Announcement

Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.

High Air compressor pressure

Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • High Air compressor pressure

    How high are we going tro go w/ Air Compressor pressure??? My Porter Cable twin tank is rated at 150 psi now I see some DeWalts at 200psi. When a tank rusts and fails how safe is a 200psi??? 200 psi is alot compared to the older 125psi compressors!!! I hope the tanks are sturdier!!!

  • #2
    Re: High Air compressor pressure

    My longer reply post was removed by me. I hope only I saw it here.

    This made me throw another temper fit. To see what Black & Decker / Dewalt did to EMGLO makes me puke, poop and bay howl.
    Last edited by Old Grunter; 08-09-2008, 10:59 PM.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: High Air compressor pressure

      I saw a "deconstruction " TV program on DIY and the dropped an air tank off a 6 story building into a bed of nails, did not explode just let the air out. They tried all typed of destructive things and nothing really happened.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: High Air compressor pressure

        I wouldn't be too worried about it. 150psi is still relatively low and the tanks should be able to withstand much higer than that. A well built tank will just vent all its air if it ruptures rather than explode. Scuba and paintball tanks are filled from 3000 to 4500 psi and are made from softer and lighter materials. People don't mind strapping them on to their body.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: High Air compressor pressure

          "People don't mind strapping them on to their body."

          Perhaps that's because they don't have a clue as to what will happen if one of those tanks ruptures. I would be surprised if you'd live to tell about it, even if you were a close-proximity witness.

          However, I can find no reports of paintball tank injury! Perhaps that is because the danger has been recognized and the tanks are well designed for the rigors of paintballing and the nature of the supporting industry.

          As I understand it, paintball tanks are designed with "rupture plugs" which will vent the pressure if weakened. Tanks also get inspected at each refill as mandated by law and must be hydrotested and certified periodically. In most cases, these tanks are filled with CO2 or Nitrogen which is basically dry and there's little to no chance of internal corrosion.

          In the case of air compressor tanks, they are much larger in volume and, in most cases, made of steel which is subject to corrosion. The compressed air is most always "wet", and the resulting condensation will, over time, cause corrosion. Unlike paintball tanks, the only hydro-burst test they receive is at the point of manufacture. (Does your tank have an ASME stamp?)

          Likewise, a compressor tank will be filled many times during an operating period and it may not be drained as often as it should be. The resulting condensate build-up will corrode the tank, unlike dry CO2 or Nitrogen. In most cases this corrosion may eventually result in leakage, but the risk of "rupture" is very real and even with a 100 lbs of pressure you don't want to be in the same room if that happens.

          I worked for a compressor manufacturer for 30 years and such events are rare. In industrial applications most injuries are caused by human error during maintenance (like pulling a valve cover on a pressurized cylinder). But, these industrial units get periodic inspections, which includes vessel inspection.

          Small garage-type applications are more like our home shops; and I do recall a case where a garage-type compressor tank ruptured and took out part of a wall and serious damaged the entire station. This was decades ago, but the amount of damage was very much like a gas explosion, without the fire. That particular compressor was quite similar to the 30 to 80 gallon tanks many of us use in our shops, but was only in the 100 - 125 psi range, unlike the every increasing pressures that we see today.

          Although I can't speak for current manufacturing trends, during the 70's through 90's most single and 2-stage, recip-type industrial compressors were in the 100 to 125 psi range for use with air tools, paint spray, and similar applications. There were designed to easily handle the extremely large volume requirements of "factory air".

          CWS

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: High Air compressor pressure

            I wonder why they would want higher pressure. Most air tools are engineered for 90 PSI at the tool inlet. Might this be for special nailers? As for air receivers exploding, look back to when they were riveted rather than welded. A good many of them really went KABOOM blasting walls out and roofs off buildings. The reason we don't hear or read about such today is that you need to go way back. As CWS stated even a little 12 gallon receiver with 100 PSI inside will really make a big KABOOM if it did rupture. Manufactures and engineers work hard to make safe products, but with more and more imports and the all mighty $$$ factor, many home use machines are disasters waiting to happen. Let's see what happens when these new high pressure little tanks get 5 years on them. Sometime take a good look at a heavy spun steel CO2 or Nitrogen tank. The wall thickness is impressive. There is no way a product made over seas to sell for little $$$ (What manufacture gets) can be made to any serious standards.

            As for ASME plates on the air receivers, check ALL the info on them. Many are not NB (national board listed) and most have both lower working pressure and temperature ratings than what is used as standard for a true industrial-commercial model. Look at the pure CRAP grade so called ASME safety relief valves on the home user junk machines. NO way are they real ASME valves. NO WAY ... If you want to see what a real one is like, look below. Only one is the real thing. The others are not really ASME anything. They just look like little copies. One of the valves in the pictures is adjustable. Crank it down and nothing happens with over pressure until KABOOM and you are dead meat.

            Does your air compressor receiver have a safety relief valve like these? Mine do and I will not allow less. Does your air receiver have a plate on it giving all the specs, when it was made, by what company and where they are located? Does it have the N.B. emblem on it? There are big differences between real ones and fake imported crap. There are some made here that are faked too. Enforcement is the problem. It's one thing to claim something is built to given specs and another to actually do it.

            Only the picture with the grayish background on the right is the real thing A.S.M.E. relief valve. The one on the left is a faker and the one in the middle is if you really love things that go KaBoom. All of these are for compressed air only. None are for steam. The relief valve on the left is tiny in real size and was from a 7 gallon portable air tank. The middle picture is of a relief valve that's very old but was cleaned up. I sure hope that this type isn't made anymore.
            Attached Files
            Last edited by Woussko; 08-18-2008, 10:48 AM.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: High Air compressor pressure

              Originally posted by CWSmith View Post
              "People don't mind strapping them on to their body."

              Perhaps that's because they don't have a clue as to what will happen if one of those tanks ruptures. I would be surprised if you'd live to tell about it, even if you were a close-proximity witness.

              However, I can find no reports of paintball tank injury! Perhaps that is because the danger has been recognized and the tanks are well designed for the rigors of paintballing and the nature of the supporting industry.

              As I understand it, paintball tanks are designed with "rupture plugs" which will vent the pressure if weakened. Tanks also get inspected at each refill as mandated by law and must be hydrotested and certified periodically. In most cases, these tanks are filled with CO2 or Nitrogen which is basically dry and there's little to no chance of internal corrosion.

              In the case of air compressor tanks, they are much larger in volume and, in most cases, made of steel which is subject to corrosion. The compressed air is most always "wet", and the resulting condensation will, over time, cause corrosion. Unlike paintball tanks, the only hydro-burst test they receive is at the point of manufacture. (Does your tank have an ASME stamp?)

              Likewise, a compressor tank will be filled many times during an operating period and it may not be drained as often as it should be. The resulting condensate build-up will corrode the tank, unlike dry CO2 or Nitrogen. In most cases this corrosion may eventually result in leakage, but the risk of "rupture" is very real and even with a 100 lbs of pressure you don't want to be in the same room if that happens.


              CWS
              Yeah I was really just kidding. There have been some extremely rare cases of old scuba tanks exploding next to people and incredibly not fatal but with significant injury. There have been no cases that I'm aware of with paintball tank explosions causing any serious injury. They do have a bunch of safetly redundancy built in from blast plates to carbon fiber or fiberglass wrap to ensure the just vent through the weave and making rupturing practically impossible. Paintball tanks are almost always filled with compressed air at fields now since high pressure compressors have become cheaper than continuosly renting nitrogen tanks. The biggest problem with them is they are made of aluminum which has a limited cycle life. They need hydrostatic testing about every 2 or 3 years.

              My point really was that I believe it can be perfectly safe to run higher pressure tanks as long as they are properly made and certified with the user taking the proper precautions and maintenance procedures.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: High Air compressor pressure

                Originally posted by Woussko View Post
                I wonder why they would want higher pressure. Most air tools are engineered for 90 PSI at the tool inlet. Might this be for special nailers? As for air receivers exploding, look back to when they were riveted rather than welded. A good many of them really went KABOOM blasting walls out and roofs off buildings. The reason we don't hear or read about such today is that you need to go way back. As CWS stated even a little 12 gallon receiver with 100 PSI inside will really make a big KABOOM if it did rupture. Manufactures and engineers work hard to make safe products, but with more and more imports and the all mighty $$$ factor, many home use machines are disasters waiting to happen.

                Imported or not I would hope at least recognizable brand name manufacturers have enough common sense to ensure their tanks will remain safe for a long time to come. In this lawsuit happy society I'm sure that gives them aplenty more incentive to ensure so as well. I would certainly feel safer running a 200 psi tank from a good recognizable manufacturer than a shady no name 100psi tank.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: High Air compressor pressure

                  A few weeks ago I bought a Craftsman 1-hp, 2-gal, 125 psi compressor for nailer applications. I looked high and low for the small Ridgid unit that was introduced this past Christmas, but it apparently no longer exists, even though it's shown here on the web site as a "new" product.

                  In any case, this little compressor is ideal for my use with it's cast iron, lubricated cylinder it's relatively quiet and the small size makes it easy to carry and transport in the back of the van.

                  However, I was concerned that this "made in China" unit had no ASME stamp on the little tank. The tank is nicely welded though, has a very well designed drain and I love the over compact design. From empty, it fills the tank within a minute or two and the cylinder hardly gets warm, though the aluminum cylinder head is a bit hot, but not extremely so. The compressor is only $120, but it's built well and nicely designed.

                  The one thing I noticed was the Intertek seal, ETL which has become a growing assurance label here in North America and is used for quality assurance of global manufacturing. Here's the Intertek web site for more detail: http://www.intertek-etlsemko.com/por..._LP_PG/ETL_LP/


                  CWS

                  Comment

                  Working...
                  X