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  • hanging drywall

    I am a diyer and looking to hang drywall in my basement redo. I dont want to purchase a drywall gun for the job, but rather purchase a drill or driver that I can use again.

    My question is will the new rigid 12v have enough power/torque to perform the job or do I need something bigger

  • #2
    Re: hanging drywall

    Originally posted by ctkeebler View Post
    I am a diyer and looking to hang drywall in my basement redo. I dont want to purchase a drywall gun for the job, but rather purchase a drill or driver that I can use again.

    My question is will the new rigid 12v have enough power/torque to perform the job or do I need something bigger
    While you are waiting for an answer from the experts, I'd like to suggest buying a drywall gun. This tool is designed to drive the screw head below the surface of the drywall and saves you tedious job of gauging how far you will drive each screw. I'm pretty sure you could use a cordless drill but in this case the right tool is a real advantage. You might find a good one used although they are not too expensive, and you could always try and sell it when you are done with your project. If you have never taped drywall I suggest asking for some initial help. Remember to go easy on the compound, use the right knives and expect to give it three passes with drying time in between coats. Haste does make waste if you rush this kind of job.

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    • #3
      Re: hanging drywall

      I've never used a drywall gun. I just use a regular drill and have no problem. The key is to get the screw head below the level of the drywall and not tear the paper. I assume the drywall gun does this for you. With a regular drill you just have to be careful; it's not too hard. I don't hang too much drywall, mainly just repair jobs.

      Maybe I'm not very good, or too much of a perfectionist, but I'll usually have 5 or 6 coats of compound. Try to keep using fresh compound, re-using what you take off will lead to 'bits' in the compound which will result in scores in the finished product or an uneven finish. I try to make each coat as smooth as possible to minimize the amount of sanding required at the end, using fresh compound helps to keep the finish smooth. The first time I ever used compound, I figured sanding would make everything OK ...... there was a ton of dust. Ever since then I have tried to get the finsh as good as possible with the compound to minimize sanding.

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      • #4
        Re: hanging drywall

        they make a special bit with kinda of a collar on it to use in a regular variable speed drill,

        my guess is any REAL 3/8 variable speed drill should do you for running dry wall screws,

        http://power-tools.hardwarestore.com...t-drywall.aspx

        as you can see by the URL there are a number of different qualities but there affordable IMO.

        ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

        (I had a old sears cordless and it would run dry wall screws 12 or 14 volt I do not remember, the charger keep burning up batteries and I replaced it with the dewalt 18 volt, there was no Ridgid (home depot) at the time and were near me),
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        Last edited by BHD; 04-20-2008, 12:28 AM.
        Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
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        PUBLIC NOTICE: Due to recent budget cuts, the rising cost of electricity, gas, and oil...plus the current state of the economy............the light at the end of the tunnel, has been turned off.

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        • #5
          Re: hanging drywall

          Sanding is inevitable and the previous tips on applying drywall compound make a lot of sense. Less dust is the best method because dust will get everywhere. Be sure to use a mask at the minimum and choose your clean-up process carefully because drywall dust will clog and overwhelm most vaccum cleaners. Special filters are available that can handle drywall dust. I have used wet sponging on small repairs to minimize dust. If you got a lot of dry wall to hang you may consider hiring someone to professionally prepare the walls for painting after you have hung them. Dry wall seams can be challenging/frustrating.

          The Ridgid 12V will do the job but I would consider the $69 Ridgid 18V Li-ion because it will have more than enough power for future DIY projects and is as light or lighter than the 12V drill NiCad.
          Last edited by reConx; 04-20-2008, 12:39 AM.

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          • #6
            Re: hanging drywall

            I've tried a wet sponge, and the first time I did it, I thought that was the end of sanding. I now find sponging to result in an uneven finish if you are not careful. Probably only something seen by the person doing the job than obvious in the finished product. I try to get the compound as smooth as possible when I apply it and a light swipe with sandpaper produces a better finish than a wet sponge

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            • #7
              Re: hanging drywall

              All very good advice, from my experience. I'll go along with not needing a specialized power tool, especially if this isn't your profession. I've used a regular 3/8 variable speed drill with little problem. It takes only a little bit to get the hang of it (pun not intended). Using one of the clutch-equipped drills is even better and certainly the specialized driver bit that was recommended should go a long way toward making it perfect. (I'll have to try one of those myself, thanks.) But regarding particular drills, even the little 12 volt lithium-ion drill/driver would probably do a nice job and with two batteries in the kit, it should give you plenty of power and time in use.

              While not a professional by any means, I've dry walled a few rooms over the years. Nasty job, doing the sanding. I usually wet sponge the first two fills and then smoothly apply the third and, all too often, the forth application which in lightly sanded with one of those sponge-type sanding block. To keep the dust contained, I use a plastic drop cloth hung close to the wall, and touching the floor. I find it easier to clean up that way.

              CWS

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              • #8
                Re: hanging drywall

                A number of years ago I had a drywall gun. I think it was a Black and Decker and is probably still lurking around here someplace. One day at HD I bought a used self-feed Hilty Drywall gun from the tool rental department and have never looked back. Fortunately I don't use it often but when I do I like it.

                To help with application of mud in the corners there is a tool with a short handle and mop like strings on the end. Dip the mop head into the mud bucket and run it along the corner seam. With just a little practice you should be able to slurp on 30-40" of mud in the corners with one swipe. At the very least a corner painting tool, one of those "V" shaped spongy things, will work and will be a good investment.

                When you mud the corners do one side at a time. Let it dry and do the other side. If you would like to know the real meaning of frustration try a corner tool. I can't use one now and never could although I have tried a number of times.

                Sanding will leave the best surface. The objective of the sanding is to match the texture of the mud to the texture of the drywall so there is a seamless transition. I remember I once lightly sponged some screw holes and went over it them with a trowel. They were very smooth, too smooth it turned out. When the wall was prined every screw hole was shiny. I should have sanded.

                As one of the previous posters said, "... go really easy with the mud." You will be far better off applying more coats than sanding off the dried mud.

                When dust containment isn't a problem, as in a flip house or total rehab, consider using an old electric pad sander with at most 220 grit sandpaper. It makes a lot of dust but you can sand almost as fast as you can move the sander along the wall.

                After your wall has been primed shine a light along the wall. Any inperfections will be glaringly obvious and you can fix whatever bumps or depressions you see.

                A lot of drywall imperfections can be hidden by lighting. If the ceiling is 'rough' make sure to use a fixture that shines light down, not one which shines up and reflects light off the ceiling down to the living area.

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                • #9
                  Re: hanging drywall

                  Originally posted by reconx View Post
                  Sanding is inevitable and the previous tips on applying drywall compound make a lot of sense. Less dust is the best method because dust will get everywhere. Be sure to use a mask at the minimum and choose your clean-up process carefully because drywall dust will clog and overwhelm most vaccum cleaners. Special filters are available that can handle drywall dust. I have used wet sponging on small repairs to minimize dust. If you got a lot of dry wall to hang you may consider hiring someone to professionally prepare the walls for painting after you have hung them. Dry wall seams can be challenging/frustrating.

                  The Ridgid 12V will do the job but I would consider the $69 Ridgid 18V Li-ion because it will have more than enough power for future DIY projects and is as light or lighter than the 12V drill NiCad.
                  I have never seen a $69.00 Ridgid 18v li-ion drill at home depot near me in Connecticut. Looking today at homedepot.com I see $187.00 18 volt drill but nothing else

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: hanging drywall

                    I have a drywall gun and a senco auto feed too. You may want to use an impact driver since it is faster than a drill and you can stop easily and useful for other jobs. A drill clutch , not so good since if you are not at depth you will have to change settings back and forth often. A drill with a brake is better with the clutch off.The auto feed is great for overhead and flooring with the extension and is easily removed from the gun.
                    I have a hand sander/screen with a vac attm. that I use a water bucket separator and Ridgid vac with a cleanstream filter. As said go easy on the mud to avoid a lot of sanding. I prefer the powder/water type with a fixed set time over the premix, much less shrinkage and can dry as fast as you want, most pros do not use premix mud.

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                    • #11
                      Re: hanging drywall

                      Don't get the mud too thick in inside corners or it will crack when the seasons change or if the house has the least bit of settlement. Also, don't break your sheets along side of a doorway or window. Easier to do, but better to notch out. Otherwise you end up with hairline from top corner of door to ceiling or from corner of window straight up/down.

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                      • #12
                        Re: hanging drywall



                        I couldn't find anywhere, where he asked for mudding tips, maybe I just read right past it.

                        As long as you create a larger dimple with the screw head, to allow more mud in that spot. Then it doesn't matter what power tool you use. If all you see is just the screw head dimple, well the mud could just pop right out of there, later on.

                        Also, you've been given good mudding advice, so your being taken care of, real well....
                        Great Link for a Construction Owner/Tradesmen, and just say Garager sent you....

                        http://www.contractorspub.com

                        A good climbing rope will last you 3 to 5 years, a bad climbing rope will last you a life time !!!

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                        • #13
                          Re: hanging drywall

                          Originally posted by garager View Post


                          I couldn't find anywhere, where he asked for mudding tips, maybe I just read right past it.

                          As long as you create a larger dimple with the screw head, to allow more mud in that spot. Then it doesn't matter what power tool you use. If all you see is just the screw head dimple, well the mud could just pop right out of there, later on.

                          Also, you've been given good mudding advice, so your being taken care of, real well....
                          What fun is an internet forum if you cannot stray from topic once in awhile?? Anyway, I would think a 12V driver should be plenty of power to hang drywall. Unless your house is studded with oak! I had a straight 3.6 power screwdriver that would bury a 1-5/8 drywall screw in a stud, and have hung drywall a long time ago (just a few sheets) with a cheap B&D 9.6 cordless drill. As long as you have 2 battery packs so you can switch out when one gets weak, you should be fine. I have put down a lot of subflooring with 2" screws with a cheapo ryobi 14.4 and never had a problem with it. I hung kitchen cabinets with 3" wood screws with the same drill. I think for the average Weekend Warrior type DIY'er anything in the 12-18V range will cover most household tasks without sweat. The 24-36V stuff is only necessary for pros.

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                          • #14
                            Re: hanging drywall

                            Originally posted by garager View Post


                            I couldn't find anywhere, where he asked for mudding tips, maybe I just read right past it.

                            As long as you create a larger dimple with the screw head, to allow more mud in that spot. Then it doesn't matter what power tool you use. If all you see is just the screw head dimple, well the mud could just pop right out of there, later on.

                            Also, you've been given good mudding advice, so your being taken care of, real well....
                            I'll take the blame for throwing in the advice on mud. I just thought if it was his first attempt at sheet rocking he might not know to go easy with the mud. I made that mistake many years ago and did not know any better until I had finished most of the job. I still cough up that joint compound.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: hanging drywall

                              Really some great advice regarding tool selection and drywall mudding tips. For me it would depend on the size of the job, number of people available, and whether roofs (lids) are involved. I have the Senco drywall gun and use it on every drywall job - large or small - and for scerwing down floor sheathing, etc. Makes`for a fast job especially when you're trying to hold full 5/8" sheets overhead. Hanging drywall is no fun and the faster it's up the better. Drywall gun and collated screws for the banana clip are more expensive, but it'll make brief work of any drywall job. There's a reason that the apprentice usually gets the job of screwing off drywall - it's tedious and no fun.

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