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18v Ridgid cordless drills, battteries & torque

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  • #61
    Re: 18v Ridgid cordless drills, battteries & torque

    Disaster,

    I know what you're saying about the lights on the 24V batteries - they do seem to increase too fast during charging, giving you that false impression of quickcharge. On the flip side of the coin, that may be due to the battery technology. How, for 95% of your usage, you have flat and strong battery amperage flowing out, and then your power just cuts out and done. I'm wondering if the part of lithium-ion technology that causes this to happen also leads to the sharp increase with the lights during charging. Sort of that the voltage is there, but the amperage just isn't charged back in yet. Hard to say.

    But regarding the runtime, I'm definitely liking what I'm seeing from my dad's 24V set (he is too!). In my opinion, I think it is a fade situation with the monitoring circuit, that they hopefully got resolved, and these batteries are now a 2.0 version, if you will.

    Not sure if you bring them in for service what they will do. They might determine that they are working correctly and might not do anything, unless there is a "TSB" or so-to-speak, for the monitoring computer thing inside the battery, to fix this issue.

    Comment


    • #62
      Re: 18v Ridgid cordless drills, battteries & torque

      Doubting Tom,
      1. Get the Ridgid 18 Volt Compact Lithium Ion drill/driver (steer clear of the 18 volt ni-cad version).
      2. Keep the 3-piece 24 Volt Lithium Ion cordless set (or if you can find the 4-piece version still in your neck-of-the-woods).
      3. Sell the 24 volt hammerdrill (unless you feel that you will be doing at least 20% of your work with masonry/cement/brick).
      4. Use the money from the hammerdrill sale, and go and buy yourself a MaxSelect Impact driver.
      5. Add MaxSelect tools as needed. (circular saw, jigsaw)
      You will thank us later.

      The benefits of having 2 voltages of batteries to use with your tools are huge - definitely a huge help with cutting tools, such as the recip, and the circular saw. Also, having 4 batteries is always better than having 2 (even if there is a mild slow-drain issue still, these batteries charge in about 1/2 an hour - with 4 batteries, tons of time to drain what you got, while charging one of them). And lastly, quit agonizing over if you should go with the 2.5 Ah Max battery set. The pros/cons of lithium-ion now hugely outweigh those of Ni-Cad. If you were to use the two different versions of the 18volt drills side-by-side for a day long project, you would easily chose the lithium one. Both the 18 volt lithium-ion and the 24 volt lithium-ion batteries are better rated than the 18 volt ni-cads (2.9ah, 3.0ah, and 2.5ah, respectively). And for the price difference that you are quoting, it is an easy choice. Many make this choice, even without the sales, and with their choice being the lithium-ion version, even with a normally double-the-cost price.

      You will thank us later.

      Comment


      • #63
        Re: 18v Ridgid cordless drills, battteries & torque

        Originally posted by canucksartech View Post
        Disaster,

        Not sure if you bring them in for service what they will do. They might determine that they are working correctly and might not do anything, unless there is a "TSB" or so-to-speak, for the monitoring computer thing inside the battery, to fix this issue.
        Yeah, that is my concern. I'm not sure if they would consider the fast drain a "defect" even if they did improve it.

        I just checked my batteries and one was at 3 bars and the other at 4. If I recall, they were charged 3 or 4 weeks ago.

        Comment


        • #64
          Re: 18v Ridgid cordless drills, battteries & torque

          Originally posted by canucksartech View Post
          [*]Sell the 24 volt hammerdrill (unless you feel that you will be doing at least 20% of your work with masonry/cement/brick).
          I'm actually doing this with my MaxHC batteries which are unused. If the 18 volt lithium batteries pan out I'll sell the Max2.5's as well.

          There is a thriving business on Ebay for buying and selling individual pieces from tool sets. As long as manufacturers bundle tools at great prices, or worse, don't offer some tools except in sets, there will continue to be a thriving business on Ebay.

          Comment


          • #65
            Re: 18v Ridgid cordless drills, battteries & torque

            ..... was told this morning (telephone) that the early 24v batts did indeed have some notable issues and that they have been greatly improved with current versions. This is not filled with details/facts, but tends to relieve some of my concerns which were pointed out earlier here.

            Tom B

            Comment


            • #66
              Re: 18v Ridgid cordless drills, battteries & torque

              OK ... 'Beam me up Scotty' .... I've slipped down again.

              Very consistent with the earlier comment about hammer and non-hammer 'quality' drills ..... a Milwaukee Tool person noted today that there is only a few ounces difference between these two tools (hammer or non-). The typical bare tool weight is over 4 lbs. The inference (to me) is that the newer 'compact' drills, weighing notably less, are simply not built as 'heavy-duty' as the traditional 'pro' versions.

              If this is a well-accepted conclusion, then I can ignore the 'hammer' function and decide solely on the issues of tool weight and battery weight. I agree that driving curtain rod screws with a 7lb drill seems absurd but I need to balance that with the number of situations in which a lighter version will come up short in terms of torque or numbers of tough tasks. With Ridgid tools, it now boils down to the 'paired' scenario <hammer & 24v L-I> vs <compact & 18v L-I>. Perhaps I missed this message in earlier posts, but it seems clear now. It becomes a blk&wht 2lb decision (tool +batt) unless I can step up and acquire both 18v & 24v kits. For my home job needs this is unlikely. Staying with MaxSelect offerings seems smart given the current family of tools. Things can improve (by ~1 lb) if 18v L-I batts become cheaper, available separately, and chargeable on the 24v charger. Is that asking too much?

              Tom B

              Comment


              • #67
                Re: 18v Ridgid cordless drills, battteries &amp; torque

                Originally posted by doubtingtom View Post
                Very consistent with the earlier comment about hammer and non-hammer 'quality' drills ..... a Milwaukee Tool person noted today that there is only a few ounces difference between these two tools (hammer or non-). The typical bare tool weight is over 4 lbs. The inference (to me) is that the newer 'compact' drills, weighing notably less, are simply not built as 'heavy-duty' as the traditional 'pro' versions.
                I think that is reasonable except I'd add that hammerdrills are generally only put on the heavier duty models...the ones that weigh quite a bit to begin with.

                I like your 4lb number. In my experience 4 to 4 and 1/2 pounds is about as light as you can go before you start sacrificing durability for weight. There are a lot of nice drills in this category. The Ridgid 18v and 24v hammerdrill are however, very heavy compared to their equally durable competitors. They give up a pound to a pound and a half. The Ridgid 18 volt lithium is much closer and I doubt it is much less durable than the competitors.

                A really nice and inexpensive lightweight Lithium drill is the Black and Decker SC1400. I paid about $70 bucks for it with a 10% off coupon at HD. It weighs 2 and a half pounds. This is the drill I use for the light jobs (like curtain rods) when I don't want to take the larger drills out. The weight makes it a joy to use, yet it still has the torque of an many 18 volt drills.

                You may find that you end up using this cheap drill for 90% of the jobs around the house.

                Last edited by Disaster; 10-01-2007, 05:10 PM.

                Comment


                • #68
                  Re: 18v Ridgid cordless drills, battteries &amp; torque

                  Originally posted by Disaster View Post
                  I think that is reasonable except I'd add that hammerdrills are generally only put on the heavier duty models...the ones that weigh quite a bit to begin with.
                  I like your 4lb number. In my experience 4 to 4 and 1/2 pounds is about as light as you can go before you start sacrificing durability for weight. <edit> ......... The Ridgid 18 volt lithium is much closer and I doubt it is much less durable than the competitors.

                  A really nice and inexpensive lightweight Lithium drill is the Black and Decker SC1400. <edit> ...... The weight makes it a joy to use, yet it still has the torque of an many 18 volt drills.

                  You may find that you end up using this cheap drill for 90% of the jobs around the house.

                  Methinks you are quite correct! If I go with the Ridgid 18v L-I, then it becomes my 'go to' tool. If I grab the dang nice 24v kit deal, then this B-D looks like a terrific companion.

                  Regards,
                  Tom B

                  Comment


                  • #69
                    Re: Oh No !! New October Ridgid Offer ....

                    I had finally fine tuned my purchase decision and chose to go with the 18v L-I Drill. It's not MaxSelect, but the other tools will work fine with the 18v batts.

                    NEW INFO ! Ridgid Tech Support just (10/1) advised to my e-Box that 18v L-I batts are 1.5 AHr! Not earthshaking, but definitely another point to consider viz-a-viz the 24v kit.

                    Then I saw the new Ridgid offer ...... if I buy the R931 (24v L-U kit) I was also leaning toward, I get a 14.4v Impact Driver & batts freeI I guess this defines pro______ion .... it's all about the $$$. I not only save an addiitional $9. worth of 10% new acct discount, $30. on the recip saw, AND NOW ..... $149. on the Impact Driver ..... almost $200.!!!

                    I know my mind will turn that extra '2lbs' of Hammer Drill & 24v batt into something like '10lbs' every time I pick it up to do something mundane ..... all to have gotten some more $$ worth of stuff. Disgusting ...

                    Tom B
                    Last edited by doubtingtom; 10-02-2007, 02:49 PM. Reason: New info

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                    • #70
                      Re: Oh No !! New October Ridgid Offer ....

                      Originally posted by doubtingtom View Post
                      NEW INFO ! Ridgid Tech Support just (10/1) advised to my e-Box that 18v L-I batts are 1.5 AHr! Not earthshaking, but definitely another point to consider viz-a-viz the 24v kit.
                      Actually, that is HUGE and totally counter to the information Ridgid gave out before.

                      See posting by "RidgidUser":

                      http://www.ridgidforum.com/forum/sho...t=11896&page=5

                      "I wanted to find out what the Ah rating was, and it didn't say anywhere on the box, or even on the battery anywhere, let alone in the manual. So the guys at the contractor's desk started calling Ridgid Tech Support, and they found out that it is indeed 2.9 Ah. Then I saw a listing on eBay this morning - same thing, 2.9 Ah. So I just called Ridgid three separate times (just to make sure), and each time I was informed of the same number - 2.9 Ah."

                      That will be a major disappointment. Ryobi's new batteries are better than that...and considerably cheaper!!!!

                      Comment


                      • #71
                        Re: 18v Ridgid cordless drills, battteries &amp; torque

                        I just checked the Ryobi site and their 18 volt Lithium Ion battery is 2.4AH. I believe Ridgid's Lithium Ion is 2.9AH as you stated, so Ridgid has Ryobi beat. Don't know why they all keep this such a guarded secret? I've used Ryobi cordless around the house for years and they were okay, always had trouble with the batteries. I'm sure the new batteries will be a major improvement, but last year I purchased the Ridgid 18volt kit and the strength and quality of the Ridgid over Ryobi is very obvious. Ridgid all the way for my money.

                        Comment


                        • #72
                          Re: Ridgid L-I Batteries

                          I called Ridgid tech support to follow-up on the e-Box message. That person also confirmed the 1.5AHr number. If you look at Makita's 3 AHr batts and their lower cost (B&W) L-I batts, it seems pretty clear that Ridgid's 18v L-I are comparable to the smaller Makita product (1.6 AHr). The reason I probed this more thoroughly was that the 'physics' did not seem to bear out the notable strength for such a small physical size and weight. The Tech Support person today noted an original plan to go to 3 AHr but that the final decision was to provide lower weight. Makita stated today that they are also responding to market demand for lighter weight and that should result in more 14.4v offerings.

                          None-the-less, I opted for the 24v kit since the Ridgid offer of a free 14.v Impact Driver was just to good to ignore. The kit is now ready to use and I will be mailing the offer paperwork in tomorrow. ... Man! ... that Hammer drill is definitely stoutwith the 24v 'supercell' attached.

                          Perhaps the final chapter on this (18v L-I battery specs) is not yet written, but I will be most surprised if the 1.5 AHr rating does not hold up.

                          Tom B

                          Comment


                          • #73
                            Re: 18v Ridgid cordless drills, battteries &amp; torque

                            We are getting some wrong information somewhere. The Ridgid 18 volt Lithium Ion battery is 2.9 AH not 1.4. Got that number from several people on this site and the Ridgid Tech line. Please call again, I 'm pretty sure my number is correct.

                            Comment


                            • #74
                              Re: Ridgid L-I Batteries

                              Originally posted by doubtingtom View Post
                              I called Ridgid tech support to follow-up on the e-Box message. That person also confirmed the 1.5AHr number. If you look at Makita's 3 AHr batts and their lower cost (B&W) L-I batts, it seems pretty clear that Ridgid's 18v L-I are comparable to the smaller Makita product (1.6 AHr). The reason I probed this more thoroughly was that the 'physics' did not seem to bear out the notable strength for such a small physical size and weight. The Tech Support person today noted an original plan to go to 3 AHr but that the final decision was to provide lower weight.
                              I looked at the batteries again...specifically the weight, and sadly, I'm inclined to agree with you. Nice investigative work, by the way.

                              This is unfortunate because some people, like myself, made the purchase decision based on the information provided by Ridgid that the batteries were 2.9Ah and therefore a nice upgrade to our Max2.5Ah ones. The batteries only being half that makes the kit much less of a value. I wouldn't have bought it.

                              Knowing that the Ridgid battery is no better than the Makita, I'd be inclined instead to either buy the Makita drill which is only $20 more and lighter. Also, Makita is a little better known and commands better resale. Better still, the new kit, Makita is offering, with an impact driver for $270 which is a better value than the Ridgid drill. Then there is the Hitachi 18 volt drill with 1.5Ah batteries that Lowes sells for the same price. Like Makita, Hitachi has a good reputation and in my experience, better resale value than Ridgid.

                              I hope Ridgid will eventually come out with 18 volt Lithium batteries that aren't of the compact variety. They could still be 3Ah and be considerably lighter than the bricklike Max2.5's. Plus, they would have all the other advantages of Lithium Ion. Those are the ones I want.

                              Now I've got to see if I can find my receipt so I can return the $179 kit.
                              Last edited by Disaster; 10-03-2007, 05:05 AM.

                              Comment


                              • #75
                                Re: 18v Ridgid cordless drills, battteries &amp; torque

                                I just did some comparisons of Ridgid's 18 volt "compact" drill vs. some competitors.

                                First lets look at weight.

                                Ridgid 18 volt compact = 4 lbs. 5 ounces.
                                Panasonic 14.4 volt = 3 lbs. 10 ounces.
                                Makita 18 volt compact = 3lbs. 9 ounces.
                                Hitachi 18 volt compact = 3 lbs 11 ounces.

                                Battery total power = Voltage x Ah

                                Ridgid, Makita and Hitachi = 27
                                Panasonic = 43

                                Max. Torque in.lb

                                Ridgid = 455
                                Makita = 450 (there have been reviews that say this number is optimistic)
                                Panasonic = 390
                                Hitachi = 374

                                Size - Length from chuck tip to back of motor

                                Panasonic = 8"
                                Ridgid = 9 3/4"
                                Makita = 8"
                                Hitachi = 9"** **Very approximate...need to recheck.

                                Features

                                Ridgid: worklight and bit holder
                                Makita: worklight
                                Panasonic: worklight and belt hook
                                Hitachi: belt hook and bit holder

                                Price, alone and in kit with impact
                                Ridgid: $180
                                Makita: $200, $270
                                Hitachi: $180
                                Panasonic: $270, $360

                                I bought the Panasonic kit. At the time, for me, it was the best compromise of weight, size, runtime and durability. I probably would have bought the Makita kit, if it had been available at the time.

                                Bottom line: The Ridgid compact drill is not that compact. Nor is it an great value compared to the competitive offerings...especially compared to the Makita kit that includes an impact driver.
                                Last edited by Disaster; 10-03-2007, 08:30 AM.

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