Announcement Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.
Old chainsaw question - Skil Saw 1642 Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Old chainsaw question - Skil Saw 1642

    I was at the recycling center this weekend and picked a Skil Saw 1642 chainsaw out of the scrap metal dumpster. After a new air filter, spark plug, fuel lines and a good teardown and cleaning the thing fired right up and runs great. I wasn't sure on the fuel mixture because it wasn't marked on the fuel cap so I assumed that 40:1 would at least let me start the thing. I talked to Skil and they said they haven't done chainsaws in 20 years and have no documentation on the saw. Anyone have any ideas. If it continues to run on 40:1 should I just use it or is there potential to break/ruin something?

  • #2
    Re: Old chainsaw question - Skil Saw 1642

    Don't know if it is older or not. Going by the model number I would say older. Actually the saw is a 1624 - Type 2, not a 1642 as prev posted. Has an automatic oiler and hand guard (kickback guard?) so it seems that they made these things alright around 20 years ago.

    Pardon my ignorance but I have never owned a chainsaw so I am learning and have a few questions.

    When replacing the chain, how do I know what the correct size replacement is; bar length or number of drive teeth?

    Is there a bar end sprocket and if so does it need to be lubed also?

    What is the proper tension for the chain?

    Should the chain move/jump when the saw is idling or should I adjust the carb so that the chain does not move?

    Thanks in advance for the help. I will post pics/video tonight.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Old chainsaw question - Skil Saw 1642

      Originally posted by mheriot View Post
      Don't know if it is older or not. Going by the model number I would say older. Actually the saw is a 1624 - Type 2, not a 1642 as prev posted. Has an automatic oiler and hand guard (kickback guard?) so it seems that they made these things alright around 20 years ago.

      Pardon my ignorance but I have never owned a chainsaw so I am learning and have a few questions.

      When replacing the chain, how do I know what the correct size replacement is; bar length or number of drive teeth?

      Is there a bar end sprocket and if so does it need to be lubed also?

      What is the proper tension for the chain?

      Should the chain move/jump when the saw is idling or should I adjust the carb so that the chain does not move?

      Thanks in advance for the help. I will post pics/video tonight.
      Dangerous power tool to learn on but I'll try and answer some of your questions. Replacement chains are measured by "links" and when ordering the first number is the bar length, so if your bar is 16" and the chain has 57 links you order a 16/57. Then there is the "Pitch", don't ask just give your make and model. Proper tension is the thickness of a dime when the chain is pulled away from the bar at it's center when cold! Do not tension a hot chain. You can lube the bar end sprocket every time you flip the bar which should be done every time you change chains or every couple of hours run time. Proper care of the chainsaw is important but proper use is also very important. Do not wear loose clothing, do wear gloves. Always be prepared for "Kick Back" this is when the saw unexpectedly comes back at you and away from what you are cutting, very dangerous tool! The chain should not move at idle and if it does it is not necessarily an indication that the idle is too fast. The clutch may be defective and is engaging even at a normal idle. IF you have a small engine shop nearby bring the saw in and ask if someone can walk you through it. The Chainsaw is one of my favorite tools but it can be very dangerous if not handled properly and respected. Please be careful.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Old chainsaw question - Skil Saw 1642

        What Frankiearms said.

        I have been running chainsaws for so long I don't even like to think about it. Two years ago clearing brush a saw kicked back and hit my thigh. Just lucky my cell phone was in my pocket and the chain hit it instead of flesh. I could have been in a world of hurt. I now wear kevlar chaps and safety glasses. Call me sissy but that was too close a call.

        -Tom

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Old chainsaw question - Skil Saw 1642

          Originally posted by Frankiarmz View Post
          Dangerous power tool to learn on but I'll try and answer some of your questions.
          Didn't say I've never used power tools just never a chainsaw.

          Thanks for the info. This should make it easier to find a new chain. How common is a 12" bar nowadays?

          Obviously kickback happens when the chain catches on something whether it be a knot in the wood or getting pinched in the cut of a log but as I see it the saw will only kick back if the top of the chain gets caught. True or false? If the bottom of the chain catches I can only see the saw getting pulled away from you.

          I agree with you both, safety should be at the top of everyones list. It is so easy to prevent injuries from happening that I still don't understand why more people don't take the appropriate safety measures.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Old chainsaw question - Skil Saw 1642

            Didn't mean to insult you with all the safety stuff, I just think Chainsaws are really dangerous. 12" bars are used more commonly on electric chainsaws and pruners but are available for all sorts of models. Regarding kickback, I am not absolutely positive if it is primarily the tip binding which causes kickback but I take the approach that it can happen regardless of where the chain is cutting. On average the chain is running around the bar at fifty miles an hour, that's fast. I suggested visiting a small engine shop because most of the guys are very helpful and nothing beats actually seeing the chain properly adjusted or having them check the clutch. I think no matter how many power tools we have used or owned when it is something different or new it presents a opportunity to learn. I hope you enjoy your chainsaw, they are my favorite tool.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Old chainsaw question - Skil Saw 1642

              Thanks again for the help. I just pulled the chain off to check the pitch and drive teeth and realized that the bar is 16". It looks like a relatively new Poulan chain although it appears to have been used extensively with no sharpening at all. I am assuming that the chisel tips should be sharp to the touch, if not at least have a disinguishable edge. Either way I will purchase a new chain, one thing that I have learned over the years is that a dull tool is a dangerous tool (utility knife, radial saw, circ saw, chisel, etc.)

              I will post pics tomorrow so you all can see my new, "antique" tool.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Old chainsaw question - Skil Saw 1642

                Somewhere in the dark recesses of my mind I recall a problem I had with a chainsaw chain. I think different types of chain have different drive links. Homelight chain won't necessarily fit a Poulan drive sprocket or any other type although it might fit some. Check the drive sprocket and see if it is chewed up. If so the wrong type of chain was used.

                I think Frankiearmz has the right idea, a visit to a small engine shop might be in order. They can probably suggest the correct chain to use.

                -Tom

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Old chainsaw question - Skil Saw 1642

                  A good small engine or better yet a good dealer repair shop for chain saws should be a big help. You may not need a new chain but let them look your's over and advise of it's condition. Oregon makes many types of chains and bars. Call and try to find a dealer for Oregon. They may have to order in the right bar and chain but it's worth it over trying to substitute wrong parts. You may or may not have what's called a sprocket nose bar. Some on smaller chainsaws are just rounded. If it is a sprocket or roller type have them show you how to grease it.

                  Chains need to be sharp and drag links in good condition and properly shaped. Only an expert with proper equipment should sharpen chains other than just light touching up with a file.

                  One thing you want to try not to do is install a brand new chain if your sprocket on the clutch has warn or damaged teeth. A good repair shop can help with this. Trying to find and get parts may be tuff. A bar and chain is one thing but other parts may be a pain. Good luck

                  As for kicking back, if you have the upper side of the bar touch say a tree branch it will push the saw towards you. What's most dangerous is to have any part of the nose make contact. In such a case it can kick the saw so it flies up and can hit you on your face or head. There are nose guards (attaches to bar) and I recommend having one installed if you get a new bar. Also ask about low kick chain.

                  Chain normally comes to repair shops on reels. They have equipment to cut it to length and rivet together using special links. As it stretches from use they may need to remove one link over time.

                  A good shop can match the sprocket, chain and bar. They may need to make some modifications so that newer and safer chain can be used.
                  Last edited by Woussko; 10-06-2008, 11:40 PM.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Old chainsaw question - Skil Saw 1642

                    Not the best but this video shows some about what kickback is. The operator knew what to expect. In too many cases the chainsaw kicks hard and people get seriously hurt. FEAR may be your best friend.

                    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uoyyj...eature=related

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Old chainsaw question - Skil Saw 1642

                      Just a word on small engine repair shops and older chainsaws, in my area they won't even look at my older Homelites. They (all of them) told me parts are hard to come by and it's not worth their time or my money. They simply repair the brands they sell and or the the more current machines such as Stihl, Husqvarna, Echo. They don't even want to bother with newer but lower end products such as Poulan and brand new cheaper Homelites such as sold in HomeDepot. If you can find an older more friendly local store you may have better luck than I did or you can try the Internet, there are some real good guys who can fix just about anything. Remember at some point with parts being scarce( not bars and chains) you may have to put that older model to pasture and buy something new. I had a thirty plus year old Homelite 360 repaired a couple times then broke again and I had to admit I was putiing good money to bad. The newer Chainsaws are expensive for the better models and sort of flimsy (plastic choke levers and such) primer bulbs, etc, but they are pretty powerful and much lighter than the old dinosaurs I own.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Old chainsaw question - Skil Saw 1642

                        I inspected the drive sprocket last night and it looks worn. It is noticeable where the drive links on the chain have been bottoming out inbetween the sprocket teeth. You can also see "peening" or rounding off of the bottom of the drive links on the chain. I will take to my local power equipment repair shop to see if they can match up a new drive sprocket and chain and also have them take a look at the bar to make sure it is in good shape. Luckily I found a guy about 20 miles from me that has some parts for this saw but he said he will also try a newer one if the part fits. Like you previously said, a bunch of shops won't even look at the saw.

                        Thanks for the kickback video, it's helpful to see what kickback is and not just read about it. Now I know what to expect and what I can do to try and avoid this situation.
                        Last edited by mheriot; 10-07-2008, 10:34 AM.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Old chainsaw question - Skil Saw 1642

                          For what it's worth there are people in the USA and other countries that enjoy "OLD IRON" and like restoring and showing antique machinery. If nothing else you might try looking up shows for such in your area. County fairs, especially smaller counties are a place to start. One thing you may find is that good small engine shops slow down over the winter other than for snow thrower sales and service. If you let them know you have time one of them may be more willing to spend some time on your saw. It needs to be more like a restoration project rather than making money repair.

                          Please come back and update us on progress good or bad.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Old chainsaw question - Skil Saw 1642

                            I don't know if this is anywhere near you (I saw MA) in your profile, but if it is you might want to just go to the show and see if anyone has old timer chainsaws displayed. If yes, tell about your's and ask about parts for it. You just may get lucky.

                            Central Massachusetts Steam, Gas and Machinery Assn. Fall Swap Meet - Orange, MA
                            This show is on Saturday the 11th.

                            More info - http://www.farmcollectorshowdirector...nt/view/id/541
                            Last edited by Woussko; 10-10-2008, 11:55 AM.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: Old chainsaw question - Skil Saw 1642

                              Worked a little on the saw last night. It turns out the high idle and moving chain (while the throttle was off) just turned out to be an idle adjustment. 1/4 turn and the chain stopped moving and the idle slowed right down.

                              The saw right now is at an engine shop, the guy said he might have a drive sprocket for it. If he has one the only thing left to do would be to take a file to the chain and sharpen up the Poulan P101S that is currently on there. Chain is in good shape, just needs to be sharpened.

                              I'll be back with an update tonight along with the pics I promised.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X