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  • Help with an old circular saw blade

    I have a very old Wen Stallion 960 circular saw I inherited from my father-inlaw. Any way many years ago I bought a new blade an installed and it has worked well enough but I need to change the blade now and I cannot get the old one off.

    I can keep the blade from turning by putting a screwdriver in the blade hole but when I turn the nut the motor turns with it. I am sure I need to turn it clockwise (reverse threads) but there is no way for me to stop the shaft from turning. I cannot find any kind of button or lever that could help.

    Any one have experience on something like this or advice on things to try? It could be an excuse to get a new saw but I just got a new table saw so that will probably not happen. Besides I could not look myself in the mirror if I got a new saw just because I could not get the old blade off

    Any advice is appreciated.

  • #2
    Re: Help with an old circular saw blade

    Looking at your saw from the front of it is the motor to the left or the right of the blade?

    I bet an impact wrench with proper socket would loosen the nut fast but you must be 10000000000000% sure of which direction to turn the nut first.

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    • #3
      Re: Help with an old circular saw blade

      Roy,
      On the older circ. saws, you aren't going to find anything like a blade lock to help you change that out. Those are relatively new additions. I was going to post and tell you that the nut would tighten by going the same direction as the saw blade when running, but when I checked my DeWalt, it was just the opposite -- loosen it by going in the direction of blade travel, go figure.
      First thing you want to do is spray that nut down really well with Kroil. In the absence of Kroil, some PB Blaster, or LIquie Wrench. WD-40, but that's my last choice on ventures like that. Let it sit a day to really work itself in.
      After that, use a chuck of 2x4, or some other piece of relatively soft wood to wedge in between the blade housing and the blade itself. You want the blade to be biting into the wood when you try to wrench it off. It might be either rotation. Put a wrench on it, preferably a box wrench, and give it a light tap in the direction you think it should loosen. If it doesn't give, try the other direction. It's going to be kind of a try it and feel it proposition until you can figure out which way. If you can see any threads at the end of the arbor, you should be able to determine the direction by looking closely.
      Good luck and let us know how you come out. You might also hit it with a little heat from a propane torch, but be careful there so you don't heat it too much. A heat gun might be a better bet.
      Jim Don

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      • #4
        Re: Help with an old circular saw blade

        I had to try this to make sure. With all of my circular saws and my compound miter saw using the block of wood to jam the blade you'll find that the teeth will dig into the wood when tightening and will repel from the wood when loosening the blade bolt or nut. Normally you have right hand threads but not always. Let's think of a miter saw. If the motor was on the left side looking at it from the operator's normal position then I can see the need for left hand threads. Jim's idea of a good fitting offset box wrench is a real mush have tool for this. You jam the blade and tap the wrench handle with another block. I've used the edge of my wood top bench for helping with this. It left and notch in the bench top, but oh well. I have a little junker bench for this kind of stuff. No way would I want to dig up the top on my good bench. You could clamp a scrap of 2 x 8 to your bench.

        If it was my saw I would use my impact wrench and take it easy. As for Kroil, PB Blaster, etc. that's a great thing to use and do allow time for it to soak in.

        Remember to think safety and take your time. Lots of little taps do far less harm than a heavy strike blow.

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        • #5
          Re: Help with an old circular saw blade

          Grunter and JimDon,
          Thanks for the tips. I did spray it with some WD-40 and let it sit most of the day. I probably did not explain very well but the blade is not turning just the bolt and the shaft. There is a hole in the blade for a drill bit or screwdriver and when I use that the blade does not turn. However the bolt turns and turns is either direction but is is turning the whole shaft and motor. It is really wierd.

          I have the saw clamped to the workbench and I can hold the blade steady and grab the washer on the bolt with some visegrips but the bolt still just turns the motor. Either direction turns just as easily.

          I am guessing the bolt is seized up on the shaft but there is no way to put a wrench on the shaft. I could try a little heat tomorrow. Also maybe a quick shot with the impact wrench would break it loose but now you have me wondering which way the bolt actually turns. I was sure it was lefty tighty, righty loosey on the saw.

          I appreciate the thoughts and will get after it again in the morning.

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          • #6
            Re: Help with an old circular saw blade

            Originally posted by Old Grunter View Post
            Looking at your saw from the front of it is the motor to the left or the right of the blade?

            I bet an impact wrench with proper socket would loosen the nut fast but you must be 10000000000000% sure of which direction to turn the nut first.
            Forgot to answer this one. The motor is on the right if I am facing the saw. When I use it from behind it is on the left.

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            • #7
              Re: Help with an old circular saw blade

              Roy, im no expert, but i agree with Grunter, the impact of the impact wrench may loosen the bolt without even having to lock or chock the blade.

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              • #8
                Re: Help with an old circular saw blade

                This reminds me of an older B & D circular saw and the major (just don't try it goof) I made of installing a thin kerf blade on it. The screw was too long and bottomed out in the shaft hole. The blade could be turned by hand on the shaft while a wrench was holding the screw head.

                From what you say, I really think about the only way you'll have any luck is to use a proper size 6 point impact socket and impact wrench. Let inertia become your friend. Do not pull the trigger way back and really hammer or more than likely you'll bust up gear teeth. If that happens and being an older saw into the trash it shall soon go.

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                • #9
                  Re: Help with an old circular saw blade

                  If you have a Sears or some other place with a pretty good hand tool selection get yourself a double box end, offset handle wrench. Normally you would need one end to be 9/16" to work with a circular saw but be sure before you go and get one. The other end will normally be either 1/2" or 5/8" depending on wrench. Put this on the blade screw head or nut and while holding the blade as best you can, give the wrench a few pretty good smacks with a block of wood. Assume that it has right hand threads. If it doesn't loosen, then smack in the other direction. Most hand held circular saws other than worn drive are made so the motor is on your left from the operating position and they should have right hand threads. That means CCW to loosen and CW to tighten.

                  The first picture is a motor left, blade right saw. The second is motor right, blade left saw. Most if not all worn drive models are like the second one only the motor runs parallel to the blade. If your's is like the first one (most are), you need to turn the screw or nut so that the teeth would dig into piece of wood if you were actually trying to cut it when you want to loosen the screw or nut. I hope that helps. If it's like the second one, then you may very well have left hand threads and things will seem backwards. I need to figure some things out but when you pull the trigger the screw or nut needs to self tighten.

                  If you have or have access to a good 1/2" square drive impact wrench and sockets then forget the part about the double box end wrench.

                  WARNING: Never even dream of using hand sockets on an impact wrench. They can and do shatter with great force.
                  Attached Files
                  Last edited by Old Grunter; 08-10-2008, 07:28 PM. Reason: Typos

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                  • #10
                    Re: Help with an old circular saw blade

                    Any chance there is some space behind the blade where you could grab the shaft?

                    The heat idea may help but be careful of the shaft bearing, too much heat (flame or heat gun doesn't matter) may ruin the seals.

                    Except for the sentimental value it's probably better in the long run to get a new saw; safer, better ergonomics, more power, etc.

                    RIDGID, Milwaukee, Porter Cable are good makes. There are others of course as I am sure everyone here will be happy to point out their favorite.
                    "When we build let us think we build forever. Let it not be for present delight nor for present use alone. Let it be such work that our descendants will thank us for, and let us think, as we lay stone upon stone, that a time is to come when these stones will be held sacred because our hands have touched them, and that men will say, as they look upon the labor and wrought substance of them, "See! This our fathers did for us."
                    John Ruskin (1819 - 1900)

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Help with an old circular saw blade

                      Roy,
                      If the nut is seized on the shaft and nothing will get it loose, there is one more thing to try here. Take a Dremel with one of the reinforced cut-off blades. Make a couple of cuts on opposite sides of the nut. You'll have to go slowly and carefully with this so you don't screw up the threads. When you get close to the threads and the shaft, all you have to do is hit it lightly with a small cold chisel and a hammer and it'll come apart and fall off the shaft. Don't forget the safety glasses when you do this though.
                      Jim Don

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                      • #12
                        Re: Help with an old circular saw blade

                        Originally posted by Bob D. View Post
                        Any chance there is some space behind the blade where you could grab the shaft?

                        The heat idea may help but be careful of the shaft bearing, too much heat (flame or heat gun doesn't matter) may ruin the seals.

                        Except for the sentimental value it's probably better in the long run to get a new saw; safer, better ergonomics, more power, etc.

                        RIDGID, Milwaukee, Porter Cable are good makes. There are others of course as I am sure everyone here will be happy to point out their favorite.
                        There is no way to grab the motor shaft but I managed to finally get the bolt out. Turns out it is standard threads but that was not the real problem since the shaft just spins with the bolt.

                        I was able to grab the middle washer that is about 1/16" with some visegrips and with the blade locked down then use a box end wrench all a the same time. What a mess.

                        There are 3 washers on the outside of the blade. The first one has 2 flat sides and is a slotted washer for the shaft. Next there is a big fender washer that covers up the flat spots on the first one or else I could have grabbed the flat spots. Last there is a small washer on the bolt itself.

                        I am going to get a slightly smaller fender washer so I can grab the flat spots next time and start saving up for a new saw . This one got me by for a long time.

                        Thanks for the help and suggestions from everyone!
                        Last edited by RoyBullets; 08-10-2008, 11:42 AM.

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                        • #13
                          Re: Help with an old circular saw blade

                          I'm glad you finally got it apart. I have a gut feeling someone replaced the blade screw with one slightly too long. Normally you have the blade flange (cupped and slotted washer) and the blade screw.

                          I had to check this to be sure. On a circular saw where it's "Blade Right" like the first picture the blade screw needs to be right hand threads. On a "Blade Left" like in the second and third pictures (see post #9) it needs to be left hand threads. If done backwards the screw would tend to loosen every time the saw is started.

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                          • #14
                            Re: Help with an old circular saw blade

                            Originally posted by Old Grunter View Post
                            I had to check this to be sure. On a circular saw where it's "Blade Right" like the first picture the blade screw needs to be right hand threads. On a "Blade Left" like in the second and third pictures (see post #9) it needs to be left hand threads. If done backwards the screw would tend to loosen every time the saw is started.
                            I guess I had it backwards in my mind. I checked back and I put that blade on almost 20 years ago . Until recently I probably used it once a year brieftly.

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