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  • Drill Press Selection

    Hello,

    First, many thanks to all for helping me with decisions on obtaining a tablesaw. I will be paying the local HD a visit to put one of these in the garage (leaning to the TS2400LS). Next item is a drill press. No DP seems to have it all, at any reasonable price, but have decided to get a floor standing model. Some mention has been made of the limited power (1/2 hp) of the Ridgid DP1550. I will use the DP for wood and some steel (up to 3/16"), on rare occasion. Hole saw work too. Will the DP1550 suffice for this? I like the DP1550 for the price and generous quill travel (can punch through a 4 x 4).

    Thank you.

    - Phil

  • #2
    Re: Drill Press Selection

    [QUOTE=Phil3;130730]Hello,

    First, many thanks to all for helping me with decisions on obtaining a tablesaw. I will be paying the local HD a visit to put one of these in the garage (leaning to the TS2400LS). Next item is a drill press. No DP seems to have it all, at any reasonable price, but have decided to get a floor standing model. Some mention has been made of the limited power (1/2 hp) of the Ridgid DP1550. I will use the DP for wood and some steel (up to 3/16"), on rare occasion. Hole saw work too. Will the DP1550 suffice for this? I like the DP1550 for the price and generous quill travel (can punch through a 4 x 4).

    Phil, if you have some time look into a used Mark V machine by ShopSmith. I picked one up at a tag sale a couple of years ago for $100.00 and it is one amazing tool. It can do a number of woodworking jobs and as a drill press it is massive, powerful and precise. Parts are available and for the do it yourselfer it might be worth a look.

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    • #3
      Re: Drill Press Selection

      Phil

      I recommend trying to find a good industrial wood and metal working machinery dealer. Sometimes they have nice used machines at good prices. The JET line of machines have been pretty good for the most part and I've had very good luck with their smaller drill presses. Unlike the RIDGID these are more aimed at machinists working at home. There are several special features that make them very attractive including a female Morse taper spindle where you can remove the arbor and change chucks or direct drive taper shank drill bits. The RIDGID is a home owner model and not bad for the money, but later on, I really feel it would frustrate users in what it can and can't do. If you ever need to use a good size hole saw in metal or drill large holes with Forstner bits you must have good torque and a slow spindle speed. You'll also really like a good depth gauge and stop on a good drill press. I'm not trying to cut down the RIDGID but when people make an investment, they really should look around first. Hopefully stationary machines will be around in our workshops for a good long time giving good service. Nothing is prefect, but we owe it to ourselves to do some research before buying.

      As for Delta their older USA made drill presses are very good, but the newer DIY models from China just don't cut it. Again you have to compare models based in specs.


      If you can find a good price, this is what I would look into. It may be more $$$ and machine than you want now, but think about later on.
      http://www.wmhtoolgroup.com/Products...94&Part=354169


      Update: Woussko is a howling hound that just will never shut up. Woussko must go into The Woussko Hut, go to sleep and not howl anymore. THE END
      Last edited by Woussko; 03-23-2008, 11:57 PM.

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      • #4
        Re: Drill Press Selection

        http://www.kingcanada.com/Products.htm?ID=111

        would this be ok?
        on sale here for 259.$
        §m€llŸ™

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Drill Press Selection

          Originally posted by Woussko View Post
          Phil

          I recommend trying to find a good industrial wood and metal working machinery dealer. Sometimes they have nice used machines at good prices. The JET line of machines have been pretty good for the most part and I've had very good luck with their smaller drill presses. Unlike the RIDGID these are more aimed at machinists working at home. There are several special features that make them very attractive including a female Morse taper spindle where you can remove the arbor and change chucks or direct drive taper shank drill bits. The RIDGID is a home owner model and not bad for the money, but later on, I really feel it would frustrate users in what it can and can't do. If you ever need to use a good size hole saw in metal or drill large holes with Forstner bits you must have good torque and a slow spindle speed. You'll also really like a good depth gauge and stop on a good drill press. I'm not trying to cut down the RIDGID but when people make an investment, they really should look around first. Hopefully stationary machines will be around in our workshops for a good long time giving good service. Nothing is prefect, but we owe it to ourselves to do some research before buying.

          As for Delta their older USA made drill presses are very good, but the newer DIY models from China just don't cut it. Again you have to compare models based in specs.


          If you can find a good price, this is what I would look into. It may be more $$$ and machine than you want now, but think about later on.
          http://www.wmhtoolgroup.com/Products...94&Part=354169
          Your last comment is by far, my biggest puzzle. "...may be more $$$ and machine than you want now, but think about later on...".

          I am new to woodworking, or even having a shop. I don't know what future interest level I will have and the resultant requirement for tool quality and performance. It could easily be that the Ridgid is overkill, or that the Jet JDP-17MF is still not enough. I really don't want to grow out of something, but nor do I want to spend $$$ needlessly. Buying the right grade of tool depends on knowing your needs, and at this early stage, I really don't.

          Regarding the JDP-17MF, it is about $100 more than the Ridgid, but reviews on Amazon have not been all that kind to it. Frequent complaints on excessive vibration. $400 and I have to start fixing it? On the other hand, it seems like few drill presses in the under $500 range do all that well.

          I live in the San Francisco bay area, so should be plenty of machines available. But, not sure what kind of machine to look for. Brands, models, etc. And then there is the issue of getting the thing home!

          - Phil

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          • #6
            Re: Drill Press Selection

            I live in the San Francisco bay area, so should be plenty of machines available. But, not sure what kind of machine to look for. Brands, models, etc. And then there is the issue of getting the thing home!

            - Phil[/quote]
            There were 2 great used tool dealers in the Sf area I used to check out when in the area on trips.
            1 was in Oakland or San Leandro,I forget which now.They delt heavy in metal working tools and had some woodworking stuff.Very god prices for the quality offered.
            The other was in Santa Rosa off the old highway south end of town.The sign for that shop was hard to find as the actual store was down a narrow side street and it was very near the highway.A lot of the stuff they sold would be semi serviced ie maybe new bearings or a part replaced.
            Look in the phone book for those.Personally I had good luck with the couple things I bought from both.There was a big used dealer in Sac too that was good,bought my 1st metal lathe from them.
            Sam

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            • #7
              Re: Drill Press Selection

              Phil,

              I'm new to woodworking too, I have recently bought home both the Ridgid DP and a benchtop Ryobi, build qulaity is no comparison. For ~$130 more, Ridgid is a "minimalist" but is MUCH better built with a stronger and better motor (quieter and vib-free), and capability, and not to mention the LLSA it comes with.

              The Ryobi found it's way back to home (Depot)

              In my case, it should last me a LONG while. O other hand, I know exactly what Woussko means .. I bought a DeWalt 10" miter saw last year, a non-slider, did not want to spend the $$$$ ona slider which I di not THINK I would need. ... now I have laminate-flooring project onhand and I found that I "shoulda" bought a sliding miter-saw.
              Last edited by Wagon Man; 03-24-2008, 11:34 AM.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Drill Press Selection

                Originally posted by Wagon Man View Post
                Phil,

                I'm new to woodworking too, I have recently bought home both the Ridgid DP and a benchtop Ryobi, build qulaity is no comparison. For ~$130 Ridgid is a "minimalist" but is MUCH better built with a stronger and better motor (quieter and vib-free), and capability, and not to mention the LLSA it comes with.

                The Ryobi found it's way back to home (Depot)

                In my case, it should last me a LONG while. O other hand, I know exactly what Woussko means .. I bought a DeWalt 10" miter saw last year, a non-slider, did not want to spend the $$$$ ona slider which I di not THINK I would need. ... now I have laminate-flooring project onhand and I found that I "shoulda" bought a sliding miter-saw.
                I've found that stopping over on a tool like that isn't always bad [though I might not pick something as expensive as DeWalt as a "stop-over"]. About a year ago I got a 12" Ryobi CMS that isn't sliding; and so far it has done well. If I upgrade I'll probably go for the slider, but at least know I'll know that I need it. Same thing with my TS, I borrowed my dad's bench top long enough (2 projects) to decide that I need something better; and then new exactly what I was looking for and ended up with a 3650.

                If you spend less than 1/2 the amount on a cheaper tool that gets you by for a while, then you'll never spend more than twice optimal. If it is good enough, you'll keep it. If it isn't, then you'll spend at most 1.5 times as much. If you go for the big tool in the beginning, but never use any of the features you end up spending 2x as much as if you bought the cheaper tool.

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                • #9
                  Re: Drill Press Selection

                  Tks for sharing, CPW, yes, I've been trying to "spec out" the best of what I need... but this seems to be a moving target ... space, money, time (to gain skills), etc.....

                  A slider is still a "shoulda" in my case and I'm still happy with the 10" on-slider .. for $175 it ainlt bad for a proven DeWalt .. again, should last me a long time.

                  I will be using the TS2400LS to cut those laminates.. I will be running back & forth beteen room and garage, but at least there wonlt be MDF dusk all over inside the room (or house).

                  In fact, a slider could give me an excuse to make the cuts on site and contaminating the air indoor..... ... mistake!
                  Last edited by Wagon Man; 03-24-2008, 12:53 PM.

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