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Ridgid 18v Drill Question

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  • Ridgid 18v Drill Question

    Hi All.

    Last weekend I bought the Ridgid 18v cordless drill kit (model #R840011) at Home Depot. It was on sale and the salesperson recommended over the B&D drill that I originally went in for. Got home and immediately charged up the batteries and went to work on the basement reno that's in progress (I had wrecked the $50 "Diablo Dragon" drill I bought in the fall at HD trying to use the hammer drill feature to drill some Tapcon holes. Oh well, you get what you pay for, but I digress...)

    What I noticed was that on the driver setting, the chuck did not spin. I could actually hold the chuck with my hand and pull the trigger and the drill would make a loud clacking noise like the gears inside were slipping. I brought the drill back and exchanged it for another of the same model, and am having the exact same problem with the second. It works fine on the drill setting, but the driver setting is useless. What are the chances of getting 2 drills with the same defect? Anyone else have this experience?

    I'll probably bring it back and exchange it again, but this time I'll try the new drill in the store before bringing it home.

    - R.

  • #2
    Re: Ridgid 18v Drill Question

    What number setting are you putting it on? These drills have a clutch to keep you from driving a screw in too deep, such as when installing dry wall. The lower the number, the sooner it will start to slip. This is probably what you are feeling.

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    • #3
      Re: Ridgid 18v Drill Question

      It sounds to me like you have the clutch set at a very low level rather than a drill defect. When you put the drill on the driver setting you need to adjust the numbered clutch ring behind the chuck to the corresponding torque setting of whatever you're trying to drive. The lower the number the quicker the clutch will slip under load. The idea is that the chuck will stop just as the screw is set in place and avoid overdriving or stripping it out. You'll need to play around with the settings until you find the right one for the task.

      If you're trying to drive tapcons I actually recommend you leave the drill on the drill (non-hammer) setting and set the speed to low gear. Tapcons are a bit finicky going in and if the clutch slips halfway it can have a hard time getting the screw to restart again which also risks wallowing out the hole if it needs to be backed out and restarted. Basically you want to get the feel for driving it in all the way on the first try and stop the drill right as you feel it reach full tightness.

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      • #4
        Re: Ridgid 18v Drill Question

        Thanks for the advice! I just tried out the drill and you're exactly right. Obviously I'm not as familiar with the drill's features as I should be, and the "Diablo Dragon" did not have the same type of clutch. (What would one expect from a drill that only cost $50 and is called "Diablo Dragon"?!?)

        Incidentally, after wrecking that cheap cordless drill trying to drill into concrete, I was ready to rent a good hammer drill from HD when my father-in-law brought over his old 1980's Skil corded drill with the solid steel body, no reverse, no hammer drill setting, and two speed settings - "on" and "off". The thing drilled into the concrete floor almost as easily as through wood. I guess you can't beat the classics!

        Thanks!

        - R.

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