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  • Rigid Router Question.

    A few months ago, I purchased the Rigid Router Kit and - though it has been used just once, so far - I think that I will be liking it very much. However, I wish to get a Bushing/Inlay setup for it, and wondered if anyone knew of any such attachment(s) which might properly fit my Router (Model# R2910).

    Advanced thanks.
    ~Blessings~

    Nathan

  • #2
    Re: Rigid Router Question.

    The two baseplates supplied with the R2910 are slightly different between the plunge base and the fixed base. They are interchangeable between the two bases though.

    One of the subbases with take the Porter-Cable type guide bushings for sure, and I think the other will take the Bosch-type guide bushings (but I'm NOT sure). The P-C-type guide bushings are 1-3/16 inch diameter and are almost a universal standard. As such, they are available from a few sources. I purchased a set from Lee-Valley this past fall for $32.50 and found them to be excellent. (http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.a...000,51208&ap=1) These are individully bagged, but I believe Rockler and some other dealers have similar sets that are boxed.

    The thing I like with Lee-Valley is that they have a matching set for use with your router table. ( http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.a...000,51208&ap=1 )

    For example, I purchased the Rockler "Router table package" #23293 ( http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?page=894 ) which comes with a mounting plate that is compatible with the Ridgid R2900 fixed base (you'd have to remove the handles on the plunge base to use it with this smaller mounting plate). The Lee-Valley table guide bushings fit that plate perfectly and thus allow you to fit a proper-size bushing to close the opening around the particular bit.

    You might also take note that there are many useful accessories for the router table, including inserts, feather-boards, etc.

    I hope this helps,

    CWS

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Rigid Router Question.

      Originally posted by CWSmith View Post
      The two baseplates supplied with the R2910 are slightly different between the plunge base and the fixed base. They are interchangeable between the two bases though.

      One of the subbases with take the Porter-Cable type guide bushings for sure, and I think the other will take the Bosch-type guide bushings (but I'm NOT sure). The P-C-type guide bushings are 1-3/16 inch diameter and are almost a universal standard. As such, they are available from a few sources. I purchased a set from Lee-Valley this past fall for $32.50 and found them to be excellent. (http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.a...000,51208&ap=1) These are individully bagged, but I believe Rockler and some other dealers have similar sets that are boxed.

      The thing I like with Lee-Valley is that they have a matching set for use with your router table. ( http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.a...000,51208&ap=1 )

      For example, I purchased the Rockler "Router table package" #23293 ( http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?page=894 ) which comes with a mounting plate that is compatible with the Ridgid R2900 fixed base (you'd have to remove the handles on the plunge base to use it with this smaller mounting plate). The Lee-Valley table guide bushings fit that plate perfectly and thus allow you to fit a proper-size bushing to close the opening around the particular bit.

      You might also take note that there are many useful accessories for the router table, including inserts, feather-boards, etc.

      I hope this helps,

      CWS
      CWS,

      First of all, I thank you for stepping up to help me in this matter. Secondly, it is good to know that I won't have difficulty in getting/using a bushing kit for my router. I had purchased a boxed Porter Cable Bushing set, from the local Rockler Woodworking outlet, but - on taking it back - was told that they could only be used on PC Routers. In fact, it was a worker, there, who advised me to see if RIGID offered a bushing adapter for my router's base.

      One other question; do all bushing kits incorporate an "Inlay" bushing template? I may not be articulating this properly, but one of the things that I need to do is to make a few 'Dutchmans' (I believe that's what they are called) to cover the openings left from the removal of an old, skeleton-keyed lockset in a door. I saw Norm (New Yankee Workshop) do such a thing in a project which had a small section of damaged wood. He was able to rout the recess, utilizing a bushing. Then, by removing a portion of the bushing's neck, he was able to rout out the patch (Dutchman?) for the previously routed recess. I have no problem with buying this particular Inlay bushing - if it doesn't come with a regular bushing set, but just wanted to know if it would be included.

      One other thing, is that this RIGID router will serve as my hand-held unit. I already have an older, Ryobi router, installed under the support table of my Unisaw. I may need to replace this one, though, because I am sure that there will arise a time when I will wish, maybe even need, to use a table-fixed router for an application.

      Last edited by NLAlston; 01-19-2008, 08:45 PM.
      ~Blessings~

      Nathan

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Rigid Router Question.

        Nathan,

        The Ridgid 2910 has many compatibilities with Porter-Cable accessories, including the router guide bushing. Like I mentioned earlier, one subbase is P-C compatible (I believe it's the fixed base), but they can be switched between the fixed base and the plunge base. (For example, I found the P-C edge guide that Home Depot carries is a perfect fit with the Ridgid router.)

        So, I haven't done any inlay work, so can't speak for that particular task, as I don't have a lot of experience with router work (I'm not familiar with the term "Dutchmans" at all). I did check the Lee-Valley site a second time and I see they have a couple of "Inlay sets", one which is P-C compatible. (Here's the link: http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.a...000,51208&ap=1 You'll note that it says it uses a 7/16 guide bushing, along with a inlay bushing and hex key. The previously mention guide bushing set (http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.a...000,51208&ap=1) includes a 7/16" bushing; so, in addition to that, you could just buy the inlay bushing and hex key (Item # 04J28.01) , which is priced at $5.75. Here is their free instruction on how this inlay setup works: http://www.leevalley.com/shopping/In...s.aspx?p=40701

        You could probably take your router or just the subbase to your local Rockler store and I'm sure they would provide you with a similar product and assistance.

        I hope this helps,

        CWS

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Rigid Router Question.

          CWS,

          You have certainly alleviated any concerns that I had, and have surely set me on the right path of travel. Again - many, many, many thanks.

          Also, I happened to find a site where information on cutting "Dutchmans" is laid out. Navigate to the bottom of the page (http://www.newwoodworker.com/rotrinlays.html) where you will find it. I wanted you to see this, as you mentioned how you had never heard of the technique before. And you never know...you (or someone else reading this) just may find the need for a 'Dutchman', at some time or another.
          Last edited by NLAlston; 01-21-2008, 01:10 AM.
          ~Blessings~

          Nathan

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Rigid Router Question.

            Nathan,

            Thanks for the link. I guess I've somehow overlooked the term "Dutchmans" in my reading. I've seen those "bowties" in several books, articles etc. I must admit though that I've never looked into doing such inlay work. Just looked too challenging for where I'm at right now with the router. Most of my past experience has been with general home carpentry and making a few simple things like bookcases, benches, etc. Now that I'm retired, we've been renovating an old house for the soon to be, future home. Almost there!!

            Right now, I'm getting ready to start building shelves for the library and then I have a new fireplace surround (mantle, cabinets, etc.) to build. That's still in the design phase. Perhaps some inlay work would be just the thing to add some unique flavor to it. Might try that out, so thanks for the information, I've saved it to my Woodworking file.

            CWS

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Rigid Router Question.

              Originally posted by CWSmith View Post
              Nathan,

              Thanks for the link. I guess I've somehow overlooked the term "Dutchmans" in my reading. I've seen those "bowties" in several books, articles etc. I must admit though that I've never looked into doing such inlay work. Just looked too challenging for where I'm at right now with the router. Most of my past experience has been with general home carpentry and making a few simple things like bookcases, benches, etc. Now that I'm retired, we've been renovating an old house for the soon to be, future home. Almost there!!

              Right now, I'm getting ready to start building shelves for the library and then I have a new fireplace surround (mantle, cabinets, etc.) to build. That's still in the design phase. Perhaps some inlay work would be just the thing to add some unique flavor to it. Might try that out, so thanks for the information, I've saved it to my Woodworking file.

              CWS
              Hey Buddy ~ you are quite welcome.

              I'd also like to say that your experience with woodworking mirrors mine, a great deal. I have dabbled into it, a bit, but had done nothing really major with my efforts. I had to take disability retirement, 1-1/2 years ago, and have since been building my tool arsenal - and trying to make the most out of the limited real estate in little my basement shop. I have never done anything even close to inlay work, but am game to give a go at it . I love being in my shop, and have had a blast of a time building the things that I have. It's now about stepping up the efforts & quality of my work.

              When all is said & done, there will be a great deal of pride filling you (and rightfully so) over the sweat, and other expenditures, that are being given via your home renovation efforts. I wish you the very best, and have no doubt that you will do exceedingly well with it.
              ~Blessings~

              Nathan

              Comment

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