be drained below a particular voltage level. To do so, seriously damages the batteries. I wonder if the Ridgid battery circuit is smart enough not to overdrain the batteries. On top of that, there is a limited number of charge cycles in a Lithium battery. Everytime the internal circuit drains the battery you just used up a charge cycle. This is probably less of a concern than the low voltage drain because if a self discharge takes 2 months you are only talking about 6 charge cycles "lost" per year but it is still annoying.

                At this point the best preventative maintenance is to set up a schedule where you put the batteries back on the charger once a month. That is what I have started doing.
                Last edited by Disaster; 10-01-2007, 09:04 AM.

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                • #53
                  Re: 18v Ridgid cordless drills, battteries &amp; torque

                  Originally posted by Disaster View Post
                  That hasn't been my experience. I use my 24 volt tools less often because I usually don't need that much power...say once every couple to three months. When I reach for them the batteries are always dead or nearly so. That isn't any better than conventional NiCds.
                  CRUD!! Your scenario is also mine, so I must now go back to the 18v L-I drill/driver or consider a different manufacturer. My weekend contact also uses his tools daily so he would not have your perspective. Ridgid still seems like my best choice due to potential infrequent usage and the Lifetime Service program.
                  --------------------------------------------------------------------------

                  ** Your quote ** "At this point the best preventative maintenance is to set up a schedule where you put the batteries back on the charger once a month. That is what I have started doing."

                  Seems like this is what is a good program for quality Ni-Cads ..... wondering if I should just stay with the 'proven' HC2.5 AHr tools for the present.

                  Tom B
                  Last edited by doubtingtom; 10-01-2007, 09:11 AM. Reason: additional point

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                  • #54
                    Re: 18v Ridgid cordless drills, battteries &amp; torque

                    Disaster,

                    When did you purchase your 24volt stuff? I'm wondering if they have it corrected on the newer product. My dad has the full set that he bought back in March/April (plus portions of another set). He did a little wait-and-see test of his own where he let one fully-charged battery sit until the August holiday weekend, when he needed both batteries for a big job. He took one battery when he bought it, and fully charged it, and then sat it in a tool cupboard in his garage/shop. He took it out during this repair on the first weekend in August, and compared this battery to one that he had just freshly charged. Used both in the drill, one after another, to do a line of fencing. He said that the one that was sitting showed about a 3/4 charge when he started, and lasted about 70% to 85% when compared to the fresh one.

                    Not scientific, I know, but I'm wondering what kind of an issue fresher stock may come to play in this, if they've got this situation panned out more on the newer product, compared with earlier versions.

                    Comment


                    • #55
                      Re: 18v Ridgid cordless drills, battteries &amp; torque

                      Originally posted by doubtingtom View Post
                      I am notably older than this gentleman, but plenty big enough and strong enough to use the heavier tools without major discomfort.
                      It isn't so much whether you are strong enough as how much less convenient and ungainly heavier tools are. Once you've used a 2 and 1/2 pound drill for to hand curtain rods it feels downright silly to do the same job with a 7 pound Ridgid hammerdrill. Plus the larger drill is that much harder to carry on your belt or in your pocket and that much harder to fit in tight spaces.

                      If I could only have one drill it might be the Ridgid 24 but it might just as likely be a corded drill because that delivers power beyond any cordless. I'm not saying the 24 volt tool's power isn't great....just that it is probably least necessary in the drill. The circular saw and reciprocating saws benefit more.

                      Don't underestimate the usefulness and practicality of a nice lightweight drill. Once you have one you most likely will find the 24 volt Ridgid drill gathering dust at the bottom of your toolbox.

                      Comment


                      • #56
                        Re: 18v Ridgid cordless drills, battteries &amp; torque

                        Originally posted by canucksartech View Post
                        Disaster,

                        When did you purchase your 24volt stuff? I'm wondering if they have it corrected on the newer product. My dad has the full set that he bought back in March/April (plus portions of another set). He did a little wait-and-see test of his own where he let one fully-charged battery sit until the August holiday weekend, when he needed both batteries for a big job. He took one battery when he bought it, and fully charged it, and then sat it in a tool cupboard in his garage/shop. He took it out during this repair on the first weekend in August, and compared this battery to one that he had just freshly charged. Used both in the drill, one after another, to do a line of fencing. He said that the one that was sitting showed about a 3/4 charge when he started, and lasted about 70% to 85% when compared to the fresh one.

                        Not scientific, I know, but I'm wondering what kind of an issue fresher stock may come to play in this, if they've got this situation panned out more on the newer product, compared with earlier versions.
                        I'd like to see more comments like that. I bought mine around Xmas of last year. I bought several of the 4 piece sets on clearance because they were such a good deal. I haven't done very scientific studies myself, just pulled them out of the basement when needed and observed the short life. After a charge they seem pretty good.

                        I'd love it if it were a battery issue that Ridgid has been fixed because, with the lifetime warranty, I'd just get them replaced.

                        One other thing. I've found the battery gauge to not be that accurate. It will fall from 3 or 4 lines to 1 pretty fast on a low battery. It will also jump to 4 lines pretty fast when charging...giving a false reading of charge rate.

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                        • #57
                          Re: 18v Ridgid cordless drills, battteries &amp; torque

                          (viz-a-viz .. your comment) My DeWalt 3/8" corded drill is what makes this choice harder for me. Your comment brings the new Bosch 10.8v L-I drill/driver into the picture. There is just no easy battery selection for Ridgid's neat Impact Driver as an alternative.

                          Tom B
                          Last edited by doubtingtom; 10-01-2007, 09:20 AM. Reason: error

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                          • #58
                            Re: 18v Ridgid cordless drills, battteries &amp; torque

                            Originally posted by doubtingtom View Post
                            Seems like this is what is a good program for quality Ni-Cads ..... wondering if I should just stay with the 'proven' HC2.5 AHr tools for the present.
                            IMHO, even at $100, the Max2.5 is not as good a deal as the 18 volt lithium ion set at $180. I will use the lighter lithium tool much more often than the 7 pound hammer drill. Plus, the lithium batteries are 3Ah and they do appear to be holding their charge (though I only bought mine a month ago so I need more time to evaluate this.)

                            The Ridgid 18 volt lithium drill set is about the best deal out there right now in a lithium drill. Ryobi has one now and B&D makes one without a built in battery (can be serviced by owner) which are great values but considerably below the Ridgid drill in terms of ruggedness. If you look at the other tools the comparison gets worse. The Ryobi reciprocating saw is a toylike joke compared to the Ridgid.

                            Also, Google for a HomeDepot or Lowes 10% off coupon. You email them and they either email them back to you in a couple weeks or mail them to your home. HD honors Lowes coupons.

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                            • #59
                              Re: 18v Ridgid cordless drills, battteries &amp; torque

                              For my 'restricted' scenario you have really hit the key points and I already have the tried the Ridgid 18v L-I drill. For the puny extra $31. it seems to offer much, much more than the Bosch 10.8v. Lots of minor compromises trying to fit all into one tool, but I agree with you Ridgid 18v L-I preference.

                              Tedious process, but it feels good to have time and sound inputs to sort out the right result.

                              Regards,
                              Tom B
                              Last edited by doubtingtom; 10-01-2007, 09:37 AM. Reason: error

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                              • #60
                                Re: 18v Ridgid cordless drills, battteries &amp; torque

                                Originally posted by doubtingtom View Post
                                (viz-a-viz .. your comment) My DeWalt 3/8" corded drill is what makes this choice harder for me. Your comment brings the new Bosch 10.8v L-I drill/driver into the picture. There is just no easy battery selection for Ridgid's neat Impact Driver as an alternative.

                                Tom B
                                While that tool is "cute" it is, IMHO, wayyyy overpriced. It might be the perfect tool for a cabinet maker who wants something lightweight to reach for and can justify the cost because it is part of this business. Also, remember it is a 1/4 quick disconnect chuck which can't really replace a small drill.

                                Another lightweight set to consider is the new Makita 18 volt lithium drill and driver set sold at HD for $270. The batteries are only 1.5Ah, but that is plenty for most small jobs and you get a very nice, lightweight impact driver. Once you've used an impact, you will ask yourself what you did all these years without one. The bad thing about the Makita is I haven't heard great reviews on the rest of the tools...ie there is some pretty unhappy reviews of the recriprocating saw, for example. On the other hand your lightweight drill might not need to be compatible with the rest of your tools.

                                I agonized over this decision, myself, till I ended up buying the Panasonic 14.4 volt drill and impact driver set. This was an expensive option and I might not have gone that way had the Ridgid 18 volt lithium or Makita drill/impact set been available.
                                Last edited by Disaster; 10-01-2007, 10:17 AM.

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