Announcement

Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.

220V compatible charger?

Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    Re: 220V compatible charger?

    I hope you get some answers from Ridgid tech support on this. The charger must be matched to your battery pack(s). The more we get into this the better the idea of a 12V DC to 120 V AC power inverter seems for now. Actually what you may want to look into and not just for this, but for using all of your 120 Volt devices would be a 200-240 Volt 50 Hertz input to 120 Volts 60 Hertz converter. It could be done using a high output DC power supply and an inverter. This would not come cheap and it would be a sizable and heavy device.

    Comment


    • #17
      Re: 220V compatible charger?

      Well, Ridgid Tech Support was not able to provide too many details about the RapidMax charger except the fact that they "detect temperatures in the battery, and charge based on that."

      This could mean a couple of things. For example, if the charger senses the battery is too hot, it will not start charging till it cools down. For sure, we know this happens. Another possibility is that it also stops charging based on temperature because after a battery has a full charge, if you keep feeding it juice, it will start to heat up. We don't know this happens, and Tech Support is not able to provide any more details. My best guess guess is that the temperature reading is only used for the first case. After that, it just uses a timer-based charge. Can anybody confirm this, or do you know any more details about how the RapidMax chargers start/moderate/terminate charging?

      At this point, it sounds like the best option is to simply go the DC-AC inverter route. Most inverters output a square-modified sine wave since that's easy to produce. However, according to one of the FAQs at http://wagan.com/htmls/faq.html, some cordless tool battery chargers have problems with this. So to be totally safe, I'll go for one of the more expensive true/pure sine wave inverters. Wagan offers two (http://wagan.com/htmls/powerinv-puresine.html), but there are probably many other companies that offer something similar.

      Comment

      Working...
      X