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  • Wet/Dry Vacs....need some help

    1
    Last edited by Tyman; 02-22-2010, 07:34 PM.
    Anyone can tear a man down, few can build one up.

  • #2
    Re: Wet/Dry Vacs....need some help

    If you need a good one for sucking up lots of dry dirt and also water, I would take a good look at what Milwaukee has to offer in the way of their good models which are made under contract with Mastercraft Industries.

    I must warn you that they don't come cheap, are on the heavy and bulky side and you buy them in more or less kit form. That is you buy the basic machine, then the hose and then the attachments-accessories that you need. They don't come as a complete package deal. This is because professionals have all different needs when it comes to their vacuum cleaner and how it will be used. Below are some models to look at along with the accessories. What's great is that parts are available and these are very much repairable machines.

    8911 - Good basic model
    http://www.milwaukeeconnect.com/weba..._192222_192137

    8912 - Same but with improved motor and 3 stage fans
    http://www.milwaukeeconnect.com/weba..._192222_192137

    8925 - Model for a King
    http://www.milwaukeeconnect.com/weba..._192222_192137

    8926 - The big beast of them
    http://www.milwaukeeconnect.com/weba..._192222_192137

    Accessories and such
    http://www.milwaukeeconnect.com/weba..._192628_192327

    Please note that while Milwaukee has other models, these are the models of choice for the serious. The above all use very good paper dirt collection bags that are sized to the drum size. They aren't cheap but they hold loads of dirt and dust. These machines may not be what you have in mind, but they are worth looking over.

    With regard to the RIDGID "Anger Vac" I hope you kept the box for it. I would clean it out and return it to Home Depot telling them that it is defective. See if they will either replace it with another or give you store credit which might be the better choice. I hope other forum members will reply with their experience on this model. Did you leave the cartridge filter in the machine for the wet pickup? Removing the filter (people need one for wet and one for dry) and running it without a filter installed for wet pickup can end up with the vac spraying water. This is for other makes and models too. My genuine ShopVac 10 gallon model is such. The filter must be in place for wet and/or dry pickup.
    Last edited by Woussko; 02-02-2008, 12:38 AM.

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    • #3
      Re: Wet/Dry Vacs....need some help

      Tyman, gotta tell ya, I love your avatar picture. Completely classic baby photo. "Ahhh! Camera!"
      Last edited by canucksartech; 03-20-2008, 10:32 AM.

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      • #4
        Re: Wet/Dry Vacs....need some help

        Try it with a new filter installed and sucking up clean water. It might be wise to take it outside (in case it sprays water all over) and suck water from a pail or two.

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        • #5
          Re: Wet/Dry Vacs....need some help

          I also believe that you need to have the filter installed. I do the same with my 5 gallon Ridgid vac. I use a cheap single-layer filter for water and wet debris pick up, and the dual or triple layer filters for dry pick up.

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          • #6
            Re: Wet/Dry Vacs....need some help

            I don't have that particular model, but have used one of my Ridgid 12-gal units, one of my little Ridgid "Stingers", and both of my old Sears 5-gal shop vacs for wet pick-up. (I can't remember the model #'s on those, but they were vintage late 70's, green in color.) Only the "Stinger" says to remove the filter, which is a paper bag-type.

            No problem with either of the old Sears, except that I should have never lent them to a friend... got them back months later with the water and sludge still in them, and lots of mold and rust. To say the least, we're NOT friends any more!

            My Ridgid 12-gal sucks water really fast, but with the tank drain it's easy to dump the barrel. The manual says to leave the filter in place for small volumes, but to remove it for large amounts. But it does say that misting will occur should the filter become saturated. I've not used it for more that spills, and two summers ago when the basement had seepage from an abundance of rain. Neither time, was there so much accumulation that it rose above the bottom of the filter. I can only guess that the vac is powerful enough to blow the water right through the container, if the filter was removed. I am under the impression that some negative pressure differencial (filter in place) is essential, or else the motor/fan is simply going to act like a pump, blowing the contents right through the container.

            My Stinger, did a fine job of sucking up dirty water, but what a mess it made of the motor and and cage that the bag would normally cover. I don't recall too much spray, but there was some mist being discharged. Motor isn't nearly as powerful as the Ridgid 12-gal though.

            So, as suggested, give your vac a try with the filter in place and see what happens. BTW, what does your manual say about using this unit for wet-pickup? (Sorry, I couldn't find a link to download the manual.)

            CWS
            Last edited by CWSmith; 02-03-2008, 04:51 PM.

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            • #7
              Re: Wet/Dry Vacs....need some help

              If you can find it in the US, then consider the Bosh GAS 50. I have the GAS 25, and it has done every task amazingly. The only problem being that my wife borrowed it when her "civilian" vac died, so now the issue is finding my Bosch when I need it!
              I think that the 50Ltr modell will be best for your needs, ie: ca. 10 gall. then overflow is not a problem. You can do wet or dry bag/bagless as desired, with a self cleaning electrostatic filter.

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              • #8
                Re: Wet/Dry Vacs....need some help

                Ridgid has a lifetime warranty, just bring it back you will get another one with no hassle
                Carpenters make the prettiest firewood

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                • #9
                  Re: Wet/Dry Vacs....need some help

                  Originally posted by CWSmith View Post
                  I don't have that particular model, but have used one of my Ridgid 12-gal units, one of my little Ridgid "Stingers", and both of my old Sears 5-gal shop vacs for wet pick-up. (I can't remember the model #'s on those, but they were vintage late 70's, green in color.) Only the "Stinger" says to remove the filter, which is a paper bag-type.

                  No problem with either of the old Sears, except that I should have never lent them to a friend... got them back months later with the water and sludge still in them, and lots of mold and rust. To say the least, we're NOT friends any more!

                  My Ridgid 12-gal sucks water really fast, but with the tank drain it's easy to dump the barrel. The manual says to leave the filter in place for small volumes, but to remove it for large amounts. But it does say that misting will occur should the filter become saturated. I've not used it for more that spills, and two summers ago when the basement had seepage from an abundance of rain. Neither time, was there so much accumulation that it rose above the bottom of the filter. I can only guess that the vac is powerful enough to blow the water right through the container, if the filter was removed. I am under the impression that some negative pressure differencial (filter in place) is essential, or else the motor/fan is simply going to act like a pump, blowing the contents right through the container.

                  My Stinger, did a fine job of sucking up dirty water, but what a mess it made of the motor and and cage that the bag would normally cover. I don't recall too much spray, but there was some mist being discharged. Motor isn't nearly as powerful as the Ridgid 12-gal though.

                  So, as suggested, give your vac a try with the filter in place and see what happens. BTW, what does your manual say about using this unit for wet-pickup? (Sorry, I couldn't find a link to download the manual.)

                  CWS
                  also, is there a hose attachment you can get to intentionally blow water out the back of it? i.e. I'm sucking water out of a kiddy pool, and want to simply spray it on to the grass behind the wet vac. Is THAT an option? With an ancillary attachable hose?
                  I welcome any feedback.
                  Thanks.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Wet/Dry Vacs....need some help

                    I don't believe that a wet/dry vac would serve as a "spray" system. It's not designed for that purpose and though there may be some liquid in the outlet air, I would think that would only be because the water level in the tank has reached a level where the air stream is skimming the liquid from the surface of liquid building up in the container. Most, if not all wet/dry vacs are equipped with a float or some similar device to prevent liquid from being sucked into the motor electrics and/or exhausted in quantity from the container. (Imagine the mess that would occur if such protection was not designed into the system!)

                    A vacuum does not work like a pump, forcing out as much liquid as it takes in. Basically, the job of the motor is to force a vacuum on the container by evacuating the air from the container. As the air is drawn out of the container and blown out the exhaust port, the air pressure inside the container drops. The inlet hose used to pickup dust and debris and even liquid is simply the counter-action of normal air pressure trying to relieve the vacuum that has been created inside of the container.

                    If debris and/or liquid is in the intake air flow, it should drop to the bottom of the container, thanks to gravity. Obviously some particles will be caught in the air stream and will try to evacuate with the air being pulled out of the container by the motor's fan. The "filter" will strain particals over a certain size (defined by the filter type) out of the evacuated air stream.

                    The filter may or may not strain water, and if the filter is not designed for the particular liquid it could easily clog, or worse disentigrate and be pulled through the fan. The filter serves two purposes, first and foremost to "clean the air flow that is being evacuated"... and second, it protect the motor, and the fan. As previously mentioned, there is usually a float device that prevents liquid from reaching a height that will interfere or damage the motor and it's electrics.

                    I hope this helps,

                    CWS
                    Last edited by CWSmith; 07-10-2009, 01:32 PM. Reason: error: notice bold "over" which originally read "under"

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                    • #11
                      Re: Wet/Dry Vacs....need some help

                      Originally posted by redraiduzz View Post
                      also, is there a hose attachment you can get to intentionally blow water out the back of it? i.e. I'm sucking water out of a kiddy pool, and want to simply spray it on to the grass behind the wet vac. Is THAT an option? With an ancillary attachable hose?
                      I welcome any feedback.
                      Thanks.
                      There is an accessory but the vac has to not running and have a hose outlet on the tank.
                      http://www.ridgidparts.com/accessories/VP2000.phtml

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                      • #12
                        Re: Wet/Dry Vacs....need some help

                        Thank you, CWS. That explanation helps greatly. And I went and got a sump pump, and it turns out I'll need both the pump and the vac. The pump for the majority of the draining, and then the vac for the latter part, once it gets down to about 2"-3" deep.

                        Again, thanks.

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                        • #13
                          Re: Wet/Dry Vacs....need some help

                          For dealing with floods you might like this type of shop vac vac where you don't have to lift it or tip it full of water to empty it.

                          Professional model: http://www.shopvac.com/vacs/list.asp...a%20Pro%20Pump

                          Consumer models: http://www.shopvac.com/vacs/list.asp...s=Ultra%20Pump

                          Be sure to watch the demo video.

                          If you have a RIDGID brand shop vac with a drain cap on the side of the drum near the bottom, you may like this accessory for it.
                          I think this has to be purchased online rather than at Home Depot.
                          http://www.ridgidparts.com/accessories/VP2000.phtml
                          Last edited by Woussko; 07-03-2009, 01:43 PM.

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                          • #14
                            Re: Wet/Dry Vacs....need some help

                            Originally posted by Woussko View Post
                            If you have a RIDGID brand shop vac with a drain cap on the side of the drum near the bottom, you may like this accessory for it.
                            I think this has to be purchased online rather than at Home Depot.
                            http://www.ridgidparts.com/accessories/VP2000.phtml
                            I bought one of those at HD, and it also fits my Craftsman vac.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: Wet/Dry Vacs....need some help

                              We got a 12gal Ridgid WD12000 originally to vac up the water from a flooding carpeted basement. I removed the filter and it did a great job.

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