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  • TS3650 stalling

    I have a TS3650 saw. I use it occasionally for household chores when required. Later I hope to use it making different projects. My question has to do with cutting a 1/2" rabbit in 1" thick pine. If I reduce the height of the blade to 1/2" and try to make a cut the saw blade begins to stall and eventually will stop. The motor is still turning. What happened is the belt is so loose it slips when the blade is lower than 1". My motor has the pins through both holes in the support. The spring it uncompressed. If I move the motor so the support pins are only held by the outer set of holes then I can cut the rabbit. Is this correct? or am I missing some sort of tensioner for the belt or is the belt too large? Other than that issue, I think the saw is excellent.
    From what I've read there is lots of great information in the forums. I can see a lot of reading in the next little while.

    John

  • #2
    Re: TS3650 stalling

    Most likely, you probably didn't assemble the motor and belt properly. I would just start from scratch and go through the assembly setup one more time.
    ================================================== ====
    All of us could take a lesson from the weather. It pays no attention to criticism.

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    • #3
      Re: TS3650 stalling

      Thanks for the reply re stalling.


      The following is direct from the pdf of the TS3650

      Insert the two pins on the motor assembly into the holes
      in the mounting brace. Push in as far as it will go


      To me, that means both front and back holes in the mounting brace receive the pins of the motor to provide good support.


      Place your hand around the belt halfway between the two
      pulleys and squeeze the belt until the two sides of the belt
      touch. The motor should move freely as you squeeze the
      belt. If the motor does not move freely, the motor must
      be repositioned.

      With regards to the above paragraph --Should the motor physically move forward and compress the spring or does this refer to rotation of the armature?



      To reposition the motor, loosen the hex nuts on the
      mounting brace and either push the motor in or pull it
      out as needed. Check at maximum elevation also.

      So, if I do this, that removes the front supporting holes on the brace from supporting the motor. Are only 2 holes sufficient to hold the pins?

      My motor is positioned through both holes. quite possibly a slightly smaller belt would allow the bracket/spring/motor to flex while support for the motor is maximized.


      John

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      • #4
        Re: TS3650 stalling

        Originally posted by JohnCL View Post
        Thanks for the reply re stalling.


        The following is direct from the pdf of the TS3650

        Insert the two pins on the motor assembly into the holes
        in the mounting brace. Push in as far as it will go


        To me, that means both front and back holes in the mounting brace receive the pins of the motor to provide good support.


        Place your hand around the belt halfway between the two
        pulleys and squeeze the belt until the two sides of the belt
        touch. The motor should move freely as you squeeze the
        belt. If the motor does not move freely, the motor must
        be repositioned.

        With regards to the above paragraph --Should the motor physically move forward and compress the spring or does this refer to rotation of the armature?



        To reposition the motor, loosen the hex nuts on the
        mounting brace and either push the motor in or pull it
        out as needed. Check at maximum elevation also.

        So, if I do this, that removes the front supporting holes on the brace from supporting the motor. Are only 2 holes sufficient to hold the pins?

        My motor is positioned through both holes. quite possibly a slightly smaller belt would allow the bracket/spring/motor to flex while support for the motor is maximized.


        John
        The rods (pins) should extend through both holes in the cradle. You should not be able to pull them out of the back holes with the belt installed.

        The spring should be partially compressed with the blade at lowest setting, and almost (but not quite) fully compressed with the blade at full elevation. The tension is set with the blade full up.

        When you squeeze the belt, the motor bracket should move forward compressing the spring. With the blade full up, there should be enough movement left for the spring to almost reach full compression, but not quite (about 1/4" movement left).

        If the pins (the 1/2" diameter black rods in front of the spring/bracket assembly) are pulling out of the rear holes in the carrier with the belt on both pulleys, and the blade at full height, the belt is too long. On mine, the pins extend about 3/4" past the rear holes.

        Once the belt is tensioned, you have to tighten the hex head screws (not nuts) that are over the top of the back pin holes in the carrier assy to keep it in position.


        It sounds to me like you are trying to set the tension with the blade down, not fully up.

        Go
        Last edited by Gofor; 03-30-2008, 02:55 PM.
        Practicing at practical wood working

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        • #5
          Re: TS3650 stalling

          It may be that the belt is too long. It was set up as per the manual with the pins thru both holes and the blade fully extended. There was a bit of compression on the spring and more when the belt is pressed together. My problem is when the blade is lowered and trying to cut a 1/2" rabbit the belt is too loose and the blade stops, belt stops and motor keeps on spinning. Maybe there should be some sort of idler to keep constant tension on the belt regardless of the height of the blade.

          John

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