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  • TS3650 RPM Question...

    Hello Gents,

    I have been reading this forum for information on the TS3650 and I must say there is a wealth of information.

    I noticed the specs on this saw have it listed at 3450RPM. Most of the other saws are much higher, the amps are around 13 for the 110 setup, where some others are at 15amps.

    At 3450RPM is it going to be strong enough to power through heavy woods?

    I'm a rookie to wood working. So I don't know much about saws and the like. Any light shed on this would be great.

  • #2
    Re: TS3650 RPM Question...

    I have ripped 2 1/4" kiln-dried white oak with both 50TPI (tooth per inch) and 60 TPI blades, dadoed 3/4" wide by 1" deep, and have resawn white oak to max depth (3 1/2" approx) with this saw. IMHO it is about as good a saw as you will find that can run on 120v.
    You state that you are a newbie to woodworking, so I think this is one of the best saws to start on. If you are getting into production work, where time is of the essence and the saw will be getting hours of use daily, then a true cabinet saw in the 3+HP range (220v and possibly 3 phase) would be more appropriate. If you fall into the "hobby" class, where you make your own furniture and some for customers, than this saw will do that.
    Also, realize "more RPM" does not mean better performance. A 5000 RPM saw at 15 amps does not have as much torque (the power needed to push the cutting edge through the wood) as a 13A 3450 RPM saw. Higher speed also means more impact to the cutting edge and more heat buildup from friction, both which contribute to faster deterioration of the blade. This has long been a factor in the design of drill presses, and recently in jig saws and routers in order to lower the speed to prevent destroying the cutter/blade.

    JMTCW

    Go
    Practicing at practical wood working

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: TS3650 RPM Question...

      For what it's worth I really think the 3450 RPM is for the motor. Typical arbor speed for a well designed 10 inch contractor, hybrid or cabinet style table saw is about 3000 RPM. If run too fast there will be burning of both wood and blade teeth. As for the TS3650 and the new TS3660 (very similar from what I've read they) they may not be heavy duty production machines but they also sure aren't toys. As long as you give the saw time to cut, it can and will cut through hard woods over 2" thick. A good blade of the proper type for the kind of cutting really makes a difference. A good crosscut blade isn't going to do well for ripping and a good ripping blade should not be used for cross cutting work. There are safety issues involved with the proper and improper blades.

      Put simple for a serious home woodworker this table saw should give you good service for a long time given proper care. Take your time and carefully set it up during assembly.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: TS3650 RPM Question...

        On a two pole induction motor the electricity has the electricity going around the motor as 3600 rpm, but the way the induction works the electricity is Inducted into the core of the motor and in the process a "slip" occurs and this slip is what creates the toque of the motor, and on most induction motors they will operate about 3450 on a four pole motor that would run at 1800 rpm the slip is usually in the 1750 range.

        To run a motor at a faster RPM usually there a brush motor, and many times will run on either AC or DC, a router or vacuum cleaner motor for example.


        on the table saw motor RPM and the pulley ratio, is what determines the speed of the arbor,

        I do not know what it is right now, (I have read it) but most saws are designed for a rim speed or feet pre minute, of the tooth travel,

        and yes there is a relation ship on RPM and torque, for a given horse power, the faster it revolves the less torque there is, the more torque the less speed, kinda like a race car and a tractor, both may have the same horse power, but they use it differently,

        about the only complaint that I have read on the Ridgid belt drive table saws is that if you do not follow directions the belt may not get tight enough to not slip in heavy cuts,

        and on any saw, if you have heavy wood and thick wood, if you do not have enough horse power it may bog down the motor,

        a lot of the limiting factor on most contractor type table saws is to usually keep them so they will operate on normal house current, so your limited by about 14 amps of run draw, which would basically be a 1.5 horse motor, or so, under normal conditions, I believe they do use a dual voltage motor so it can be used on 220, but I believe it come wired for 110 volts,

        If you look into professional 10" cabinet saw, you can see horse power ratings up to 5 hp and many times there even 3 phase, on a 10" Delta Unisaw saw, or a powermatic, even though the old units only had a 1 to 1.5 hp motors on them, they were wound differently than an induction motor many times, so they would torque out better, when loaded.

        for most home shop needs the motor that comes on the saw will do most users a very good job,
        Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
        ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
        "The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good."
        attributed to Samuel Johnson
        ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
        PUBLIC NOTICE: Due to recent budget cuts, the rising cost of electricity, gas, and oil...plus the current state of the economy............the light at the end of the tunnel, has been turned off.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: TS3650 RPM Question...

          Don't be fooled into thinking that a higher amperage motor is a better motor. That is far from the truth and it is something many tool makers use to make their tool appear better than the next one. It is very possible to have a 13 amp 1.5 horsepower motor, or a 13 amp 1 horsepower motor and so on. Shop for horsepower, get the most horsepower you can afford.

          Also don't buy any tablesaw that does not have a reset on the motor. You want a motor to have overloads on it. The cheaper saw will not have those. The 3650 has a very good motor on it.

          Jeff

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: TS3650 RPM Question...

            here is a third parties version of how to choose a table saw,

            http://benchmark.20m.com/articles/Se..._tablesaw.html

            I see very little I would disagree with,

            I have a older (1975 or so) Delta 9" contractors saw I used on job sites it has a 1 hp motor, and a old Walker Turner 10 cabinet saw, and it has a 1.5 hp motor on it, my guess it is a late 1940's early 1950's manufacture, yes on 2 in oak you have to have a sharp blade on it and feed it slowly, but on most 1" lumber you never have problems, Unless there is kerf pinch on the blade,
            Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
            ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
            "The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good."
            attributed to Samuel Johnson
            ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
            PUBLIC NOTICE: Due to recent budget cuts, the rising cost of electricity, gas, and oil...plus the current state of the economy............the light at the end of the tunnel, has been turned off.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: TS3650 RPM Question...

              I got to admit I just starting looking for table saws today. So I have learned quite a bit from you all, thanks very much. I would be in the hobbyist class .

              I was fooled by the RPM speed as well. I kept looking at the TS3650 even though I was fooled as it seems to be so popular here. Of course it is a ridgid forum so I looked other places as we...

              I had enough of building tables for the house with my ol broken down Skill circular saw (I don’t think it liked cutting those cinder blocks). Man that takes forever!!!

              The next project is a Pergola. I plan on using 6x6s for the posts, so I imagine that's going to cause a problem for the table saw... I believe the cut depth on this saw was 3 3/8"? So I could flip it over or is that a bit much?

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: TS3650 RPM Question...

                If you need to cross cut 6 x 6s you may want to look into a small chainsaw if you can deal with ruff sawing. If you need good clean and square cuts, try to see if there's a lumber yard with a monster radial arm saw that will cut them to length for you. A reciprocating saw with a long blade would work but it's very hard to get good clean and square cuts using one.

                One other thing you could try is calling up tool rental yards. There are 16 inch circular saws that would cut through 6 by lumber in one pass.

                Makita 16-5/16" monster circular saw:
                http://www.makita.com/menu.php?pg=pr...det&tag=5402NA

                Serious fence contractors use this circular saw for big fence posts.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: TS3650 RPM Question...

                  yep that makita will cut 6 inches deep I have had one for years, and it was originally for timber framing, I loaned mine to another contractor, for cutting SIPS (the insulated foam panels with wafer board on the out side)

                  cut the 6x6 posts, with a skill type saw, Mark all around and saw all 4 sides and then finish with a hand saw,

                  Handing a 6x6 post on a table saw is not a easy job, and actually dangerous IMO,

                  Table saws are better for ripping than cross cutting. a power miter box is better for cross cutting or a radial arm saw, (not really poplar now days). and a miter box will not work very well on a 6x6 post. It will work but one would have to rotate a few times.

                  and if your ripping 6x6 posts cut one pass and turn it over and finish it. but it will be a challenge for that a 10" contractors saw, of any make.
                  Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
                  ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
                  "The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good."
                  attributed to Samuel Johnson
                  ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
                  PUBLIC NOTICE: Due to recent budget cuts, the rising cost of electricity, gas, and oil...plus the current state of the economy............the light at the end of the tunnel, has been turned off.

                  Comment

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