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  • Cordless Circ saw

    why is Rigid the only company that offers a Right Handed cordless circ. saw...don't get me wrong, I'm grateful, but why are all the others lefthanded. Doesn't leave me many options.

  • #2
    Re: Cordless Circ saw

    whoops, my bad...I just saw one on the Makita site. Well, I guess you can't go by what you only see in stores.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Cordless Circ saw

      Actually, Ridgid has both styles. The MaxSelect and the 24 volt XLi cordless circ saw is right handed. The 18 volt version from the 18 volt kits (the one with the aluminum base, I believe), is left handed.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Cordless Circ saw

        Originally posted by canucksartech View Post
        Actually, Ridgid has both styles. The MaxSelect and the 24 volt XLi cordless circ saw is right handed. The 18 volt version from the 18 volt kits (the one with the aluminum base, I believe), is left handed.
        isn't that saying the same thing?

        glad i don't have the 18volt one then...

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Cordless Circ saw

          To me, this looks like a saw for right handed people, with the blade on the left - I'm right-handed and find it easy to use with good visability of the blade.

          http://www.amazon.com/Milwaukee-0730.../dp/B0009F7Q3K

          This Makita also looks handy with the blade on the left.

          http://www.amazon.com/Makita-5620DWD...1664726&sr=1-2

          These, the MaxSelect and 24 volt from Ridgid, however, do not look as handy, seeing as the blade is on the right making you have to stand/look at a weird angle.

          http://www.ridgid.com/Tools/R885-Cir...w/EN/index.htm

          http://www.ridgid.com/xli/

          I notice some of their other models show the left hand placement of the blade but not the above.

          Then again, I may have misunderstood the meaning of Right Handed in the first post that the poster was left handed and looking for a blade on the right. If so, then this post is not terribly enlightening.
          Last edited by tinmack; 01-29-2008, 11:53 PM.
          I'm on "The List" and I love it!!

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Cordless Circ saw

            Originally posted by tinmack View Post
            To me, this looks like a saw for right handed people, with the blade on the left - I'm right-handed and find it easy to use with good visability of the blade.

            http://www.amazon.com/Milwaukee-0730.../dp/B0009F7Q3K

            This Makita also looks handy with the blade on the left.

            http://www.amazon.com/Makita-5620DWD...1664726&sr=1-2

            These, the MaxSelect and 24 volt from Ridgid, however, do not look as handy, seeing as the blade is on the right making you have to stand/look at a weird angle.

            http://www.ridgid.com/Tools/R885-Cir...w/EN/index.htm

            http://www.ridgid.com/xli/

            I notice some of their other models show the left hand placement of the blade but not the above.

            Then again, I may have misunderstood the meaning of Right Handed in the first post that the poster was left handed and looking for a blade on the right. If so, then this post is not terribly enlightening.

            I always wondered about this too. The blade on the right is considered a right handed saw, but I have a hell of a time with it because I have to look across my body in order to see the line. I always thought maybe it is just because I learned with the west-coast worm drive models and now that is what I am comfortable with.

            Anybody know the history of this?

            Eli
            A good carpenter makes few mistakes, a great carpenter can fix his own.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Cordless Circ saw

              Originally posted by DeuceLee View Post
              isn't that saying the same thing?

              glad i don't have the 18volt one then...
              No. The 24 volt version and the MaxSelect version are (apparently) different. Look damn near identical, but the model numbers are different. The MaxSelect versions have something special/extra to the tools, some sort of voltage modulator I guess, to allow them to work with either 24 volt or 18 volt batteries.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Cordless Circ saw

                Originally posted by woodenstickers View Post
                I always wondered about this too. The blade on the right is considered a right handed saw, but I have a hell of a time with it because I have to look across my body in order to see the line. I always thought maybe it is just because I learned with the west-coast worm drive models and now that is what I am comfortable with.

                Anybody know the history of this?

                Eli
                The way that I always understood it, this is so the blade is as far away from your body as possible (basically outside of your hand positioning). Yes, it's a pain to look over the body of the saw, but it's so the blade is further away, and not inside your hand reach and closer to your body.

                That's the way it was explained to me by a crusty old fool once. But, then again, he was a drunk. Seemed like a fair explaination, though.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Cordless Circ saw

                  Originally posted by woodenstickers View Post
                  I always wondered about this too. The blade on the right is considered a right handed saw, but I have a hell of a time with it because I have to look across my body in order to see the line. I always thought maybe it is just because I learned with the west-coast worm drive models and now that is what I am comfortable with.

                  Anybody know the history of this?

                  Eli

                  Don't know the history, all I know is the left side blade placement is comfy for me. I'd probably rip my left hand to shreds if I had to look at a right side placed blade. Say, why don't they refer to the "side" rather than "handed'?
                  I'm on "The List" and I love it!!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Cordless Circ saw

                    Both of my plug-in circular saws are so-called "right-handed" saws and I must admit that watching the blade track is a bit cumbersome, but that's what I learned with and I've never given the blade placement a thought, one way or the other.

                    However, I did buy an 18-volt combo last year and it had the cordless circular saw with the blade on the left. I used it several times and really liked it, especially the fact that the blade was located where it was now much easier to see. Actually, it came to a point where I began to wonder why all circular saws weren't built in that fashion.

                    Then one day a few months ago I was running some wire in the attic and had to cut through some ancient subfloor (1887). Although I had brushed the area clear, I failed to see a nail and I hit it with the circular saw. In and instant, I realized why the right-side location of the blade was the better design!!!! Fortunately, the blade hit the edge of the knee pad I was wearing and not my jeans or leg. I've since learned to keep my body well clear of the blade, even if I have to reach a bit.

                    So, maybe your old friend was right.

                    CWS

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Cordless Circ saw

                      Originally posted by CWSmith View Post
                      Both of my plug-in circular saws are so-called "right-handed" saws and I must admit that watching the blade track is a bit cumbersome, but that's what I learned with and I've never given the blade placement a thought, one way or the other.

                      However, I did buy an 18-volt combo last year and it had the cordless circular saw with the blade on the left. I used it several times and really liked it, especially the fact that the blade was located where it was now much easier to see. Actually, it came to a point where I began to wonder why all circular saws weren't built in that fashion.

                      Then one day a few months ago I was running some wire in the attic and had to cut through some ancient subfloor (1887). Although I had brushed the area clear, I failed to see a nail and I hit it with the circular saw. In and instant, I realized why the right-side location of the blade was the better design!!!! Fortunately, the blade hit the edge of the knee pad I was wearing and not my jeans or leg. I've since learned to keep my body well clear of the blade, even if I have to reach a bit.

                      So, maybe your old friend was right.

                      CWS
                      can u explain this a lil further? i'm confused...

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Cordless Circ saw

                        Originally posted by canucksartech View Post
                        The way that I always understood it, this is so the blade is as far away from your body as possible (basically outside of your hand positioning). Yes, it's a pain to look over the body of the saw, but it's so the blade is further away, and not inside your hand reach and closer to your body.

                        That's the way it was explained to me by a crusty old fool once. But, then again, he was a drunk. Seemed like a fair explaination, though.
                        This is the way I always thought about it as well. It makes sense considering most people are right handed and sidewinders are traditionally built with the blade on the right, away from the sight line. The idea was to keep the blade away and out of line with your body, not to make it more visible.

                        I'm right handed and the first time I tried a left blade saw was when I got my first cordless one. I thought it was pretty cool since now I could very clearly see the blade. The first thing I noticed when I used it was the having the blade on the same side kicked all the dust in my face.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Cordless Circ saw

                          I found it a little wierd too using the ridgid with the right hand blade after using a left hand dewalt for many years. But, I have gotten used to it, and have found benefits to having both types.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Cordless Circ saw

                            DueceLee,

                            The term "right-handed" or "left-handed" may be a bit misleading as I don't think either saw is designed for use exclusively for one person or another. But the terms do pretty much define the location of the blade, in referance to the motor.

                            So, with a so-called, "Right-handed" circular saw, picture gripping the saw in your right hand: the motor will be to the left of your thumb, towards your body, and the motor will be to the right of your knuckles, the motor, and away or "outboard" of body. Hence, in the description that I presented, picture yourself on your knees on the floor, and cutting into the floor with the saw. The motor would be closest to your body (in my case, near my right knee) and the blade would be in a position that you'd have to lean over the saw, in order to see exactly where the blade was cutting.

                            Using a so-called "left-handed" saw, in the same position, holding it with your right hand, the blade would now be to the left of my thumb or "inboard" and closest to your body; while the motor would be "outboard" or on the right-side of the blade and away from my body. Advantage here is that you can observe the blade cut, without leaning over the saw. In that position, the blade is right there, within easy view.

                            Now, picture what would happen if either saw "kicked" when hitting a nail or a knot. With the "right-handed" saw, the motor is between your knee and the blade. Chances are, if the saw jumped back and toward you, the motor would most likely be the only thing that contacted your body in that position, as the blade is away from you. But with a "left-handed" saw, the same "kick" could bring the blade in dangerous proximity, as it's the closest part of the saw.

                            So, does this make one more dangerous than the other? I guess it depends on whether you are left- or right-handed. The traditional design is right-handed and held in your right hand, the motor is between you and the blade. But, you have to lean over to watch the blade. If your left-handed and use the traditional design, then the blade is closest to you.

                            All things considered, I guess safety perception, reality, and comfort in use depends a lot in which hand you're used to hold the saw. Bottom line however, is that circular saws of any type are inherently dangerous and one needs to keep their wits about them and think thru exactly what in heck they're doing and what body parts may be in danger should the blade bind or kick-back! I've been very fortunate to be "scared" a couple of times. I try to learn from this, as it's much better to be scared and then be cautious, rather than be cut.

                            I hope this helps,

                            CWS
                            Last edited by CWSmith; 01-31-2008, 02:34 AM.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: Cordless Circ saw

                              The sight line is a reason, but the cut off and the saw's support is also an issue, some [refer to have the saw on the non cut off side, right blade you can view the cut line fron the inside of the blade. I think both saws are equally dangerous or safe .

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