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  • Blue smoke on my 3300 psi p/w

    Bought the 3300 psi p/w yesterday and am pretty satisfied with the purchase. However, every once in a while is sounds like the engine starts to labor and blue smoke (oil?) starts to significantly stream from the exhaust. If I stop squeezing the trigger it stops and seems to be okay again for about another 3-5 minutes until it does it again. Just wondering if anyone else is experiencing this or what I should do if it continues. And yes I did add the oil that came with the unit.

  • #2
    Re: Blue smoke on my 3300 psi p/w

    I wouldn't even mess with it. It's not supposed to do that so I'd just take it back and exchange it for another.
    ================================================== ====
    All of us could take a lesson from the weather. It pays no attention to criticism.

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    • #3
      Re: Blue smoke on my 3300 psi p/w

      Only thing I can think of is that it may have too much oil in it, otherwise exchange it as suggested

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      • #4
        Re: Blue smoke on my 3300 psi p/w

        I just purchased a 3300 and I'm having the same smoke issue. Engine starts and runs fine and after a few minutes of washing the engine starts to labor and smoke pours out the muffler and the engine will stall unless I stop washing then the engine recovers fine.

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        • #5
          Re: Blue smoke on my 3300 psi p/w

          I don't have the problem, nor any quick fix, but interested in how it is resolved. Have you tried customer service. Please keep us informed with your progress. You can always return it to HD, if it is less then 90days from the purchase date for a full refund or exchange with the receipt.

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          • #6
            Re: Blue smoke on my 3300 psi p/w

            I fixed the problem. When I filled the unit with the oil supplied it was on an incline on my driveway and I used the 18oz as supplied and as directed in the manual. When I placed the unit on level ground and removed the dip stick, oil came out of the crankcase so I decided to let it flow until it stopped which then may it even with the bottom lip of where the dip stick is inserted. I then ran the unit with no smoke or other issues.

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            • #7
              Re: Blue smoke on my 3300 psi p/w

              The unit has a 20oz capacity, and should not have overflowed, when placed on level ground when you removed the dip stick.
              Did the oil get on the engine when it was an incline after removing the dip stick and caused the smoke? Maybe you can clarify!

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              • #8
                Re: Blue smoke on my 3300 psi p/w

                Let's be sure we have this straight. Is the blue smoke coming out of the engine exhaust or is it coming from somewhere around the pump?

                If it is coming from the engine, you need to change the oil. In all too many cases the included oil is KRAP grade. If this model has either a Subaru-Robin or Honda engine, you want a good brand of automotive engine oil. Please carefully read the owner's manual for the engine and not the pressure washer. It should tell you just how much oil the engine holds. Before adding any new oil, be sure to really drain out all the oil in the engine. With drain plug(s) removed, tilt the engine and be sure it is well drained out. Then replace and tighten the drain plug(s) and fill the engine using a good measuring cup to measure the oil. What most likely happened if this is a new engine, is that the oil foamed up and some got into the crankcase breather. If changing the oil and adding the correct amount, doesn't fix it, then please take it back and exchange the machine. I've run into this with portable generators which like pressure washers run the engines at high speed and hard when under load. Please do yourself a favor and do not use Quaker State oil. It is known to foam up in small high speed engines. If you can find it, get Castrol GTX or Mobil 5000 or Valvoline All-Climate 10W-30 (cool to mild weather) or #30 (hot summer) oil and again, use a good measuring cup. You can get a 1 cup, 8 Oz plastic measuring cup cheap at Walmart or a big grocery store. It really pays of to keep a few around with one in the garage and kept wiped out clean. Leave it upside down on a shelf to keep dirt and dust out of it.

                Briggs & Stratton has pre-measured bottles of small engine oil you can normally buy at ACE, Home Depot, Lowes and such stores. I've seen it in 20 Oz. bottles and using it would give you the right amount and type of oil. Please do not buy house brand or no-name oil.

                This model uses a Subaru-Robin model EX 21 engine. It holds 20 Ounces of oil. For summer use a heavy duty #30 oil that meets API class SM/SL specs. In the cooler weather, use 10W-30 oil that meets API class SM/SL specs. Note: Please use a good quality conventional oil and not synthetic oil.

                While not in the manual, I strongly recommend changing the oil after the first 4-5 hours, and then again after about 20-25 hours. Then change it every 50 hours max. It's better to change oil every 25 hours than to let it go too long. Oil is cheap compared to rebuilding an engine.

                Is this blue-white smoke or more black color smoke coming out the engine exhaust?

                One thing to note is that if you can adjust the engine speed easy, back it down some from max. Normally about 3/4 of max is all you need and it saves on wear and tear along with giving you less noise. A small engine running too fast (setting messed up) will cause oil foaming and smoke. This is bad news and grounds for taking it back. I would first change the oil and do measure it carefully.
                Last edited by Woussko; 06-22-2008, 01:26 AM.

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                • #9
                  Re: Blue smoke on my 3300 psi p/w

                  If anyone needs the manual for the Subaru-Robin engine on this pressure washer, you can download it here.
                  EX21 engine: http://www.robinamerica.com/media/ma...8551584055.pdf

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                  • #10
                    Re: Blue smoke on my 3300 psi p/w

                    I actually like using Chevron Delo 15-w40, if non synthetic or a 50:50 mix of the synthetic if you want a better performance. Diesel engine oil is formulated to be anti foam and works best at lower rpms like in a small engine tool. I also do the same with my air compressors. I have no foaming at all in my 2 stage DeVilbiss 6.5hp 80 gal A/C thru the sight glass with this mix and have no seal issues as can happen with pure synthetic.
                    I used the Toro supplied 30w in my Toro mower and got blue smoke on inclines even though the level is correct, I checked the dip stick and measures the 20 oz. too, I drained it hot over night before the refill even. Prior I had Chevron 10w-30[good price in the Club stores $20/case and has ISO SYN additive too] as break-in oil with no issues. I do not know what oil it really is from Toro, maybe Quaker State [paraffin based = foam and sludge]which I avoid at all costs too, but I am going to change it soon.
                    Check you plug for deposits.
                    I set my PW's using a liquid filled pressure gauge for RPM and pressure[unloader setting] running with a Tach too. Most are 3600 rpm max., and as said best to be below that but I run my Honda's at max rpm with no issues for many years. There is a sweet spot in the combo. CAT techs say that they set the pump to spec BUT they do not mate them to the engine , nozzle[ will wear over time and enlarge which reduces the pressure output like airless paint sprayers], wand, hose etc..and the settings need to be adjusted by the manuf. which I find to hit or miss to the ideal and it will change over time anyway.
                    Premium gas is best to prevent problems as these CARB engines run really lean and can burn the valves if you over rev the engine. I know a great small engine tech and he always tells me that at all the clinics, Honda,Echo, B&S.. they say use a major brand gas and use premium.
                    I also like the the E1 plugs too.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Andrew

                      I'm not so sure what Subaru-Robin would have to say about using a good 15W-40 Diesel Engine oil in a new air cooled gasoline engine. I can say that Chevron Delo 15W-40 runs great in slower speed liquid cooled Diesel and Gasoline engines. I've used it in older V8 car engines with great results and also in Wisconsin cast iron block air cooled gasoline engines. What really would be great for helping prevent oil foaming would be to try to find #30 heavy duty racing engine oil. That is made for high speeds and lots of whipping. Where I see problems is using 5W-30 or even 10W-30 oil in the summer with a hot running air cooled engine. It really does get pretty thin as air cooled engines (most anyway) do run with a higher crankcase temp than a well designed liquid cooled engine.

                      The engine manual states to use 10W-30 oil other than in the summer where they recommend a straight #30 heavy duty oil.

                      After the engine is fully broke in and out of warranty, I see no problem using a good 15W-40 oil, but when new it may be best to use what they call for. The engine does need to be run pretty close to level too. If you must tilt it a bit, have the exhaust side up rather than down.

                      Update: Kendall has GT-1 High Performance engine oil in #30, 40, 50 and special use #70 along with 10W-40 and 20W-50
                      Castrol has HD30 and HD40, Valvoline VR1 (racing oil) comes in both multi weight and in straight 30, 40, 50 and 60

                      With these being new engines, I recommend using a straight #30 heavy duty oil for now. If the engine still has a smoking problem, then return the pressure washer for another. As for gasoline, many small engine manufactures recommend using 89-91 octane plus grade now rather than regular 87. STIHL and ECHO really blast off to their dealers about this for their 50:1 fuel mix 2 cycle engines and only to use their oil. Even in my car which used to run fine on regular 87, I do find either adding a little super 93 or running it on plus 89 in the summer helps and especially on long hard hills. I really doubt most gasoline is up to the standards it was a few years ago.
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                      Please note that a large rental yard in my are just purchased a good many Subaru-Robin brand portable generators with various engines on them. I'm going to try to contact the branch manager and ask about blue smoking problems. Also, I'll try to find out what exact oil(s) they use and what results each has given them. Oil foaming is a major issue with small engines as most use a splash - splatter system. This means there is lots of whipping of the oil and anti-foam additives in the oil are a must.
                      Last edited by Woussko; 06-22-2008, 06:07 PM.

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                      • #12
                        Re: Blue smoke on my 3300 psi p/w

                        It says in the manual that the unit already comes with roughly 2 ounces of oil in it. They do that so they can fire it up at the factory for a brief period. When I filled mine, it didn't take the enitire 18oz. bottle to fill it. Guessing by the amount I had left in the bottle after I filled it, I would say there was about 3 or 4 ounces already in the engine.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Blue smoke on my 3300 psi p/w

                          Originally posted by Woussko View Post
                          Let's be sure we have this straight. Is the blue smoke coming out of the engine exhaust or is it coming from somewhere around the pump?

                          If it is coming from the engine, you need to change the oil. In all too many cases the included oil is KRAP grade. If this model has either a Subaru-Robin or Honda engine, you want a good brand of automotive engine oil. Please carefully read the owner's manual for the engine and not the pressure washer. It should tell you just how much oil the engine holds. Before adding any new oil, be sure to really drain out all the oil in the engine. With drain plug(s) removed, tilt the engine and be sure it is well drained out. Then replace and tighten the drain plug(s) and fill the engine using a good measuring cup to measure the oil. What most likely happened if this is a new engine, is that the oil foamed up and some got into the crankcase breather. If changing the oil and adding the correct amount, doesn't fix it, then please take it back and exchange the machine. I've run into this with portable generators which like pressure washers run the engines at high speed and hard when under load. Please do yourself a favor and do not use Quaker State oil. It is known to foam up in small high speed engines. If you can find it, get Castrol GTX or Mobil 5000 or Valvoline All-Climate 10W-30 (cool to mild weather) or #30 (hot summer) oil and again, use a good measuring cup. You can get a 1 cup, 8 Oz plastic measuring cup cheap at Walmart or a big grocery store. It really pays of to keep a few around with one in the garage and kept wiped out clean. Leave it upside down on a shelf to keep dirt and dust out of it.

                          Briggs & Stratton has pre-measured bottles of small engine oil you can normally buy at ACE, Home Depot, Lowes and such stores. I've seen it in 20 Oz. bottles and using it would give you the right amount and type of oil. Please do not buy house brand or no-name oil.

                          This model uses a Subaru-Robin model EX 21 engine. It holds 20 Ounces of oil. For summer use a heavy duty #30 oil that meets API class SM/SL specs. In the cooler weather, use 10W-30 oil that meets API class SM/SL specs. Note: Please use a good quality conventional oil and not synthetic oil.

                          While not in the manual, I strongly recommend changing the oil after the first 4-5 hours, and then again after about 20-25 hours. Then change it every 50 hours max. It's better to change oil every 25 hours than to let it go too long. Oil is cheap compared to rebuilding an engine.

                          Is this blue-white smoke or more black color smoke coming out the engine exhaust?

                          One thing to note is that if you can adjust the engine speed easy, back it down some from max. Normally about 3/4 of max is all you need and it saves on wear and tear along with giving you less noise. A small engine running too fast (setting messed up) will cause oil foaming and smoke. This is bad news and grounds for taking it back. I would first change the oil and do measure it carefully.
                          Go Woussko, it's your birthday! Go Woussko! It's your birthday! Whoop, whoop!!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Blue smoke on my 3300 psi p/w

                            My preference for these types of engines (high torque and load, high rpm, small, 4-stroke engines) is the Castrol HD30 oil. You just can't beat a good 30-weight oil in these engines. I use this oil in my 4-stroke Cub Cadet trimmer and lawn mower. And like Woussko said, change the oil every 25 hours (or yearly, whichever comes first).

                            To me, from all points listed here, it almost sounds like too much oil being put in. Once the engine is under heavy load, and the oil pressure is creeping up, some overpressure oil is getting into the crankcase and causing an issue. Sounds just like too much oil. Try draining and replacing with good oil, keeping an eye on the fluid amount (as well as the dip stick's "full" line), and try again. If that doesn't help, worst off, it could be a scoured piston ring - return for exchange if the oil drain/change thing doesn't work.

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                            • #15
                              Re: Blue smoke on my 3300 psi p/w

                              Sorry but my birthday is in September. I did really howl far too much in that post however. Time for more of my "Hush Hound" dog food, I guess.
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                              I called up the rental yard and the service manager said they do a 5 hour breaking in of all new Subaru Robin engines there before they will allow one to be rented. They use 10W-30 Valvoline All Climate regular oil in them for this. The engines are run under no load and just fast enough so they are smooth for about 30 minutes. Next they are run at about 2400 RPM for one hour, 2800 RPM for one hour and finally at 3600 RPM and under a pretty heavy load. There is some blue smoke in the exhaust until the piston rings properly seat to the cylinder walls. After 5 hours of running they give them a good hot drain and said that loads of **** comes out in the break-in oil. Next they are carefully filled with #30 Valvoline Heavy Duty oil and setup for use.

                              With a pressure washer, you would leave off the pressure hose and connect the garden hose to supply water. Turn it on part way so there is water flowing through the pump. You'll need to look at the engine manual to see how to set the running speed. Normally it's pretty easy to adjust it.

                              One thing that comes to mind here is that these engines red line at 4000 rather than 3600 RPM and someone may have set them up to a very high speed. This is where it would be wise to have a small engine tech check and set the speed to about 3200 RPM which is fast enough. You'll get longer engine and pump life over running it at 3600 RPM and many pumps aren't designed for over 3200 RPM anyway. Too fast = splasher on connecting rod really whips up the oil making it foam.

                              While the above breaking in of the engine may seem like a pain, I can assure you that it will pay off with longer engine life and an engine that runs far better than to just work it hard when brand new.

                              WARNING: Never run a pressure washer pump dry. It must have some water flowing through it at all times other than for a few seconds when you release the trigger. If you need to move the machine, stop the engine or have someone hold the trigger open and aim the nozzle into open air.

                              I really wish that small engine manufactures would do full break-in at the factory but I guess that's asking too much from them. The same for automotive engines would be nice. I do know on large Diesel engine generators that it's normal for dealers to come out after installation and give them a full day break-in with a 4 hours at rated load test ending this. They normally change the oil and filter(s) too. Lots of break-in grit comes out.

                              I remember when I got my 2004 Subaru Outback that at 1000 miles of easy driving, I changed the oil and filter myself. What came out in the oil made me shake in fear of what would have happened had I just run it to the normal 3750 mile first oil change time as per the owner's manual. Oh was I glad to get that glop and grit out of my new engine. I normally do pretty frequent oil and filter changes. Contamination needs to be gone.
                              Last edited by Woussko; 06-24-2008, 09:50 AM.

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