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  • Flood waters

    I resently experinced all my tools being submerged in flood water here in the midwest..does anyone have any suggestions on how to save any of them..I would just hate to have to replace all my power tools, since none of them are covered under flood insurance. Any help would be on this would be apperciated.


    Bob

  • #2
    Re: Flood waters

    Originally posted by woodsman View Post
    I resently experinced all my tools being submerged in flood water here in the midwest..does anyone have any suggestions on how to save any of them..I would just hate to have to replace all my power tools, since none of them are covered under flood insurance. Any help would be on this would be apperciated.


    Bob
    Bob......I would take them to a electric motor repair facility and ask them what should be done. Hopefully spraying them with electric motor cleaning solvent will work without having to completely disassemble each tool. Many years ago I was with National Cash Register and that is what we did to cash register electric motors that had been submerged in flood waters.
    If they are overloaded with work I would take them to an auto repair shop and spray parts solvent into the motor and clutch area, blow it out with compressed air and try running each of them for a period of time. Do this ASAP before they set up with rust.
    Good luck....Ray
    Last edited by roadrashray; 07-02-2008, 03:55 PM.

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    • #3
      Re: Flood waters

      I am truly sorry to here of your plight. I will relay what we used to do for submerged outboard motors (ones that fell off boat or boat sunk).

      First, keep submerged in clean water until you decide to clean them. This will keep more oxygen away and reduce corrosion, as well as loosen any mud. etc residue from the flood water.
      When you are able to get started at recovering: flush with clean water to remove as much crud as possible. Drain any fuel tanks and oil pans, gear boxes, etc, and flush with kerosene or diesel fuel. (You can use denatured alcohol in the gas tanks to get out water, etc. Anything left will mix with new gas). Blow out as much water as possible and refill tanks, oil pans, etc. You may have to drain and refill after initial startup to get all the water/crud out, so use cheaper grade oil for first fill.
      Blow out any electrical components and let thoroughly dry. Replace any batteries that are not sealed.. Disassemble as much as practical to get the guts as clean as possible.

      For piston engines, pull the spark plugs, spin to get out as much water as possible, pour in some transmission fluid or hydraulic fluid and run the piston up and down until it seems to move freely. Drain out the excess and reinstall plugs after they are cleaned. They will smoke at first on start-up, but it will help free up any gunk form the water and stop any further corrosion.

      Time is your enemy here, as more time means more corrosion damage to precision parts. Start with the most critical, or easiest to do, and work your way through them.

      Basically, you want to preserve them until you can clean them, free up any moving parts and get them relubricated, and dry out the elctrical and make sure the connections/commutators/brushes are all clean and dry.

      I do not envy you the task, but wish wou good luck in recovering as much as possible.

      Go
      Practicing at practical wood working

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      • #4
        Re: Flood waters

        I thank you all for your suggestions will try to salvage what I can

        thanks again for all your help

        Bob

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        • #5
          Re: Flood waters

          Sorry to hear you got flooded, Woodsman.

          A couple tips on cleaning up flooded electronics:
          -Keep them submerged in clean water until ready to clean.
          -Remove from water and immediately submerge into rubbing alcohol
          -make sure the alcohol gets into all areas (swish around in the alcohol bath to insure good coverage).
          -remove from alcohol bath and allow the alcohol to evaporate. The alcohol will carry water molecules away with it as it evaporates.

          If the circuit boards are covered in mud, agitate in clean water to remove as much as possible. DO NOT attempt to scrub with anything. If necessary, a dental pick or toothbrush can be used to gently remove contaminants.

          Once the circuit is clean and dry, replace into unit and energize. If the unit does not work as normal, turn off/remove power and repeat the alcohol bath process.

          Apparently, your computer is working (yay!!), so you may or may not need those instructions. Mostly, you can recover a flooded PC. You'll have to replace any CD/DVD and floppy drives usually. The hard drive is sealed well enough that dirt and grit can't get in. It's important to put the drives into the alcohol bath to make sure the very fine particles carried in flood waters are cleaned off. You should try not to scrub the gunk off a drive though because in doing so you could force particles through the fine filter. If grit manages to get inside the drive case, your drive will fail. It only takes a very tiny particle to ruin a hard drive.

          A friend of mine says you can use WD40 spray to clean up inside of sealed motors, to replace the water. I hope it works!!

          Good luck, Woodsman! I hope your tools recover. Lots of work, and I sure don't envy you the task. If that's the worst of your damages though, I guess you did ok.
          I put it all back together better than before. There\'s lots of leftover parts.

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          • #6
            Re: Flood waters

            VASandy thats not all I lost in the flood..had 7ft of water in first floor of house and lost everythingin basement.but I will survive and thanks again for your suggestions

            Bob

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