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  • #16
    Re: hanging drywall

    Originally posted by ctkeebler View Post
    I have never seen a $69.00 Ridgid 18v li-ion drill at home depot near me in Connecticut. Looking today at homedepot.com I see $187.00 18 volt drill but nothing else
    The $69 special might be sold out in your area but I still see a couple kits. That one Li-battery drill was a special that started at $129>$99>$79>$69 to introduce the Li-ion battery to consumers. There is an Ultimate Power Deal going on at HD till 4/30/08 so you can still get a great deal on a nice drill, i.e.: $187-30
    Do a search on this forum and you will find multiple threads on drill choices.
    Last edited by reConx; 04-20-2008, 11:45 AM.

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    • #17
      Re: hanging drywall

      I've done two house rehabs (our own houses) and have just used my 18V Ryobi drill with a dimpling bit. I first tried using one of the adjustable depth ones, but hated it. Buy a small multi-pack of the dimpling bits (I think HD sells DeWalt dimpling bits in a pack of 8 or something) because occasionally you'll cam out of the screw and strip your bit. Good to have some spares on hand so you don't slow down the work.

      Also, most of the time drywall is installed vertically. I've found that unless you have particularly high ceilings, installing them horizontally is easier, at both the point of installation and when finishing (less time on a ladder). Also, install the bottom one first so you have something to rest the upper one on. Drive some 16p nails above and against the first sheet, then rest the upper sheet on those to get a proper gap. Once the upper is attached, pull the nails out.

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      • #18
        Re: hanging drywall

        On rehabs I hang rock a little differently than Wood Junkie. I hang the top first then the bottom. The reason I do it this way is that often in a rehab the floors and ceilings are not parallel. If there is some trimming that needs to be done it is easier for me to tip out the bottom sheet and rasp it rather than lift the upper sheet down, trim it and put it back up. I have a little step-on thingie that I slide under the bottom sheet, step down on one end and it lifts the bottom sheet to whatever height I need. I generally work alone so this system works well for me.

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        • #19
          Re: hanging drywall

          Reading Wood_Junkie's comment, "most of the time drywall is installed vertically. I've found that unless you have particularly high ceilings, installing them horizontally is easier", brought a smile!

          I really don't know which is the "pro-way" of doing it and quite imagine it depends on the situation. As a home-owner with a few projects here and there, I've only done it horizontally, laying the lower sheet, first. I do like Tom W's suggestion of doing the top sheet first on old houses. Certainly if I was going to apply new drywall in the house I am currently renovating, that would be excellent advice as nothing in that 1887-built house is square, level, or parallel.

          But, on to the "smile" reason of my response to Wood Junkie's post:

          A good friend of mine is heavily evolved in Habitat for Humanty and I remember him telling me about a couple of new volunteers he had on a project a few years ago. They had lot's of experience supposedly and volunteered to do the drywall one weekend on the new ranch-style house the local group was building.

          My friend got a call late Saturday afternoon with the new guys telling him that they had run out of sheetrock. Not quite understanding what the problem was as he was sure he had procured enough, he jumped in his car and ran over there. What he discovered was that the two guys had installed all the sheetrock vertically.... cutting the ends off all the sheets to get them to fit properly.

          Not sure what the sheet size was, or what the ceiling height was, but I do recall my buddy was a bit upset at the time.

          CWS

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          • #20
            Re: hanging drywall

            Originally posted by CWSmith View Post
            Reading Wood_Junkie's comment, "most of the time drywall is installed vertically. I've found that unless you have particularly high ceilings, installing them horizontally is easier", brought a smile!

            I really don't know which is the "pro-way" of doing it and quite imagine it depends on the situation. As a home-owner with a few projects here and there, I've only done it horizontally, laying the lower sheet, first. I do like Tom W's suggestion of doing the top sheet first on old houses. Certainly if I was going to apply new drywall in the house I am currently renovating, that would be excellent advice as nothing in that 1887-built house is square, level, or parallel.

            But, on to the "smile" reason of my response to Wood Junkie's post:

            A good friend of mine is heavily evolved in Habitat for Humanty and I remember him telling me about a couple of new volunteers he had on a project a few years ago. They had lot's of experience supposedly and volunteered to do the drywall one weekend on the new ranch-style house the local group was building.

            My friend got a call late Saturday afternoon with the new guys telling him that they had run out of sheetrock. Not quite understanding what the problem was as he was sure he had procured enough, he jumped in his car and ran over there. What he discovered was that the two guys had installed all the sheetrock vertically.... cutting the ends off all the sheets to get them to fit properly.

            Not sure what the sheet size was, or what the ceiling height was, but I do recall my buddy was a bit upset at the time.

            CWS
            Good story, you just know they had to be 8ft ceilings and 10ft lenghts of rock. I was taught that if you are going to install horizontally, do the top sheet first and make it good to the ceiling the bottom can be a bit off towards the floor because the baseboard will cover it up. Sound right? I've watched many guys tape rock but the best I ever saw was my wife's uncle. He was a master carpenter and installed some sheetrock in our first home. He did a horizontal piece up top, one on the bottom and a ten inch piece in the middle. Then he did something I never saw, he applied some mud and taped the two joints and with a 16" curved trowel gave it one pass! I swear it was as smoothe as a baby's butt. Any of you pros use the curved trowel? Well, in any event it impressed the heck out of me.

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            • #21
              Re: hanging drywall

              Originally posted by Wood_Junkie View Post
              Also, install the bottom one first so you have something to rest the upper one on.
              I dis agree with this way of doing and below I will explain why,

              first you put up the ceiling for dry wall, then you hang the wall horizontal, (two reasons and mu dding is the first, as your working the main seam at seam at 4 foot, the top sheet is pushed up tight to the ceiling helping hold the edges , you will actually get less seam tearing and cracking if you let the edge of the ceiling "float" by not screwing it the last 8 " or so to the out side wall, and let it set on the wall sheet, then the seconds sheet (lower) is staggered on a stud,
              the lower sheet is then pushed up and held up into place with a "Drywall Roll Lifter" a foot device that will give one leverage to raise it using ones foot. http://images.orgill.com/200x200/0300574.jpg I have used a flat pry bar and a block as well, in a pinch

              The 4 foot wall seams you can work in one stroke where the ends meet. thus making a better looking seam.

              usually leaving a small gap at the floor, one it doesn't not get wet if water covers the floor), and usually gives room for flooring or finish floor to go. it will be covered up by trim.

              ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

              Tools for mudding first a mud pan with good edges, either plastic or metal, two 6' knife, and 8" to 10" knife and finally a 12" knife. (yes there are those occasions that narrower a 18" knife is used but that is not a normal), some people like the trowel and hawk (a carry over from wet walling), I think unless one is experienced, one will get the knack of using a knife quicker than using a dry wall trowel, (and the cement trowel and drywall trowel are different width and curvature) they are not interchangeable.

              use the 6" knife in the corners, I do not have any problems doing both sides at once but if you do, do one side and let it dry, and do the other side of the corner, (you will have to mud both sides and tape it all at once),

              (if you want some speed in doing seams get a "banjo", and that will apply the mud to the tape, and you can tape it out fairly fast in comparison to hand taping, (but unless you a lot to do I suggest hand taping it,
              applying the mud, (use a thick coat under the tape) then apply the tape and then squeeze the mud out holding the knife about 75 to 80 degrees to the wall making a clean swipe,

              the seams normally need three passes, a using a 6" knife applying the tape, the 8" second coat and the 12" top,

              out side corners I usually use the metal bead and then mud in using a 6" knife, and if necessary wider,

              yes there are times you need some touch up or additional passes, nail holes I use three passes on walls and normally you can get by with two on the ceiling, but if in doubt do another pass,

              I use lay prefill deep holes or break outs or damage,

              before sanding I use the 12" knife to scrape off any ridges or buggers of mud, (a pole sander will make things go fast as well, you have leverage and can sand standing up and on the floor, like said before us as minimal amount of mud and eliminate the bulk of the sanding.
              when sanding try not to fuzz the paper.

              ~~~~~~~~~~~

              make approximately a 2 foot tall stand, (for an 8 foot ceiling) ( measure your height and ceiling height, for correct height of the work stand), about 16" wide and 4 foot long more of a bench for a work stand, ( now have nice aluminium work stands) but when I first started, I had two wood units, and wore a hard hat to hang the rock up the hard hat you could rotate under the sheets easily and added the extra 1" I need to meet the ceiling, I would first nail the edges in the taper, and then use the screw gun, (at first it was all hand nailing, for me the screw gun came late in the picture), the Screws help eliminate the pop offs,
              many (expecily those who do know know what there doing use a dry wall lift, and if working by your self or need some time to manipulate and get it attached the lift is a good way to go,
              the stand is still a great DIY way to do the seams and taping, I used the dry wall stilts, If you do use dry wall stilts, clear the floor of all scraps and blocks or any type unless you want o crash and burn,
              one other suggestion, I like to (if hand taping, not using a banjo) I like the mud pan holder and the tape roll holder. It is nice not to have to chase the mud pan or to chase the roll of tape, and to have it at your side. (they hook on to your work belt)

              and in MY OPINION throw that net tape as far as you can throw it, if you want a good job, use paper tape,

              a light texture will help if your having trouble getting your seams not to show or getting them flat. either hand applied or spray on,
              Last edited by BHD; 04-20-2008, 08:31 PM.
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