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  • R8823 Impact Driver

    I purchased the above noted impact driver which does not come with any batteries. So, the sales associate pointed me towards the R86006 18V lithium-ion drill. Upon getting these units home, I noticed the impact drivers manual states to use either 18 V Ni-Cad batteries or 24 V lithium-ion. Can I not use the 18 V lithion-ion batteries in the impact driver?

    It fits but what are the issues in using it?
    Last edited by cstp; 11-26-2007, 03:16 PM.

  • #2
    Re: R8823 Impact Driver voltage question

    I have been using the R8823 and the Compact 18V LI drill and working both of them hard for several months with the 18V LI batteries. The last I knew all MaxSelect tools can be used with the 24V LI, 18V LI, or 18V NiCad batteries. On the outside of my R8823 box it lists all three batteries. I use the 18V LI batteries in the Impact tool, jig saw, and planer.
    PS...You also have a great drill now. The Compact 18V LI drill has great balance, power, trigger control and run time for such small batteries. Other advantages of the LI batteries is they have internal control so they don't lose power gradually like the NiCads but hold full power until the end when they will just stop and they can be charged at any time without developing a false floor.
    Enjoy those tools.....Ray
    Last edited by roadrashray; 11-26-2007, 04:24 PM.

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    • #3
      Re: R8823 Impact Driver voltage question

      Originally posted by roadrashray View Post
      I have been using the R8823 and the Compact 18V LI drill and working both of them hard for several months with the 18V LI batteries. The last I knew all MaxSelect tools can be used with the 24V LI, 18V LI, or 18V NiCad batteries. On the outside of my R8823 box it lists all three batteries. I use the 18V LI batteries in the Impact tool, jig saw, and planer.
      PS...You also have a great drill now. The Compact 18V LI drill has great balance, power, trigger control and run time for such small batteries. Other advantages of the LI batteries is they have internal control so they don't lose power gradually like the NiCads but hold full power until the end when they will just stop and they can be charged at any time without developing a false floor.
      Enjoy those tools.....Ray
      Ray:

      Thanks.....I gimpact driver was a display model from Home Depot ($63 CDN) and they no longer had the box or the manual so I downloaded the manual from the site. Perhaps the manual is not up to date. (Reference pg 18, first sentence after "BATTERIES"). Love the drill.......makes my Dewalt seem very old and cheap although it has served me well.

      Thanks for your response. I will try out the impact driver tonight now that I know it will work with it.

      What model planer and jig saw do you have? How do you like them?

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: R8823 Impact Driver voltage question

        Originally posted by cstp View Post
        Ray:

        Thanks.....I gimpact driver was a display model from Home Depot ($63 CDN) and they no longer had the box or the manual so I downloaded the manual from the site. Perhaps the manual is not up to date. (Reference pg 18, first sentence after "BATTERIES"). Love the drill.......makes my Dewalt seem very old and cheap although it has served me well.

        Thanks for your response. I will try out the impact driver tonight now that I know it will work with it.

        What model planer and jig saw do you have? How do you like them?
        MaxSelect on both. Go to Ridgid power tool catalogue on this site for a listing of all MaxSelect tools. They are built to be used with 18 or 24 volt batteries. The jig saw is a great jobsite tool. It has good power with the 18 or 24 volt batteries. The chuck requires a short learning curve to get the blade insertion right and it would be nice with a trigger lock for scrolling work. What is sweet is to have a powerfull jig saw right out of the bag without messing with extension cords.
        The planer is a little less usable or I haven't figured it out yet. I have a tough time making a smooth plane on a board edge. Maybe some other blades would help but I haven't done anything yet. I wouldn't recommend it unless they have improved it since I got mine in 2/07.
        You will love the impact tool for driving screws. It is powerfull, fast and easy on the elbow. You will find you can remove old rusted, stuck, deformed screws which yu would have never driven out with a screw gun.
        Enjoy....Ray

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: R8823 Impact Driver

          I don't understand what you mean by using the R8823 to drive screws? Isn't it an impact wrench, for sockets? If not, how the heck do you use it? Can it be a drill?

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: R8823 Impact Driver voltage question

            Originally posted by roadrashray View Post
            MaxSelect on both. Go to Ridgid power tool catalogue on this site for a listing of all MaxSelect tools. They are built to be used with 18 or 24 volt batteries. The jig saw is a great jobsite tool. It has good power with the 18 or 24 volt batteries. The chuck requires a short learning curve to get the blade insertion right and it would be nice with a trigger lock for scrolling work. What is sweet is to have a powerfull jig saw right out of the bag without messing with extension cords.
            The planer is a little less usable or I haven't figured it out yet. I have a tough time making a smooth plane on a board edge. Maybe some other blades would help but I haven't done anything yet. I wouldn't recommend it unless they have improved it since I got mine in 2/07.
            You will love the impact tool for driving screws. It is powerfull, fast and easy on the elbow. You will find you can remove old rusted, stuck, deformed screws which yu would have never driven out with a screw gun.
            Enjoy....Ray

            Ray:

            Just tried the impact driver. The reason I purchased it is because I am installing a subfloor in our laundry room in the basement and I am using tapcon anchors into the concrete floor to hold the insulation and plywood down. I normally hate using tapcons, but so far I am loving this tool for doing this. I've tried 10 or so tapcons so far and it works like a charm.

            I wouldn't mind getting a cordless skil saw or jig saw. My skil saw is a DeWalt and it's batteries are starting to die (shared with my DeWalt drill). My jig saw is a Bosch, which I can't say enough good things about, but it is corded and I think a cordless one would be quite convenient.

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            • #7
              Re: R8823 Impact Driver

              Originally posted by Quantum View Post
              I don't understand what you mean by using the R8823 to drive screws? Isn't it an impact wrench, for sockets? If not, how the heck do you use it? Can it be a drill?
              Quantum......The 8823 is a 1/4" hex drive "impact tool" that is awesome for driving screws. As you have correctly noted an impact drive has a 1/2" connection for driving sockets.
              The advantage of the impact tool for driving screws is they are very light and small and drive screws very fast and easy. You can drive screws much faster and easier than any screw gun. They are much easier on the old elbow as they put no stress on it. Do a search on this site for favorable comments or go to Amazon and read some of the user reviews of Makita or DeWalt impact tools......Ray

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: R8823 Impact Driver voltage question

                Originally posted by cstp View Post
                Ray:

                Just tried the impact driver. The reason I purchased it is because I am installing a subfloor in our laundry room in the basement and I am using tapcon anchors into the concrete floor to hold the insulation and plywood down. I normally hate using tapcons, but so far I am loving this tool for doing this. I've tried 10 or so tapcons so far and it works like a charm.

                I wouldn't mind getting a cordless skil saw or jig saw. My skil saw is a DeWalt and it's batteries are starting to die (shared with my DeWalt drill). My jig saw is a Bosch, which I can't say enough good things about, but it is corded and I think a cordless one would be quite convenient.
                Yep, we have a Bosch corded jig, great tool.
                You can buy new batteries that will rejuvinate the old DeWalt if the saw was acceptable in the past until the batts started slipping away or you can check out the Ridgid MaxSelect circ saw which will work with your Ridgid 18V LI batteries $119 at HD or $65-70 on ebay and although new you won't get the Lifetime service agreementon Ebay. I forgot to mention you can get MaxSelect circ and recip saws......after all x-mas is coming right up and th ewife might be looking to increase your power tool collection. I have only used 24V batts with my circ saw as they like a lot of power. I've read on this forum and other places that the Ridgid 18V as well as 18V Makita, Hitachi et all are whimpy for saws.
                Have fun with those tapcons...Ray

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: R8823 Impact Driver

                  So, am I understanding that it has a 1/2" square-drive for sockets, and an internal hex socket which will accept a screwdriver bit? Maybe a square-head drive bit?

                  If so, how is he drilling for tapcons?

                  Dang, this thing has some torque. Might just furiously tear up my plastic firring-strips.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: R8823 Impact Driver

                    Originally posted by Quantum View Post
                    So, am I understanding that it has a 1/2" square-drive for sockets, and an internal hex socket which will accept a screwdriver bit? Maybe a square-head drive bit?

                    If so, how is he drilling for tapcons?

                    Dang, this thing has some torque. Might just furiously tear up my plastic firring-strips.
                    No, no, no. WE are talking about two different tools here. The R8823 is a "impact tool" and has a hex drive which is how he is driving tapcons with a screw bit.
                    The tool with the 1/2" square drive is a "impact gun" with much greater torque and intended to be used for entirely different applications.
                    Scroll to the top of this page and click on "products". Search on "impact tool" and then on "Impact gun" to see the two types or go to Ebay or Amazon or DeWalt or Milwaukee which both build both tools.....Ray

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: R8823 Impact Driver

                      Hm, the names are a poor choice.

                      Here's what I'm looking at, which has such ferocious torque:
                      http://www.ridgid.com/Tools/R8823-Du...r/EN/index.htm

                      So what kind of interface is that? All it says is "1/4" quick coupler", but doesn't explain it a bit. I know something about tools, but never heard of this. Does it accept a hex shank directly, like a screwdriver bit, or is there an interface device? Can it take a chuck of some kind? Is it always in rattle mode? Could it drill steel?

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: R8823 Impact Driver

                        Originally posted by Quantum View Post
                        Hm, the names are a poor choice.

                        Here's what I'm looking at, which has such ferocious torque:
                        http://www.ridgid.com/Tools/R8823-Du...r/EN/index.htm

                        So what kind of interface is that? All it says is "1/4" quick coupler", but doesn't explain it a bit. I know something about tools, but never heard of this. Does it accept a hex shank directly, like a screwdriver bit, or is there an interface device? Can it take a chuck of some kind? Is it always in rattle mode? Could it drill steel?
                        Yes, it accepts 1/4" hex shanked bits directly by simply pulling the end, sliding the bit in and releasing the end to lock it. It cannot be adjusted for different sizes like a drill. No interface required. It only starts to "impact" when enough resistance is detected to assist driving. To put Tapcons in, I predrill the hole in concrete using a hammer drill first. I then use the impact driver to drive the Tapcon home. You can use it to drill steel or other materials if you had drill bits with hex ends which you can get or by using an adapter. Because they generate so much torque, they are great for anchoring hardware such as Tapcons like I am currently using it for, tightening nuts and bolts, screws, etc. They are also great for loosening rusty or seized bolts. Because of their impact nature, they are less inclined to slip out of the screw seat.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: R8823 Impact Driver

                          Dang. So this can be used for 90% of my work (driving), assuming the torque is controllable so it doesn't tear up my plastic firring-strips. I could use it for 100% if there were a chuck adapter, but if this 1/4" hole is all it has it may not have the strength.

                          As it is dual-voltage I can keep my 24v batteries and charger. There will be occasions where I need to drill concrete, so maybe I have to keep my hammer-drill? Maybe I should have them all?

                          What is the difference between the rattle in the impact driver, and the hammer-drill's action, for drilling concrete? Seems the same. Does anyone know the internals?


                          What else is the quick-connect head designed for? Most hex masonry bits have a much larger shank. Isn't there something more, to justify use of this head?

                          Oh, any idea how much this weighs, compared with the 24v hammer-drill?
                          Last edited by Quantum; 11-27-2007, 09:30 AM.

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                          • #14
                            Re: R8823 Impact Driver

                            The torque is not adjustable and you kind of have to get use to all that power so you know when to "STOP". You can get a Jacobs type chuck to fit the 1/4" quick release. The impact gun is handy for all sorts of stuff. You can also get a 3/8" or 1/2" adapter to fit that quick release so you can use sockets to remove or tighten bolts. If you are going to do a lot of drilling in concrete I suggest you look into a small corded Hilti on e-bay such as the TE-5. These drills use SDS bits and are made to kick ***. Getting back to the differences between the impact gun and the hammerdrill, the impact gun requires a certain amount of resistance before it goes into "Impact" mode so you can't or don't want to use it for drilling concrete. The Hammerdrill, in hammer mode is designed for impact drilling.

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