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  • Fried Batteries? What to do..

    I have a 18v NiCD Drill (Not the hammer version) and I was drilling through a stud in my house with a narrow bit when the drill just quit. Nothing gradual either... So I switched the battery and tried the other one, it quit also.. When I put the batteries on the charger, they gave me the defective lights...

    I'm thinking it's the drill thats causing the problem and killing my batteries as soon as they are loaded because I tried to charge one (the other one already said defective after the situation occured) and it charged, but when I tried to load it, it gave me nothing and then turned out to have a problem in the charger aswell.

    I didn't get a chance to register for lifetime warranty so unfortunately I'm pretty screwed on all ends aren't I?

    Thanks..

  • #2
    Re: Fried Batteries? What to do..

    Yes, you're screwed!
    Perhaps the switch is bad.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Fried Batteries? What to do..

      Originally posted by superlack View Post
      I didn't get a chance to register for lifetime warranty so unfortunately I'm pretty screwed on all ends aren't I
      The type of warranty may depend upon when you bought your drill:

      **90-DAY SATISFACTION GUARANTEE
      **LIMITED THREE YEAR WARRANTY
      **Lifetime Service Agreement (must register within 90 days)

      Check out warranty information on the website and gather your receipt+UPC

      All warranty communications should be directed to: RIDGID handheld + stationary power tool technical service 1-866-539-1710

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Fried Batteries? What to do..

        Originally posted by reConx View Post
        The type of warranty may depend upon when you bought your drill:

        **90-DAY SATISFACTION GUARANTEE
        **LIMITED THREE YEAR WARRANTY
        **Lifetime Service Agreement (must register within 90 days)

        Check out warranty information on the website and gather your receipt+UPC

        All warranty communications should be directed to: RIDGID handheld + stationary power tool technical service 1-866-539-1710
        I didn't remember anything about the 3year warranty.. ( I hope I still have the upc around..) Thanks very much, I'll give them a call tomorrow.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Fried Batteries? What to do..

          Being you're into electrical work, maybe you can figure this out and give it a try. If you have a test light bulb socket and a 12 Volt auto battery charger and some clip leads connect the negative battery charger lead to negative on one of your batteries. Then connect the test socket in series with the positive battery terminal and positive battery charger lead. Put a 100 Watt, 120 Volt light bulb in the test socket and power up the battery charger. Leave it connected for a few minutes. Then unplug it, disconnect the battery and put the battery into the correct charger. What happens now? In some cases over discharged batteries will not charge using the normal charger and may cause "Defective Battery" light(s) to come on. The above will put some charge into the battery. The light bulb in series is for current limiting.

          Note: You can substitute a 25 Watt 12 Volt light bulb such as is used in recreational vehicles.
          Last edited by Woussko; 10-21-2008, 09:25 PM.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Fried Batteries? What to do..

            The way Superlack describes it, it doesn't sound like a battery that is just run down unless he kept on using it when it started getting low and kept trying to use it when it got stuck.

            A simpler way to 'jump' a battery is to take another 18 volt battery (or similar; I've used 21.6 v) fully charged and connect the negative of one battery to the negative of the other, and the positive to positive. It only takes a few seconds to provide a boost charge to the low battery. Do NOT have the batteries connected for more than 5 seconds. You can overheat the batteries and destroy them both.

            NOTE: before connecting batteries ensure you know which is the +ve and which is the -ve of each battery. If the batteries are not the same type, the terminals may not be on the same side. The Ridgid terminals are on the opposite side to the other 3 makes of batteries I have.

            I have used this method very successfully a couple of times. However, I prefer to use the charger to try and recover batteries. It is much safer. When you place a battery on a charger, it provides a slow charge and checks to see if it can recognize it has a battery connected. If it does not recognise it as a battery, it switches off. Try placing the battery on the charger, let it sit for 15 minutes, if it does not start charging, remove it for 10 minutes and try again. After a few attempts at this, they often start charging. I've jumped batteries twice, both times it worked OK, I've tried this other method half a dozen times, and it has worked every time. Once I ran an 18 v battery down to 3 volts (left a laser on and placed it in the bag), and it recovered using the charger after a couple of tries.

            Neither of these methods will work if the battery is damaged.

            Your batteries should also have a date code on them. It is part of the serial number. There will be a couple of letters followed by 4 numbers. The first 2 numbers tell you the year it was made, and the second 2 numbers tell you which week of the year it was made. If you don't have your reciept, you may be able to use this date code to prove the battery is under 3 years.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Fried Batteries? What to do..

              superlack

              Idea 2: If you have a VOM Multimeter that can read 0-25, 0-30 or 0-50 Volts DC or a Digital with a suitable range please measure the open circuit Voltage of each battery and post. Also parallel connect a test socket with a 60 or 100 Watt 120 Volt light bulb in it with the leads of the meter and post the Voltage drop. Better yet if you have 10 - 25 Ohm, 100 Watt power resistor that would make a good load. Just have it connected a few seconds for Voltage measurements.

              While it would be wild for 2 batteries to open circuit it could happen. I do like the idea of putting a battery in the charger for 15 minutes and if it doesn't charge remove it and after 10-15 minutes putting it back in.

              My first idea was about the same as jumping batteries only I had a light bulb in series for a little current limiting.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Fried Batteries? What to do..

                Questions that should be helpful

                About how old is your cordless drill and the batteries?

                Did the drill seem to stall out or was it running along fine and just quit?

                About how long did it run on each battery?

                Have you noticed the drill acting up in anyway before this happened? Sluggish? Longer than normal battery charging time required? Short recharge time?

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Fried Batteries? What to do..

                  I'll give those suggestions a shot in the morning. I'm trying the charger one as I type. Thanks for the responses!

                  Originally posted by Woussko View Post
                  Questions that should be helpful

                  About how old is your cordless drill and the batteries?
                  The drill is about a year old

                  Originally posted by Woussko View Post
                  Did the drill seem to stall out or was it running along fine and just quit?
                  It was running along fine until it just quit suddenly..

                  Originally posted by Woussko View Post
                  About how long did it run on each battery?
                  Just about what I'd get from a battery when I first got the drill.. I didn't notice any drop in the charge it would hold.

                  Originally posted by Woussko View Post
                  Have you noticed the drill acting up in anyway before this happened? Sluggish? Longer than normal battery charging time required? Short recharge time?
                  A few times I had got to work to find that the battery was dead flat but that was probably from it being triggered in the bag overnight.

                  What I find strange is that one battery was fully charged but got murdered as soon as I loaded it in the drill, with a fraction of a second worth of operating time at the beginning (if i remember correctly)

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Fried Batteries? What to do..

                    "Fried Batteries? What to do.."
                    How about asking for a side of gravy to go with that?

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Fried Batteries? What to do..

                      With the drill, batteries and charger being only about a year old, if you have the receipt (bill of sale) then I would contact Ridgid customer service. They should be under warranty and you may as well try getting replacement batteries. Most likely they will want you to take everything to a repair center which is a good idea. There may be a problem with the charger not charging up the batteries.

                      I would try forcing a little charge into both batteries and then putting them on the charger. If it seems like it is charging leave the battery on the charger several hours.

                      If you end up having to outright purchase replacement batteries, try calling up large battery dealers in your area. Some places can open up battery packs and install new Ni-Cad cells at a lower cost to you than buying new battery packs. They need the proper cells, a special spot welder and other equipment. In my area Batteries Plus does this for many battery packs. In one case with a small battery, I replaced the cells myself. I found replacements with solder tabs already on them. Most use a Sub C Ni-Cad cell. You do need rapid charge cells. In some cases there's a thermal sensor in the pack that also needs to be replaced.

                      I really think being only about a year old you may get some warrenty replacements. It's worth a try. 1-800-474-3443

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