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  • #16
    Re: Engine Manuals for Pressure Washer?

    Originally posted by Turbobeaver View Post
    Canucksartech,when you say your unit doesn't have the bracketry to hold the spray wand or the handle,are you referring to the metal storage hooks that are positioned on the back of the Ridgid name plate?If you are then that's funny because mine does have this on it.
    Yes, that's what mine is missing. That, and the "3000 psi, X.X gpm..." sticker. I will have to sort out soon how to get these.

    And I agree with you - yes, it does appear to be a really nice unit. I have some more testing/usage to put it through, so we'll see how it goes.

    Comment


    • #17
      Re: Engine Manuals for Pressure Washer?

      That's kind of weird how one machine would have it and the other doesn't,and we both bought them roughly around the same period of time.Even the two demo models that I have seen in two different stores had the storage hooks and the "Ridgid 3000PSI 2.6GPM" stickers on the name plates.I was looking at mine again today and the storage rack is simply bolted onto the back side of the face plate with two small bolts.I take it your face plate is pre drilled already and has the necessary mounting holes in which to bolt the storage rack to?No reason why they shouldn't send these out to you.Did you call the number that's listed in the Ridgid manual if your experiencing any missing parts?I noticed two days after I put mine together that one of the black plastic end caps that goes on the ends of the fold down handle was missing.I called up Ridgid at the number listed in the manual and they said they would get it right out to me.They didn't even want the serial number of the unit for verification purposes.I'm sure if the part I was missing was a bit more pricey,things would be way different.Canucksartech,hope you are successful in acquiring the missing parts for your Ridgid 3000.I'm interested to see how they treat you from a customer relations point of view.I hope they step up to the plate to make things right with you.Keep us posted.

      Comment


      • #18
        Re: Engine Manuals for Pressure Washer?

        TurboBeaver -Sounds like a superhero prostitute.

        J.C.

        Comment


        • #19
          Re: Engine Manuals for Pressure Washer?

          hey folks,I purchased the same 3000psi 2.6gpm pressure washer
          a week ago this past Sunday.I too was disappointed that it did not have the wand storage holder.RIDGID told me there was a running changeover
          during production because the bracket vibrating was causing the faceplate to crack.I put 2 hours on the unit when it starting leaking gasoline at the carb gasket.The carb nuts were tight.It had a RMV2.3G30 pump.2.3gpm??
          I took it back and exchanged for another #2.hooked it up and water was streaming out of the nozzle before I even pulled the trigger.I had a buddy hold the wand (just in case)and started the motor.The pump made a screeching sound then kicked in and the wand started working.When I
          pulled the trigger,good pressure then the pump made that sound again, the motor loaded up and almost died the pressure dropped substantially. After the third time,it went back to HD.It had a RMV2.5G30 pump.2.5gpm??
          The demo at HD has a RMV2.5G30 pump by the way.This third unit has
          been used about an hour is doing great so far it has a RMV2.3G30 pump.
          The pump was another changeover,they switched from the RMV2.5G30 to the RMV2.3G30.The pump is mfg.by Annovi Reverbi,it is not listed on their
          website or any suppliers.They have RMV2.3G25 or RMV2.5G27. I think it's
          another propietary item.I like this pressure washer so much,if they keep on malfunctioning,I'll keep on exchanging them until I get one that works.(lol)

          Comment


          • #20
            oil change and octane rating

            Originally posted by Woussko View Post
            With regard to oil changing I would personally recommend going old school. Change the oil after the first 5 hours, then 20 and then every 50 rather than 100 hours. ... Another thing very few small engine manuals tell is to please use 89 octane plus grade gasoline rather than regular 87. ...


            Thanks for the oil change recommendation. I completely forgot about break-in period and oil contaminants. Having run the engine for more than 5 hours - it is time for an oil change.

            I've been using 87 octane. What benefit to engine life will there be if I start using 89 octane? Is the extra energy in 89 going to help performance? Could I ask you to elaborate on this?

            Comment


            • #21
              Re: oil change and octane rating

              Originally posted by TFRIMET View Post
              I've been using 87 octane. What benefit to engine life will there be if I start using 89 octane? Is the extra energy in 89 going to help performance? Could I ask you to elaborate on this?
              I switched to a higher octane gas for small engines, because my leaf blower required it; and my lawn mower has been starting about 10 times easier since then.

              Comment


              • #22
                Re: Engine Manuals for Pressure Washer?

                The higher octane rating means the gasoline burns slightly slower. This helps prevent pre-ignition whereby the fuel ignites too soon and tries to force the piston downward on the upward compression stroke. Put another way the engine is trying to run in one direction but is sort of being forced to run backwards due to early ignition. With high performance 2 cycle engines requiring an oil & gasoline mix manufactures where finding pre-ignition to be an issue. Trying for a full burn to make for cleaner exhaust brought this on. In addition many engines were designed before all the additives were force added by EPA. I personally haven't had any problems running regular 87 in small 4 stroke cycle engines but some people I know claim they tried plus 89 and the engine did run better. I can see where this could be needed if the engine is running hard and at the lower end of the speed range. I would simply try running the engine on 89 plus and see if you notice any difference. A gallon is not that much more $$$ to give it a try.

                Special note: I have found my car engine to run better on some brands of regular than others. If it does ping a little adding a few gallons of super 93 fixes it. What I will say is that pressure washer engines do work hard. If we feed them plus grade gasoline and good oil with regular changes they will give us better service.

                Question: Have any of you noticed a change in the smell of gasoline over the summer. I sure have. Anymore what I buy around here (all major brands) has a slight fuel oil smell it didn't used to have.

                Comment


                • #23
                  Re: oil change and octane rating

                  Originally posted by TFRIMET View Post
                  I've been using 87 octane. What benefit to engine life will there be if I start using 89 octane? Is the extra energy in 89 going to help performance? Could I ask you to elaborate on this?
                  It's sort of the same benefits that you would receive with your family vehicle. The higher the octane level, the lower temperature at which the fuel ignites, and then burns more thoroughly and slightly slower. As a result, your engine burns fuel better, and at slightly lower engine temperatures, leading to less thermal breakdown of your oil, and thereby better protection from wear and tear on metal components. Also, with burning slower, it burns better, and transfers more completely the energy (hp) in the burning gas to the engine piston (better and more consistent pressures). I personally use 91 octane premium fuel in my vehicle, as well as in all of my yard tools, which are 4-cycle engines (Cub Cadet trimmer and push mower, Ridgid 3000psi pressure washer). You may not need 91 octane premium, but at the least, use 89 plus grade as Woussko said. For the little bit of price difference for the step up in gasoline grades, the little bit of added protection and performance that it gives these high stress and high performance little 4-stroke engines, the better.

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    high octane - will this void warranty ?

                    I changed the oil! It was a pretty intelligent design to have an oil drip hole, directly below the oil drain plug. It made catching the old oil much easier. I'm inclined, now, to change the oil much more frequently.

                    For the extra few bucks I think that I will go with 89 octane. I might even splurge for 91. I'll sleep on this for a few. I'm not firing up the engine until next weekend, in any case.

                    Occasionally, I do get a misfire when I shut down the engine.
                    Maybe 89 octane will remedy that.

                    From reading your posts, I can clearly see that lowering combustion temperature will be a benefit and delay the onset of mechanical failure.

                    I'd imagine that preignition happens without me noticing any symptoms. That is, the engine seems to hum...right along, on 87. Perhaps if I don't switch octanes now, I'll end up hearing the difference by next season!

                    Going 2 points up the octane chain should provide some consistency in averaging 87 or higher in rating. You never know what you are getting at the pump.

                    I own a 4 cylinder Plymouth Neon and understand that the engine is designed to work with either 87 octane, or provide better performance (as measured as an output of horsepower) with 91 octane. Not all car engines are engineered in this fashion, however.

                    Your experiences are that small engines do benefit from higher octane.

                    Will this void my warranty?
                    Last edited by TFRIMET; 09-14-2008, 09:24 PM. Reason: change title

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Re: high octane - will this void warranty ?

                      Originally posted by TFRIMET View Post
                      Will this void my warranty?
                      No, not at all. Most (99%, in my experience) small engine owner's manuals simply state that you must use 87 octane fuel "minimum". Meaning there is no warranty-slap-on-the-wrist if you use a better quality fuel. That's why better is simply ... better.

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Re: Engine Manuals for Pressure Washer?

                        hey folks,my 3000 psi unit leaked at the soap knob also.I spoke to RIDGID CS, they sent a new valve.IMO the valves are not defective,it's a matter of improper/proper assembly of the o-rings.There is 1 large and 2 small
                        o-rings.The problem,mine anyway,was the large o-ring had been pinched
                        and cut.I lubed the o-rings with petroleum jelly before assembly and the
                        leak is gone.The old o-rings appeared to be dry ie. no lube.That's a no-no
                        in o-ring land.Hope this info is helpful.
                        No engine manual with mine either,went to went to Robin America.com
                        Mine has started to leak at the trigger now,waiting to here back from CS.


                        Have A Good Day.

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Re: Engine Manuals for Pressure Washer?

                          Use the recommend octane level in your car. Most cars will retard the timing if the knock sensors sense pinging or pre ingition. Your cars computer will also compensate for the higher octane gas, so running 91 octane in a car that requires 87 will provide no added benefit other than giving the gas station more money. Generally higher octane gas is needed for higher compression engines or in engines that have increased cylinder pressure such as in supercharging or tubo charging, running NOS etc. When you raise compression, it generates more heat which causes pre ignition. A higher octane gas which takes longer to burn thus reducing the chance of pre iginition. Most performance engines that have high compression ratio's require premium fuel. Most 2 stroke engines have higher compression ratios than most 4 stroke small engines do so they require the higher octane. Run whats recommended, no need to waster money.

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            Re: Engine Manuals for Pressure Washer?

                            Originally posted by Den69RS96 View Post
                            Use the recommend octane level in your car. Most cars will retard the timing if the knock sensors sense pinging or pre ingition. Your cars computer will also compensate for the higher octane gas, so running 91 octane in a car that requires 87 will provide no added benefit other than giving the gas station more money. Generally higher octane gas is needed for higher compression engines or in engines that have increased cylinder pressure such as in supercharging or tubo charging, running NOS etc. When you raise compression, it generates more heat which causes pre ignition. A higher octane gas which takes longer to burn thus reducing the chance of pre iginition. Most performance engines that have high compression ratio's require premium fuel. Most 2 stroke engines have higher compression ratios than most 4 stroke small engines do so they require the higher octane. Run whats recommended, no need to waster money.
                            Not necessarily so. I have a 2005 Toyota Tacoma, with the TRD V6 engine in it. It is not supercharged or turbo'd, and is normally aspirated. However, it has a high-compression 10:1 engine (most V's are 7.5:1 or 8:1). It states that 87 octane is the "minimum required" and that 89 or 91 is recommended for better performance. Yet my wife's '96 Toyota Paseo, with a little 1.something 4-cylinder engine (definitely not high compression, and no way in heck is it turbo- or supercharged) says the same thing in the owner's manual about fuel grades.

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Re: Engine Manuals for Pressure Washer?

                              I think the bigger question that people should be asking themselves instead of worrying about octane ratings is the use of ethanol based fuels in small engines.Up here in Ontario,Canada,most fuels contain some degree of ethanol in the 10% margin.I'm not sure about premium fuels as I don't buy it at 10 cents a litre more than regular.

                              Irregardless of what octane rating of fuel you decide to use,suffice to say,these engines will out last the service life of the tool itself.I've got a 15 year old B&S Quattro 4.0 on a lawn mower that keeps trucking along and I've only ever used 87 octane fuel in it since day one.If I get 15 years out of this pressure washer before the pump goes on it,I'd consider myself a blessed man.Good running lawn mower engines get chucked on a daily basis not because they won't run any more but because the engines are falling through the rusted out decks.It's just not economically feasible at some point to invest any more money or time into repairs.Given the age of the tool and cost of replacement parts,it's usually cheaper to replace than to repair.Follow the engine manufacturer recommendations,do regular oil changes and there's no reason why you shouldn't get a long service life out of your engines even at 87 octane.These are modern engines which are designed to run on todays available fuels.On small displacement engines like these,the differences or advantages in running higher octane based fuels are negligible.Keep your money in your wallet unless you like to spend more money on fuel costs than you really have to.I figure the oil companies of the world are already rich enough.

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Higher Octane Ratings

                                I was giving some more thought about what I learned on this forum about higher octane gasolines.

                                I had previously reasoned that higher octane meant more energy available. It's something I learned way back in organic chemistry (didn't quite pass the class, however).

                                I was still puzzled that higher octane gas would combust at a lower temperature.

                                This is what I am thinking, now ... higher octane gas does offer more energy, and that more of the energy goes into making expansive gases and not heat. This makes more compression power available and not at the expense of making more wasted heat.

                                I don't see any problem with 89 or higher octane. If you don't mind a few more pennies to the gallon. (or dollars by the time you are reading this post)

                                Mechanical breakdown is inevitable. Higher octane appears to provide a longer engine life (if only by being more oil friendly in the temperature range). In my own humble opinion, the Ridgid pressure washer appears to be made out of material that is imprenetrable to the environment and its frame would last as equally long as its engine. I believe that the better I take care of the engine, the longer the pressure washer will last.

                                Now if Ridgid would only get my pistola out of back order - ah - never mind - HD swapped out the part today.

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