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18v Ridgid cordless drills, battteries & torque

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  • #91
    Re: 18v Ridgid cordless drills, battteries & torque

    Got mine the week they came out, must be almost a year maybe. I use it mainly for woodworking and driving smaller stuff where the impact driver is a little too much. For everything else I use a Dewalt 36v. I'm very happy with how its worked. I actually can't imagine using another drill for those tasks anymore. Its so light and handy it's a real pleasure to use.

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    • #92
      Re: 18v Ridgid cordless drills, battteries & torque

      Originally posted by Velosapien View Post
      Got mine the week they came out, must be almost a year maybe. I use it mainly for woodworking and driving smaller stuff where the impact driver is a little too much. For everything else I use a Dewalt 36v. I'm very happy with how its worked. I actually can't imagine using another drill for those tasks anymore. Its so light and handy it's a real pleasure to use.
      Yes....When I hefted the Makita compact at Home Depot it felt perfect in my hand. By that time I had the Ridgid 24V set and a couple Maxselect tools so I could only hope that the then pending Ridgid 18V LI compact was close. It certainly does not quite get there in comparison to the Makita compact, however as you noticed I think its a pretty good drill.
      Not to steal a thread but do you have the DeWalt 36V circ and recip saws and how do you like them?

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      • #93
        Re: 18v Ridgid cordless drills, battteries & torque

        I don't have the 36v saw yet but others here have it and they seem to be very impressed by its performance. Reviews also point to it being the most powerful cordless circular saw out there. I got the Drill and recip saw combo which was selling for $479 at HD and soon after dropped to $399. Not bad considering the Ridgid 24v kit sells for only $20 less and only includes the extra flashlight. I also bought the 36v jigsaw as a bare tool. I'm very impressed with them to say the least. They kept the same size footprint as the 18v tools with loads more power. The recip saw and jigsaw easily match the performance of their corded counterparts. The drill is pretty hefty. It's just under 7 lbs but they kept to their typical design so it's well balanced which makes the weight very managable. Their T handle drill designs have been considered very good in that regard. The only thing I really wish they had changed in the drill is the 3rd high gear which is pretty much exclusively for the hammerdrill mode. They dropped to a pretty low 1600rpm when they have traditionally used 2000rpm on the 18v models. I wish they had gone with something like an ultra fast 2500rpm to increase the blow per minute rate like the corded models. I have a feeling that would not reflect well in the torque ratings which are ever so important for marketing even though the hammerdrill mode requires very little torque and is better suited with an extremely fast speed. Either that or they want to avoid people who don't know how to properly select speeds smoking the drill trying to drive a 3" hole saw in high gear. I use it almost exclusively in hammer mode so thats my only real gripe with it.

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        • #94
          Re: 18v Ridgid cordless drills, battteries & torque

          That's a good point about the hammerdrill having a relatively slow high RPM. It's totally fine for wood drilling, 1600RPM is more than enough for spade and twist bits and so on. But a good corded hammerdrill almost always goes way over 2000RPM and hits at 35,000BPM plus. Some are even way higher than that. I too am surprised in their quest for corded performance that they did not do that. But you can't have everything. My feeling is that they truly aimed that drill for big wood bits. In their promo material notice in fact they barely emphasize the hammerdrilling performance. In fact I think it's non-existent in the comparisons.

          That said, it's geared at 400RPM in low range which makes it perfect for big bits like augers and self feeds which it handles without a problem. The drill power is more subtle that the other tools because most typical drilling tasks don't take a high amount of power. But you'll notice that in drilling big that it barely slows down or strains the way an 18V does. Plus it has the endurance to do things like 20 self feed holes at 2 9/16" one after the other without tiring or slowing down. The heat generated by the motor is far less than an 18V and the battery really never gets hot. Not long ago I mixed some concrete with it in a bucket. This is the kind of job you'd throw at a big 1/2" D handle normally.

          In my opinion, the 36V circular is the "star" of the 4-tool kit. It's probably the most dramatic improvement in that it readily shows its stuff and it's very obvious from the first cut you make. Just the fact that they upped the blade to 7 1/4" and put such a high power behind it is a major achievement. There are few cordless saws out there that have a 7 1/4" blade and even fewer that have the power to turn it like a corded unit.

          On the down side though, the blade guard sucks big time (gets hung up very easily and frequently stops the saw from moving) and the tool-less blade change is a nice idea on paper, but please provide a hex wrench next time.

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          • #95
            Re: 18v Ridgid cordless drills, battteries & torque

            Originally posted by Sceeter W Wheels View Post
            That's a good point about the hammerdrill having a relatively slow high RPM. It's totally fine for wood drilling, 1600RPM is more than enough for spade and twist bits and so on. But a good corded hammerdrill almost always goes way over 2000RPM and hits at 35,000BPM plus. Some are even way higher than that. I too am surprised in their quest for corded performance that they did not do that. But you can't have everything. My feeling is that they truly aimed that drill for big wood bits. In their promo material notice in fact they barely emphasize the hammerdrilling performance. In fact I think it's non-existent in the comparisons.
            I also have the DW520 which is their top end corded hammerdrill. It does 2700rpm and something like 50,000 bpm. Let me tell you that thing can really rip through concrete. The 36v drill easily delivers as much power. They are both rated at 750w. One thing I noticed is the hammer ring ratchet on the 36v is more pronounced than on the 18v models. It definately slams harder than the 18v drills so it still drills faster even though it turns slower. The bummer is the 36v easily has the cojones to power through at a much higher speed. For my needs I wouldn't even mind for them to completely drop the high torque modes and even the driving clutch. Just make a pure 36v hammerdrill model with only high speed gears. All construction here is concrete all around so hammerdrills are the only way to go. There still is need for large wood boaring bits every now and then its fairly rare. Most of the time the high torque modes are as useful as an air conditioner is to an eskimo. I really want to try the 36v roto hammer since that is by far the tool I most frequently use. I'm getting about 4 months out of the brushes on my corded one. The cordless would be sweet but at $799 for the kit and almost $600 for the bare tool, if I can find it, I'm not sure it's a practical investment.

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            • #96
              Re: 18v Ridgid cordless drills, battteries & torque

              Originally posted by roadrashray View Post
              Now with regard to the weight comparison of the Ridgid 18V LI Compact drill with 18 volt drills from other manufacturers I believe over all the Ridgid drill compares very favorably. I went to a few sites and obtained the following. I tried to find the lightest 18V drill for each mfgr. Some are not LI because they aren't available yet.
              Panasonic 18V 5.7lbs
              Dewalt 18V 5.2lbs
              Bosch 18V 5.7lbs
              Milwaukee 18V 6.1lbs
              Porter Cable 19.2V 5.25lbs
              Hitachi 18V 4.6lbs
              Ridgid 18V 4.29lbs
              Makita 18V 3.5lbs
              ...Any way at 4.29lbs (with battery on our local USPS electronic scale)I would hardly describe the Ridgid 18V LI compact drill as "porky". A quick review of the above list demonstrates the weight of the 18V Ridgid is at the low end of 18V drill weights.
              Your list demonstrates how most standard (not compact) drills from competitors are lighter than Ridgid's 7 and 1/2 pound 18 volt drill.

              There aren't a lot of compact, lightweight 18 volt drills out there now to compare, but two are the Makita and Hitachi which weigh 3.5lbs and 3.7lbs respectively, with 1.5Ah batteries.

              If you look at the size, the Ridgid "compact" drill isn't very small either.

              I do agree it is much nicer to lug around than their "regular" 18 volt drill and a nice addition for someone who wants to stick to orange.

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              • #97
                Re: 18v Ridgid cordless drills, batteries & torque

                When talking about hammer drills, what size holes are you wanting to drill in concrete? The larger diameter bits require slower rotation speeds and harder hits than smaller diameter. Also long length bits need harder impacts than short length bits. Maybe Dewalt had in mind that users of their 36 Volt hammer drill wanted to drill mostly 3/8 and larger holes.

                Here's specs on a Bosch 36 Volt hammer drill. Please note they kept speeds down on this model.
                http://www.boschtools.com/tools/tool...14&I=73371&T=1


                For what it's worth, try looking at specs for corded roto hammers and especially those rated for 1-1/2" and larger. Slow rotation and slower but much harder strikes. If you could find a 1/4" bit for one of them it would be hard to keep it from getting busted real fast.
                Last edited by Woussko; 10-04-2007, 01:12 AM.

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                • #98
                  Re: 18v Ridgid cordless drills, battteries & torque

                  Josh / ProBrand ???

                  Like others here have said, there's a huge letdown here if we are NOW being told that the 18 volt lithium-ion batteries are only 1.5 Ah. There's quite a few of us who got one right at the end of June, after they were released for Father's Day. And, most of us based our purchasing decision on the Ah rating. And, at that time, I myself was told by multiple sources (Ridgid customer service x 3 calls, Ridgid tech support x 2 calls, in-store Ridgid rep x 1, store associates x quite-a-few-but-we-know-they-are-usually-wrong) that these batteries were 2.9 Ah. And I, like others, presumed this to be correct due to the reference to 18 volt 3.0 Ah lithium-ion batteries on the boxes of various MaxSelect tools (even if the picture looked different - we could understand a design styling change). Also, based on my usage, I felt like this 2.9 Ah number was correct - I noticed a bit of a better performance when compared to my previous standard 18 volt drill, with the standard 1.4 Ah ni-cads (or whatever they were), plus I've done some side-by-side testing with a 2.5 MaxAh NiCad, and felt the lithium-ion did better, therefore warranting the 2.9 Ah rating I was being told of. But, if these are in fact only 1.5 Ah, and I therefore missing out more on the power of 2.9 Ah, I would feel very jaded and disappointed to know that I'm not getting the power/performance I should have been.

                  But now we are being told they might only be 1.5 Ah. Over 3 months since they were released. This is a huuuuuggee letdown. We're talking about multiple internal sources from Ridgid passing on incorrect information previously, if it is true that these are in fact only 1.5 Ah - whether it is being passed along fraudulently or unintentionally is a whole different matter altogether!

                  I for one (and I'm guessing others as well, based on posts on this forum) would like some real answers. We've talked about this for months now. And for months Ridgid has not given us a real answer to this on paper, or bothered to at least update and reflect this info on the product listing on the Ridgid webpage. Basically...WTF Ridgid?!!?!!

                  It's been 3 months since these were released - can we get a real answer on this???????
                  Last edited by canucksartech; 10-04-2007, 09:12 AM.

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                  • #99
                    Re: 18v Ridgid cordless drills, batteries & torque

                    Originally posted by Woussko View Post
                    When talking about hammer drills, what size holes are you wanting to drill in concrete? The larger diameter bits require slower rotation speeds and harder hits than smaller diameter. Also long length bits need harder impacts than short length bits. Maybe Dewalt had in mind that users of their 36 Volt hammer drill wanted to drill mostly 3/8 and larger holes.
                    Hammerdrill speed actually doesn't have as much to do with optimal bit speed as it does with the tool thats doing the drilling. In the case of a hammerdrill the impact energy is created by a counter rotating ratchet ring which all it really does is pulse the bit. The impact energy is very small so it needs to turn as fast as possible to increse the blow rate. Thats why you'll see the corded models having incredibly high rpm rates. That has always been the logic behind Dewalt drills having a 3rd high gear. Most good drills are rated up to 1/2" bits but that's highly optimistic. Even the best are practical for holes of mostly up to about 5/16" unless its softer material. The rotary hammer will create the impact energy from a pneumatic piston that can deliver a massive amount of blast energy independantly of the rotation. Bit rotation speed becomes less important because the rotation action is mainly for extracting the dust and debris through the bit flutes. For example if you're drilling a 1/4" hole with a hammer drill it will be a lot more efficient if it spins the bit faster to increase the bpm while the same bit on a roto hammer can do the same job at very slow rpm. For the most part if you want to make holes into concrete regardless of the size, a roto hammer will always be a lot easier. Problem is they are large and heavy. The impact energy is so hard that when using them for small holes for things like tapcon pilot holes they can tend to wallow them out or slightly oversizing them reducing the grip strength. Hammerdrills leave a cleaner and more precise size hole.
                    Last edited by Velosapien; 10-04-2007, 09:21 AM.

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                    • Re: 18v Ridgid cordless drills, battteries & torque

                      Seeing all the upset comments here over the past few days makes me think that perhaps a simple solution (from Ridgid) could solve the issue for the most part. I really don't feel that the tool itself is badly deficient so perhaps a one-time offering of additional 1.5 AHr L-I batts should be made to existing owners. 1.5 x 2 = 3.0 and I can't believe the slight inconvenience of changing batts would really be a major issue for most users. This solution could be implemented very quickly and easily and would seem to provide the result most owners originally intended. I do not have strong links to Ridgid, but there must be some on this Forum who could intervene and ask about making this solution available.

                      Would this work to the extent that it would satisfy a number of very unhappy exisiting Ridgid 18v L-I drill users ??

                      Tom B
                      .

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                      • Re: 18v Ridgid cordless drills, battteries & torque

                        Starting a new thread on this battery issue (18 Volt Lithium-Ion batteries - Ah rating situation).....

                        We'll see about getting some answers hopefully.....

                        Comment


                        • Re: 18v Ridgid cordless drills, battteries & torque

                          Intresting, do you mean the 36V drill, depite the lower BPM/RPM can challenge the DW520 on hammerdrilling speed? I've done some 1/2" holes in concrete block and it seemed very effective, but for the amount of hammerdrilling I do, I'm probably not the best person to make the comparison.

                          There are number of corded replacement possibilities for the 36V line. Now that they have that level of juice, it should open up areas for things like cordless portable miter saws, dedicated hammerdrills like you're saying, right angle drills. You could even make a decent chainsaw as well. I'm not sure where DeWalt is going with it, the line is already pretty versatile, but I guess like any tool company, they cater most to what they think will sell.

                          Originally posted by Velosapien View Post
                          I also have the DW520 which is their top end corded hammerdrill. It does 2700rpm and something like 50,000 bpm. Let me tell you that thing can really rip through concrete. The 36v drill easily delivers as much power. They are both rated at 750w. One thing I noticed is the hammer ring ratchet on the 36v is more pronounced than on the 18v models. It definately slams harder than the 18v drills so it still drills faster even though it turns slower. The bummer is the 36v easily has the cojones to power through at a much higher speed. For my needs I wouldn't even mind for them to completely drop the high torque modes and even the driving clutch. Just make a pure 36v hammerdrill model with only high speed gears. All construction here is concrete all around so hammerdrills are the only way to go. There still is need for large wood boaring bits every now and then its fairly rare. Most of the time the high torque modes are as useful as an air conditioner is to an eskimo. I really want to try the 36v roto hammer since that is by far the tool I most frequently use. I'm getting about 4 months out of the brushes on my corded one. The cordless would be sweet but at $799 for the kit and almost $600 for the bare tool, if I can find it, I'm not sure it's a practical investment.

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                          • Re: 18v Ridgid cordless drills, battteries & torque

                            From what I have seen it would seem that Dewalt is getting rid of the 36V altogether. They always seem to be on clearance and I see no new tools coming out with it.

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                            • Re: 18v Ridgid cordless drills, battteries & torque

                              Not that I know of. I've seen a couple of stores selling off some of it, but it's still in the Home Depots around here. I have not seen V28 in a long time, which is too bad. They had it for a while, but it seemed to disappear. Don't know why because V28 is a nice tool set.

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                              • Re: 18v Ridgid cordless drills, battteries & torque

                                Originally posted by Sceeter W Wheels View Post
                                Intresting, do you mean the 36V drill, depite the lower BPM/RPM can challenge the DW520 on hammerdrilling speed? I've done some 1/2" holes in concrete block and it seemed very effective, but for the amount of hammerdrilling I do, I'm probably not the best person to make the comparison.
                                It does pretty good but doesn't quite match the DW520. It can outdo the DC925 which runs at 2000rpm but the DC925 can still give it a run for its money in some cases. If the 36v drill could do at least 2500rpm with at 40,000bpm+ then I have no doubt it would at least match the 520. When it comes to drilling in block its usually no big deal. Block is relatively soft and even smaller drills do quite well there. It's the poured stuff, particularly very old well cured concrete that can sometimes even make a roto hammer beg for mercy with bits as small as a 3/16"! I think I'm going to contact Dewalt and suggest they make a dedicated 36v hammerdrill like the DW520.

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