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  • #16
    Re: reason

    Originally posted by levon View Post
    when i do pick up the saw at home depot, im going to try to pickup at least one good blade, what do you reccommend? i know they have frued at hd, but not sure which to start with?
    I'm still using the original blade, but when I do get a new one I plan on getting task specific blades (e.g, I want a ripping blade).

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    • #17
      Re: reason

      Originally posted by levon View Post
      badger dave:
      how many sizes metric wrenches do you need besides the 12mm?
      The manual says you need 10, 11, 12,13,14 and 17 but I think I only used 10, 12 and 13. The other ones are perhaps for adjustments that I didn't have to do.

      The blade that comes with the saw isn't anywhere near top of the line, but it gives surprisingly smooth cuts.
      Last edited by darius; 07-25-2008, 03:31 PM.
      In order to understand recursion, one must first understand recursion.

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      • #18
        Re: reason

        Originally posted by levon View Post
        when i do pick up the saw at home depot, im going to try to pickup at least one good blade, what do you reccommend? i know they have frued at hd, but not sure which to start with?
        First off, I wouldn't buy any blade that HD sells with the exception of the Freud dado set. The blades HD sells are more geared toward the construction industry so if fine woodworking is what you intend to do than I'd look elsewhere for my blades.

        Ideally you're best off to have blades that are job specific such as a dedicated rip blade and another for crosscutting. Then of course you need another for ripping thick stock and one for use with plywood. If changing blades all the time isn't your cup of tea and you don't want to spend a small fortune right away on blades then you should consider a good quality combination or general purpose blade. These blades will do a very good job at both ripping and crosscutting but not an excellent job.

        A few suggestions would be;

        Combination Blades
        Freud LU84R011
        Freud LU84M011
        Freud LU83R010

        General Purpose Blades
        Freud P410
        Freud LU72M010
        Freud LU84R010
        Forrest Woodworker II
        Ridge Carbide TS2000
        Last edited by BadgerDave; 07-26-2008, 08:22 AM.
        ================================================== ====
        ~~Don't worry about old age; it doesn't last that long.

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        • #19
          Re: reason

          BadgerDave, you've been exceptionally courteous in the hundreds of posts I've read.

          levon, you can get a "better" deal on the saw if you simply request a moving coupon from Home Depot.
          It takes a few weeks to receive the coupon, but you'll get one. Register here: http://www.homedepotmoving.com/movin...article=&step=

          Using that, it's about $55 off the price of the saw. Not huge, but it's still a few peanuts.

          Regarding blades: There are few things you can upgrade on your saw that you will get such return on your investment as a good blade(s). For a mid to top tier blade (Ridge, WWII, etc) you will get years of use out of them and will save money over buying 2-3 contstruction grade blades in that time. The only caution is to not nick the blades with something foolish (like a nail in the wood).

          I personally have settled on the Ridge TS2000 as my blade for 95% of my woodworking. Cuts are smooth as butter, chews through anything, absolutely no runout, and only cost $90. And it can be sharpened a number of times (the carbide thickness is unbelievable!)
          Earlier this year I bought a WWI-30T ripping blade, specifically for ripping 1 "+ thick hardwoods (walnut, white oak, Brazilian cherry) and have been very happy with it. Again, somewhere around $80. These are the only two blades I put on my saw. I craigslisted the stock blade for as well as the other blades I tried for $5 each, hehe.

          You should get a combo blade first, as you *can* rip with them quite well. Just have to get the feed rate just right in thick stock so you don't burn, or bog down.

          Lastly, regarding Home Depot's decision to no longer display stationary tools... This must be a LOCAL store decision, because both of the Home Depots in Madison still have machines setup and on display. It is a smaller 'tool corral' than before, but they have the full Ridgid lineup as well as a few others. So, don't write to HD corporate. Write to your local store, attention to the General Manager and tell them they lost a sale and you took your business elsewhere.

          Honestly, though, having read this forum for the last two years I would feel comfortable biting the bullet and getting Ridgid just based on the discourse, discussion, complaints, and user-comments.... IF, I didn't already own most of them. ;-) The table saw is the exception. Given the investment, size, and its "heart of the workshop" role, I would not have bought it if I hadn't seen it in person, and been impressed in nearly every way (and got 10% off).
          Remember HD has a 30 day no-questions-asked return policy. While inconvenient, IF you do hate the jointer, for example, you *can* return it for a refund.

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          • #20
            Re: reason

            Originally posted by Wood_Junkie View Post

            Lastly, regarding Home Depot's decision to no longer display stationary tools... This must be a LOCAL store decision, because both of the Home Depots in Madison still have machines setup and on display. It is a smaller 'tool corral' than before, but they have the full Ridgid lineup as well as a few others. So, don't write to HD corporate. Write to your local store, attention to the General Manager and tell them they lost a sale and you took your business elsewhere.
            See that they read my email!

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