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  • #16
    Re: Cordless Circ saw

    Thanks guys! Scratched an itch I've always had.


    Eli
    A good carpenter makes few mistakes, a great carpenter can fix his own.

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    • #17
      Re: Cordless Circ saw

      There is something that I realize that I never really noticed on blade right saws until recently. They all have a notched "window" up near the front of the blade. On some you can barely see the teeth and that window is used to sight your marked line on the wood that you will be cutting. On some saws it is useless as the notch is almost buried by the attachment apparatus that holds the sole plate to the saw, etc. I noticed this window when I bought the Ridgid Fuego. The windowed notch area is huge. The upper blade guard (immovable) is moved up out of the way allowing more sight, the notch in the sole plate is bigger and you can see the mouth of the bottom blade guard. When you stand holding the saw to make the cut through that huge window area you see blade, guard, cut line everything without any effort or bending over the saw. Same huge notch is on the Max Select 18/24 volt as the Max Select and Fuego have the 6 1/2" blade. I've gone back and looked at all my other sidewinders and finally realized why I had to look over the saw to try to make a good cut to see the blade. Take a look and you'll see the notch, but it's a matter of engineering and design as to how useful it is. Stop by HD if you don't have a 6 1/2" saw and take a look too and you'll be surprised as to how much blade you'll see.

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      • #18
        Re: Cordless Circ saw

        thanks CW...

        i was more interested in why you liked the right-handed style more...but the other info was cool too...thx

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        • #19
          Re: Cordless Circ saw

          I think it is just a matter of what you get used to. When I was a kid and first used a circular saw (about 12 or 13 I think), all that I knew was the big, heavy, all metal (usually chromed) circular saw. With my skinny little arms, I could barely handle the saw and frankly it always scared me a little.

          Right after we bought our first house in 1969 (I think I was 24 then), I bought a Craftsman 7-inch. First circular saw I had seen with the auxiliary handle in front, for your left hand. I thought it was great. Still pretty damned skinny, that extra handle gave me a lot more control and I loved it.

          I've never been in the trades, but basically have always done my own maintenance and remodel work around the house. So I never saw a so-called "left-handed" saw until a few years ago. By then, I'd had over 40 years of experience with "right-handed" saws. I still have that 1969 Craftsman and it's still the saw of choice for me. Fortunately, it takes 7-1/4 inch blades just fine.

          CWS

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          • #20
            Re: Cordless Circ saw

            Originally posted by DeuceLee View Post
            isn't that saying the same thing?

            glad i don't have the 18volt one then...
            I've got both. I like my 18 volt one more because it is a left blade. I wish I could plug my 24v battery in it too. The max select with a left blade and BLADE BRAKE would be the ideal saw for me.

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            • #21
              Re: Cordless Circ saw

              i wouldnt touch a right blade saw

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              • #22
                Re: Cordless Circ saw

                Well, I'm a semi-ambidextrous lefty, who's learned to use everything bass-ackwards in a right-handed world. So I'm semi-screwed no matter what.
                Last edited by canucksartech; 02-01-2008, 10:24 PM.

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                • #23
                  Re: Cordless Circ saw

                  I read somewhere that it's because the original circular saws used big and heavy motors. When the cut was complete, it was better to have the weight of the saw on the stationary piece instead of resting on the piece in the air. Putting the weight of the motor on the free piece would break the piece off before the cut was finished. Anyone else heard this?

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