Announcement

Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.

What tools are needed?

Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • What tools are needed?

    I first visited this forum, as someone completely new to doing any construction or woodworking, asking questions about power requirements and space of two different Ridgid table saws. Based on some responses, I see I need to take a step back and evaluate just what tools I really need for projects like those below. The only power tool I have now is a Ridgid MS1065LZA 10" compound miter saw. I am open to buying whatever is necessary to do the projects below. I thought I would need a table saw to cut sheets for a work bench, a bookcase, garage cabinets. But, can I do this with a good circular saw, blade, and straightedge, or is that even a good idea? Just trying to buy the right tools the first time.

    - Overhang for a patio.
    - Deck construction.
    - Work bench for garage and nicer bench for wife's hobbies (inside).
    - Sprinkler valve box (to hide and shield valves).
    - Bookshelves (including floating type).
    - Closet shelving.
    - Shoe rack, simple bookcase, stereo rack, shadow box, stair railing.
    - Crown molding & baseboard (I have the Ridgid 10" miter saw).
    - Garage cabinets, racks, tool storage.
    - Deck bench, chairs, railing, etc.

    Everyone here has been exceedingly helpful and generous of their time, in response to my elementary questions. Thank you for your patience.

    - Phil

  • #2
    Re: What tools are needed?

    I would say a Fuego circular saw with a diablo blade would be good as well as an impact driver for the deck and a small drill/driver like the 12 volt Li-on tool for the cabinets. A table saw would be good for finish cuts.
    For all Repair and Cleaning needs in DFW, call THAT GUY! 817-565-7508

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: What tools are needed?

      Quite honestly, the tools you need are fairly basic. The toos you want to make the job easier can be quite extensive. The reason I say this is my grandfather was a master woodworker, his shop was a very nice shop with all the modern tools one could ask for (circa the early 90's). I spent a decent amount of time with him in that shop, and of all the things I learned in there, one of the things I didn't learn was how to use all the "new" tools. Grandpa turned out very high quality pieces, and that was using his basic tools.

      He always told me the key to any cutting tool, no matter what it is, is the blade. Keep it sharp and it will cut as well as anything, but even the most expensive tools will cut like dirt with a crappy blade.

      That being said, it does take a fair amount of patience and throw some skill in there as well to make fine quality pieces without some of these high end tools. Although my grandfather probably would have said the opposite, that it takes more skill to use the fancy tools than it does the basic's.

      I guess what I would suggest is get the basic tools that are needed for most jobs. Things like a table saw, an air compressor and maybe a nailer or two, a random orbit sander, a belt sander, the common hand tools like a hammer and nailsets, a few good quality squares, measuring devices (I greatly prefer folding measuring sticks over a tape measure for any accurate woodworking projects), you'll need a drill and bits, and you might as well pick up a circular saw as well.

      Now, personally I wouldn't run right out and pick up these things. I would wait until the projects tell me I need them unless of course their is one heck of a good deal on them. Then you can judge by the project which tools are what you really need, insted of going out and buying tools and then realizing you bought something that really isn't going to suit your needs.

      Jeff

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: What tools are needed?

        Originally posted by Phil3 View Post
        I first visited this forum, as someone completely new to doing any construction or woodworking, asking questions about power requirements and space of two different Ridgid table saws. Based on some responses, I see I need to take a step back and evaluate just what tools I really need for projects like those below. The only power tool I have now is a Ridgid MS1065LZA 10" compound miter saw. I am open to buying whatever is necessary to do the projects below. I thought I would need a table saw to cut sheets for a work bench, a bookcase, garage cabinets. But, can I do this with a good circular saw, blade, and straightedge, or is that even a good idea? Just trying to buy the right tools the first time.

        - Overhang for a patio.
        - Deck construction.
        - Work bench for garage and nicer bench for wife's hobbies (inside).
        - Sprinkler valve box (to hide and shield valves).
        - Bookshelves (including floating type).
        - Closet shelving.
        - Shoe rack, simple bookcase, stereo rack, shadow box, stair railing.
        - Crown molding & baseboard (I have the Ridgid 10" miter saw).
        - Garage cabinets, racks, tool storage.
        - Deck bench, chairs, railing, etc.

        Everyone here has been exceedingly helpful and generous of their time, in response to my elementary questions. Thank you for your patience.

        - Phil
        Phil,

        If you want to bust up sheet goods yourself, then you probably should get a circular saw instead of/before a table saw. To cut up sheet goods on the TS you'll need to get several roller stands (for cutting a full 4'x8' sheet, you need at least 3 of them if not more: 1 infeed, 1 off cut, 1 good cut) - or build an outfeed table.

        To do it with a circular saw, you'll need 4, 2"x4"s to support the piece, and a nice jig. To make the jig all you need is a piece of luan ($15) and a nice straight 1x2 ($1, but you need to be careful to pick a straight one). Screw the one 1x2 flush to a factory edge of the luan, then run your saw tight against the 1x2 cutting off a strip about 5" wide (real width depends on your saw). You can then just use a couple of $1 spring clamps to hold your jig onto the plywood (supported by two 2x4 on each side of the cut), and your final cut will be right along the edge. For a lot of work this is probably easier than wrestling with a sheet and the table saw. I busted up a couple of sheets of plywood this weekend, and chose this method instead of using my 3650 (at least until I get a chance to build the outfeed table).

        You could in theory get sheet goods precut at HD or a lumber yard, but I always want to do it myself anyway.

        If you don't already have one, get yourself a cordless drill. I always used a corded DeWalt until 3 months ago when I got a Ryobi One+ drill for $40 with a battery and a charger. I haven't picked up my DeWalt since then, and now am waiting for a good combo kit to go on sale, because I want a cordless circular saw and vacuum (and a second drill so I don't have to change bits).

        You should also get a random orbital sander, it can be pretty aggressive, but you can also use it for your final finishing.

        The other tool that you may want to consider is a jig saw for your deck chairs so you aren't restricted to straight lines. I finished an Adirondack Chair from Classics from the New Yankee Workshop a couple of weeks ago, and am very happy with the result.

        Finally, the one thing that you might want a TS for is ripping boards to whatever width you need. You could do it with an edge guide in the circular saw; but I much prefer to use the TS with the fence.

        Charles

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: What tools are needed?

          Originally posted by cpw View Post
          Phil,

          If you want to bust up sheet goods yourself, then you probably should get a circular saw instead of/before a table saw. To cut up sheet goods on the TS you'll need to get several roller stands (for cutting a full 4'x8' sheet, you need at least 3 of them if not more: 1 infeed, 1 off cut, 1 good cut) - or build an outfeed table.

          To do it with a circular saw, you'll need 4, 2"x4"s to support the piece, and a nice jig. To make the jig all you need is a piece of luan ($15) and a nice straight 1x2 ($1, but you need to be careful to pick a straight one). Screw the one 1x2 flush to a factory edge of the luan, then run your saw tight against the 1x2 cutting off a strip about 5" wide (real width depends on your saw). You can then just use a couple of $1 spring clamps to hold your jig onto the plywood (supported by two 2x4 on each side of the cut), and your final cut will be right along the edge. For a lot of work this is probably easier than wrestling with a sheet and the table saw. I busted up a couple of sheets of plywood this weekend, and chose this method instead of using my 3650 (at least until I get a chance to build the outfeed table).

          You could in theory get sheet goods precut at HD or a lumber yard, but I always want to do it myself anyway.

          If you don't already have one, get yourself a cordless drill. I always used a corded DeWalt until 3 months ago when I got a Ryobi One+ drill for $40 with a battery and a charger. I haven't picked up my DeWalt since then, and now am waiting for a good combo kit to go on sale, because I want a cordless circular saw and vacuum (and a second drill so I don't have to change bits).

          You should also get a random orbital sander, it can be pretty aggressive, but you can also use it for your final finishing.

          The other tool that you may want to consider is a jig saw for your deck chairs so you aren't restricted to straight lines. I finished an Adirondack Chair from Classics from the New Yankee Workshop a couple of weeks ago, and am very happy with the result.

          Finally, the one thing that you might want a TS for is ripping boards to whatever width you need. You could do it with an edge guide in the circular saw; but I much prefer to use the TS with the fence.

          Charles
          Thanks for your reply. I would be having HD break up 4 x 8s to something manageable, since I have no vehicle to even carry something that big. But I may need a single 8' length that is 2' - 3' wide (long bench top surface, long run of closet shelving, etc.). I would just need to be sure it is square with straight sides. Is the circular saw/jig sufficient, or is a table saw a better option. Curious as to why you prefer a TS for ripping over the circular saw. Accuracy, ease, or...?

          Cords don't bother me, but have never had cordless, and it seems many really like it. What did you find as the biggest attraction after using cordless for a while?

          Will examine the other tools recommended.

          Thanks again.

          - Phil

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: What tools are needed?

            I think Jeff has given you some excellent advice.

            To go along with that, from my own experience, you really should let the project determine the need for any particular tool. I'm now in my early 60's, and in the midst of a renovation on what will most likely be my final home. I also intend to have a great shop, and to that end, I've made a lot of tool purchases in the last three or four years. To the point where I'm beginning to feel more like a "collector", having surely bought some things that would be "nice for the shop" but I haven't really put them to work yet. Most of that was for "deals" that were too good to pass up.

            So looking back at the first tools I bought some 30 to 40 years ago and seeing the list of projects that you have listed, I realize that many of them were very much like the stuff that I was first challenged with.

            Don't ask me why, because I don't have much of an answer, but my first tools were a Stanley Level, carpenters square, and a couple of hammers, nail sets, tri-square, and two handsaws, as well as a couple of tape measures and a 4-ft measuring stick. I wasn't in the trades or anything, but must have figured a young single guy just ought to have some tools. I did some carpentry work with my Dad, but that was mostly during high school.

            After I got married and we bought our first home, I added a 3/8-inch variable speed drill, a Portalign Drill Guide, circular saw, a belt sander and a jig saw. I also bought an adjustable miter box and back saw and a good variety of screwdrivers. With those tools, I built some bookcases, a desk, repaired both front and back porches and built some stairs, as well as just general stuff like repairs, shelves in the kitchen and closets, etc. Key to much of that was using a "factory edge" piece of ply as a guide for ripping with my circular saw.

            My first and only big power tool for most of my life, was a Craftsman Radial Arm Saw which I bought in 1974, a few months after selling the house and moving out here to start my career with the Rand. I did some repairs in the duplex we rented, built a clothes rack for all the wife's stuff, a workbench for our son, and a rather elaborate train table for the HO set.

            It took us seven years to find a house we could afford here, and when we did, all the tools (especially the RAS) went to work again. The RAS was the workhorse for building the 18 x 25 deck, renovating the attached garage into a family room, and making a lot of shelving for the pantry, basement, closets etc.

            About four years ago, I found myself "retired" and after too many years of blind dedication to the job, it was time for me to do something really worthwhile and I started the "Honey Do" list. My RAS had been stored ever since I built the deck some 20 years prior and not knowing my future, I simply did not want to dig it out. Instead I built a cross-cut guide for the circular saw and it proved invaluable to turning out several bookcases.

            It was at this time that I also bought my first new power tools since 1974. That was a Ryobi Corner Cat detail sander and a 5" Random Orbital Sander. Since then I've added a variety of tools like a small bandsaw, benchtop belt/disc sander, some folding work tables, clutch driver, and a few cordless tools. Most everything I have purchased in these last four years has been at greatly reduced prices and I've saved a bundle picking up such things on holiday closeouts, inventory clearances, etc. Secret is to just keep some cash in reserve so you can take advantage of such things when you see them.

            In the last two years we've been renovating an 1887 house that we purchased for "retirement". Big house for us, it's taken a lot of labor, some hired, some not. I'm now getting ready to start building the new library and so have finally put the old RAS back together. Likewise I've finally unboxed and assembled my Ridgid DP1550 and have recently finished the new router table. I had purchased a small table saw (Ryobi BT3100) a year or so ago, and by now, I've run enough trim and "play" stuff through it that I feel relatively comfortable with it's use. (It's my first table saw.) The shop, though a temporary setup, is finally ready to go into action I think.

            The point of all this is, that for me, a shop was a long time in coming. With a few tools, I've still managed to do quite a bit. The bigger tools didn't come until very late, yet things like bookcases, shelves, benches, and even the deck and a lot of renovation and repair work got done without their existance. Yes, they would have lent precision and efficiency to the tasks, but they weren't essential to getting it done.

            So, purchase what your budget allows and let the project guide you with regard to the need.

            I hope this helps,

            CWS

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: What tools are needed?

              Originally posted by Phil3 View Post
              Thanks for your reply. I would be having HD break up 4 x 8s to something manageable, since I have no vehicle to even carry something that big. But I may need a single 8' length that is 2' - 3' wide (long bench top surface, long run of closet shelving, etc.). I would just need to be sure it is square with straight sides. Is the circular saw/jig sufficient, or is a table saw a better option. Curious as to why you prefer a TS for ripping over the circular saw. Accuracy, ease, or...?
              BTW, here is a circular saw straight edge jig. I wouldn't have no problem using it on something that is 2'-3' ft. wide, I did it this weekend. I wouldn't even have a problem with something that is about 8" wide, but any thinner than that there isn't enough support for the saw; and it is hard to get something that thin to be supported well. This is also why I prefer the TS for ripping. You can also repeat a cut on a TS, you can't do that very well with a jig like this (you can come close with a stick that is cut to length to use as a guide though; measuring to repeat something is probably hopeless).




              Originally posted by Phil3 View Post
              Cords don't bother me, but have never had cordless, and it seems many really like it. What did you find as the biggest attraction after using cordless for a while?
              For any job around the house I found that it was really nice not having to find the outlet, pull the child protectors off, plug in, make sure I could reach what I needed, when I wanted to set down the drill find a pretty large flat surface to set the drill down (all the cordless drills can be set down in a tiny foot print), then unplug, wrap the cord, replace the outlet protector. If you are doing something of any size with a cord you often end up needing an extension cord which is just one more thing to put away.

              I wouldn't get rid of my corded drill, because I may need that power someday or run out of charge; but for $40 the convenience is a huge win. Also, get yourself quick change bits if you don't have them already; they really save time when you are alternating between predrilling pilots and screwing.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: What tools are needed?

                Originally posted by Phil3 View Post
                Thanks for your reply. I would be having HD break up 4 x 8s to something manageable, since I have no vehicle to even carry something that big.
                I do it with a 1997 Nissan Sentra [about as small as you can get] and one of these:
                http://www.amazon.com/Highland-20052...teaser_product

                When I got it, it shipped direct from Amazon with super saver shipping for only $20. I just strap these to the car, and then tie down the sheet goods using a ratcheting tie down [$14.88 for four Workforce ones] on each bar.

                I like doing it myself, because I can rethink things and don't need to have the detailed plan and make sure that think things through at the store; I can instead take my time at home and not have to search for someone to operate a panel saw.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: What tools are needed?

                  i think a good corded skilsaw and a good cordless drill and a jigsaw probably a tablesaw maybe a basic router and a sawzall would be a good starter kit

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: What tools are needed?

                    Also I might add, buy quality tools. It's much easier to do a little research and spend a little more the first time, than to buy cheap and have to buy again. Cheap tools can sometime ruin the fun in a project.
                    Never get in an argument with a fool, bystanders won't know which one is which.....

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: What tools are needed?

                      Originally posted by Big Dog View Post
                      Also I might add, buy quality tools. It's much easier to do a little research and spend a little more the first time, than to buy cheap and have to buy again. Cheap tools can sometime ruin the fun in a project.
                      Absolutely. "Buy nice, or buy twice" is my approach. Sometimes that results in overkill (i.e., I really like the Skil SHD77M worm drive saw).

                      - Phil

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: What tools are needed?

                        Originally posted by CWSmith View Post
                        The point of all this is, that for me, a shop was a long time in coming. With a few tools, I've still managed to do quite a bit. The bigger tools didn't come until very late, yet things like bookcases, shelves, benches, and even the deck and a lot of renovation and repair work got done without their existance. Yes, they would have lent precision and efficiency to the tasks, but they weren't essential to getting it done.

                        So, purchase what your budget allows and let the project guide you with regard to the need.

                        I hope this helps,

                        CWS
                        Yes, it does help. I whole-heartedly agree that projects should dictate the tools needed, but am finding that I am not educated enough to answer the question of what tools are needed. That is, I don't know enough to decide whether a tablesaw, sliding compound miter saw, circular & guide, etc. is best for what I need to do. There is overlap on capabilities, which makes it hard to say without hesitation, "this is the tool I need". I want to do things right, and know all too well that working with "make-do" tools is a mistake.

                        I need to make a simple workbench, and if I have the top surface sheet cut at a lumber yard, it would appear I need nothing more than my miter saw for the rest. But, if I need to cut a 18" - 24" square panel, that is probably too small to manage with a circular saw, but perhaps too small for a SCMS, so does this mean I need a TS? Hope this makes sense?

                        Thanks,

                        - Phil

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: What tools are needed?

                          Originally posted by cpw View Post
                          I do it with a 1997 Nissan Sentra [about as small as you can get] and one of these:
                          http://www.amazon.com/Highland-20052...teaser_product

                          When I got it, it shipped direct from Amazon with super saver shipping for only $20. I just strap these to the car, and then tie down the sheet goods using a ratcheting tie down [$14.88 for four Workforce ones] on each bar.

                          I like doing it myself, because I can rethink things and don't need to have the detailed plan and make sure that think things through at the store; I can instead take my time at home and not have to search for someone to operate a panel saw.
                          Those look good, and since Home Depot is 2.9 miles away on slow streets, should work well. Do you think this would work on an SUV with a roof rack. The roof rack top is curved, so does not work well with flat lumber.

                          - Phil

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: What tools are needed?

                            one can do all you want to build with a hammer and a hand saw, possibly a chisel and a few other hand tools, and time.

                            but depending on the the way you want to do it, and the fun of it,

                            I would suggest a table saw, If you have that many projects you would enjoy a table saw.
                            I would want a few good blades and a quality dado head, (on ply wood you will want a very good one, to not splinter the veneers, one can use a straight edge an use a knife to precut the dado to limit splintering,)


                            and like many said, a mim of a 3/8" variable speed Drill, (cored or cordless, I find if cordless units unless used fairly ofter have premature Battery failure.) but the convenience of a cordless is a treat.

                            some like a kreg jig and use pocket screws for some assembly and strength, (i really like the unit), some like biscuit jointery, some like mechanical joints, (dado, rabbits, dove tails, etc), with other jointery methods a dado head may not be necessary. or wanted.

                            many like a router for cutting datos, and doing joints and decorative edges, and if you have a good straight edge or make a jig one can use like jointer,

                            some like to get into air nailers, very nice, (my old one died the begging of the week it was 30+ years old, and I replaced it all ready, this was a old framing nailer).

                            If I need to start over, I would probly replace the above tools first, with many more to follow, as projects changed,

                            If you were jsut looking at doing one thing and then storage of the tools, I would say use the skill saw and whack it together either borrow or rent if you need some thing else,
                            but since it looks like you have a list of projects and my guess you come up with more, then go for it, enjoy life. BUY tools,
                            Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
                            ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
                            "The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good."
                            attributed to Samuel Johnson
                            ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
                            PUBLIC NOTICE: Due to recent budget cuts, the rising cost of electricity, gas, and oil...plus the current state of the economy............the light at the end of the tunnel, has been turned off.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: What tools are needed?

                              Originally posted by Phil3 View Post
                              Those look good, and since Home Depot is 2.9 miles away on slow streets, should work well. Do you think this would work on an SUV with a roof rack. The roof rack top is curved, so does not work well with flat lumber.

                              - Phil
                              The one thing I would be worried about is if the crossbars would be able to fit without the existing roof rack getting in the way. Have you tried cutting a 2x4 stud in half and putting that on top of the roof rack like cross bars on the eixsting rack?

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X