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AC corded drills ... why no torque settings?

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  • AC corded drills ... why no torque settings?

    Just wondering how is that no one sells AC electric corded drills with a different torque settings on the chuck like they do with cordless drills? Is there a problem incorporating it with the AC corded drills?

    Regards,

  • #2
    Re: AC corded drills ... why no torque settings?

    I would think you have to differentiate between a "drill" and a "driver".

    A drill does not need a clutch/torque setting. It is not needed for drilling.

    A driver built with the intention of driving screws would need the torque limiting features you describe.

    I doubt you will find any corded "drivers" out there, but there may be a few.

    If you will notice, most manufacturers call their corless tools "drill/drivers" as opposed to just a drill.

    Hope this answers your question.

    Regards,

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: AC corded drills ... why no torque settings?

      Based on your response then, I have to ask then how come they don't sell AC corded drill/drivers? Just a thought?

      Thanks for replying!

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: AC corded drills ... why no torque settings?

        Next time you're at Home Depot look for a Ryobi D46CK. It's a corded 3/8" drill/driver with 24 torque settings.
        Teach your kids about taxes..........eat 30 percent of their ice cream.

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        • #5
          Re: AC corded drills ... why no torque settings?

          I don't know, maybe because they get better profit margins by selling cordless drills and batteries than just corded ones. Cordless drills are constantly evolving and people keep eventually upgrading to better models. Might as well keep them more attractive by offering more features.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: AC corded drills ... why no torque settings?

            Yep, Badger Dave is right... I have the Ryobi D45CK and use it often. Nice drill for the price, and though it may not be recognized as a top brand or quality tool, I have never had a problem with mine, and have used it often over the last four years. For the price you can't beat it and you never have to wait for the battery to charge!

            CWS

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: AC corded drills ... why no torque settings?

              Thanks for all the replies! I got the info I needed.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: AC corded drills ... why no torque settings?

                Here's my thought, it's a safety issue. I want a 1/2 inch drill with a torque feature to keep from getting hurt. Last weekend I was using a 1/2 drill bit. Just as the drill is ready to penetrate the steel plate, it grabs, twists my wrist, wrenches my shoulder and snaps the bit in half. If it had a torque control on it, it would have stopped the bit when it binds in the steel. I have had this happen several times. I'm an old fart, 64, so I am not as strong as I used to be. I would buy one of those drills in a heart beat, and I would be willing to pay a premium.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: AC corded drills ... why no torque settings?

                  If you have an electric impact wrench and can still locate a 1/2" drive impact chuck, then your problem is solved. But you will need hearing protection.

                  Impact chucks are expensive and hard to find. 1 of mine is actually an old school ridgid branded 1/2" drive impact keyless chuck.

                  Rick.
                  phoebe it is

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: AC corded drills ... why no torque settings?

                    Adjustable torque settings are important for cordless drills because battery life can be measurably extended by using the lowest possible torque setting for the job. Since that's not an issue for corded drills, they can always run at maximum torque (whether you need it or not).

                    Over the years I've gotten into the habit of automatically starting out with lower torque settings, and there is no question that I get a much longer battery run-time. I believe that Ryobi still makes that point in the promotion of their "auto-shift" drill.

                    Dan

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: AC corded drills ... why no torque settings?

                      Originally posted by cop704 View Post
                      Here's my thought, it's a safety issue. I want a 1/2 inch drill with a torque feature to keep from getting hurt. Last weekend I was using a 1/2 drill bit. Just as the drill is ready to penetrate the steel plate, it grabs, twists my wrist, wrenches my shoulder and snaps the bit in half. If it had a torque control on it, it would have stopped the bit when it binds in the steel. I have had this happen several times. I'm an old fart, 64, so I am not as strong as I used to be. I would buy one of those drills in a heart beat, and I would be willing to pay a premium.
                      Ajax Tools A1012 1/2" Impact Wrench Chuck
                      here is a 1/2 impact wrench chuck.

                      my big Dewalt and Makita 1/2 drills have a slip clutch in them,

                      personally I thought the chuck for the impact wrench would be a good Idea, I have used mine a few times but did not like the way it drilled, It worked and for it grabbing at the end it was great,
                      but I find letting pressure off before the bit breaks through the material is the best, that way the lip that is left on the last is thin and usually shears off when major twisting of the drill, as it is sucked in by the screw action of the bit and then stops at the end of the flutes.

                      ~~~~~~~~~~~Added in edit:
                      if one thinks that by adding the chuck to an impact wrench will replace a hammer drill it will not, there are few sites saying that by adding there chuck to the impact wrench will replace a hammer drill,
                      (an impact wrench works in rotational hammering a side hitting such as putting a wrench on a bolt and then hitting the wrench with a hammer)

                      where a hammer drill actually hammers the bit down in the hole, in much the same way that a star bit is used to hand drill a hole in concrete or rock with a hand hammer, but it rotates as well,

                      two diffrent types of motion and not really interchangable.

                      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

                      A few companies do make screw drivers that are corded, Dewalt has a good one, I have had and sued for years, they just are not cheap.
                      DW268 - Google Search
                      Last edited by BHD; 04-25-2013, 12:05 PM.
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