Announcement Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.
Low RPM rotary Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Low RPM rotary

    Hello

    I am looking for a low RPM (1,000 to 5,000) rotary tool such as a Dremel or Mastercraft type. The only one's i've been able to come across don't go any lower than 5,000 rpm, out of the box, and i'm not mechanically inclined enough to take it apart and tinker with anything inside it to make it run slower.

    The lower the better, even down to 100 rpm would be the best.

    I'll be working with hard plastic exclusively, and want to look into this as a big time saver with drilling holes/polishing/etc without having it run so fast that it melts the plastic.

    Any solutions?

  • #2
    Re: Low RPM rotary

    Do you have compressed clean air in your shop? You'll need a good steady 6 CFM (more is better) at 90 PSI for what I have in mind. If you currently use air tools, I think you may like some of what I'll post about soon, but if it has to be electric, then I hope someone else has some good ideas.

    If you do have good shop air, try downloading this big .PDF file which is a catalog of industrial air tools. Then look at the red straight drill on page 17. It's the little one at the top of the page. If you know what a die grinder is, think of a slower speed version with a 1/4" keyed drill chuck on it. You might look at the others, but that little red one doesn't take so much air, isn't as heavy and doesn't make as much noise as the larger models would.

    http://www.siouxtools.com/pdfs/Indus...atalog7-06.pdf
    Last edited by Woussko; 12-11-2007, 12:41 PM.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Low RPM rotary

      look into low RPM tire buffers,

      http://www.thepartsbin.com/cartools/..._buffer-d.html

      http://www.toolfetch.com/Brand/Inger...Traffic+Leader

      http://www.google.com/products?sourc...=1&sa=N&tab=wf

      probly jsut a low cost variable speed drill would work as well,
      Last edited by BHD; 12-11-2007, 10:27 AM.
      Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
      "The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good."
      attributed to Samuel Johnson
      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
      PUBLIC NOTICE: Due to recent budget cuts, the rising cost of electricity, gas, and oil...plus the current state of the economy............the light at the end of the tunnel, has been turned off.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Low RPM rotary

        I'm not sure such a thing exists. Dremel style rotary tools use the speed to do their work. They don't have much torque so if you slow then down to the lowest settings, they just don't have the power to do anything useful. I think the key is in finding the right attachment for the task at hand. I've melted plastic with some of the bits when trying to do stuff, but never found I had to go slower than the lower settings to get the job done.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Low RPM rotary

          My low speed rotary tool for plastics would be a variable speed electric hand drill good up to about 1500 rpm, my drill press is good up to 3600 rpm.

          They both have real good torque at low rpm and if a flex shaft would help.

          http://www.eastwoodco.com/shopping/p...&keyword=13385
          Last edited by Davet; 12-11-2007, 11:49 AM.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Low RPM rotary

            Originally posted by Woussko View Post
            Do you have compressed clean air in your shop? You'll need a good steady 6 CFM (more is better) at 90 PSI for what I have in mind. If you currently use air tools, I think you may like some of what I'll post about soon, but if it has to be electric, then I hope someone else has some good ideas.

            If you do have good shop air, try downloading this big .PDF file which is a catalog of industrial air tools. Then look at the red straight drill on page 17. It's the little one at the top of the page. If you know what a die grinder is, think of a slower speed version with a 1/4" keyed drill chuck on it. You might look at the others, but that little red one doesn't take so much air, isn't as heavy and doesn't make as much noise as the larger models would.

            http://www.siouxtools.com/pdfs/Indus...atalog7-06.pdf
            Thanks for that suggestion, but unfortunately, im very limited in my work space, and electric is the only option.

            Originally posted by BHD
            Those might work, but im looking for something that is as versatile as a Dremel, with different attachments for different jobs i will require.

            Originally posted by Davet
            My low speed rotary tool for plastics would be a variable speed electric hand drill good up to about 1500 rpm, my drill press is good up to 3600 rpm.

            They both have real good torque at low rpm and if a flex shaft would help.

            http://www.eastwoodco.com/shopping/p...&keyword=13385
            This is probably the best option, thank you.

            Any other opinions are much appreciated.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Low RPM rotary

              Unfortunately, I only have limited work space, so electric is the only option, but post away your air suggestions too, it never hurts to know for future reference.

              I'm looking for a Dremel (like) tool because of the variety of attachments that I could use for all the different uses i require

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Low RPM rotary

                I've done some work on plastics (acrylic and polycarbonate) with a variable speed dremel type tool, and I've watch others do some really fancy work with these tools on plastics. I think the answer tends to lie in your touch and the tool your using. Remember, it is the surface speed of the tool's bit that causes the heating, so if your using a bit with a small (very small even) diameter it won't heat as much as a larger bit. A light touch is also important. I've found that a light sweeping motion with the tool works well.

                Now, if your really trying to hog out a lot of material you may want to look at a different tool, like a hand saw (coping saw), a drill or drill press with a forstner bit or a rotary rasp. Another very good tool is a sanding drum in a drill press or fixed drill. I've had good luck using my table saw to cut sheet stock down to size, works better than a jig saw.

                Another tip for polishing edges is to do fire polishing. Clean up the edge with sand paper, file or whatever to a clean, but frosted finish. Then use a propane torch to do the polishing. Try it out on some scrap first. It is really quite easy, but there is a fine (and quick) change from polishing to boiling, burning. Just keep the piece or flame moving so the temperature doesn't get too high.
                Dick

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Low RPM rotary

                  The work i'll be doing won't be large. Just small holes where necessary or shaving off excess plastic where it's not needed. Nothing major

                  Thanks for the suggestions

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Low RPM rotary

                    You might try a low power hand drill/driver, like even one of the rechargeables. Depending on the brand and model, you can buy with either a handle or a straight line similar to a powered screwdriver. These will surely be battery powered, but since "LiIon" is popular it may provide you with longer power-on time.

                    Many of these are in the neighborhood of 300 rpm and rather inexpensive, but are designed to take a standard hex shaft driver. But, you can buy a quick chuck for them, and then use any Dremel-type accessory.

                    Just a thought,

                    CWS

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Low RPM rotary

                      http://www.ares-server.com/Ares/Ares...oduct&ID=82822

                      This isn't exactly a rotary tool, more like a miniature drill but it sounds like it fits your needs perfectly. Variable speed from 140 to 1500 rpm and has more torque than a Dremel. Uses the same type of chuck too. Check out the Micromark catalog. They basically specialize in miniature specialized tools for delicate work like plastic.

                      There's also this mini grinder that takes a flex shaft attachment and goes down to 3000rpm:
                      http://www.ares-server.com/Ares/Ares...oduct&ID=60730

                      Mini drill press with flex shaft attachment and 2100, 4500 and 6500 rpm spindle speeds.
                      http://www.ares-server.com/Ares/Ares...oduct&ID=81631
                      Last edited by Velosapien; 12-11-2007, 09:24 PM.

                      Comment

                      Working...
                      X