Announcement Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.
DC or TS wired for 220v? Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • DC or TS wired for 220v?

    1) I just picked up a 1.5 hp Steel City DC at Woodcraft's sale and am considering setting it over to 220v. I've also got a well used and loved 3612 that is also capable of being wired for 220v. So, which would you wire for 220v the TS or the DC?

    2) what is the best plug to put onto the 220v wire?, I had the 220v run installed when I d the basment wired and the electrician set a huge receptacle, as if for a dryer and left me an end capwhich seems far to large for the gauge wire I have on the equipment. It's curently a 6-30 receptacle and the endcap is a convertable 6-30 or 6-50.

    I appreciate the help,
    Chef HDAN

  • #2
    Re: DC or TS wired for 220v?

    If the electrician ran #6 220V to that receptacle, he did you a real favor. What he did is set you up to run a subpanel, so that you can actually add several more circuits yourself (or have him add more circuits), without having to pull new runs from the main box. If you are so inclined, you should be able to run two new circuits and set both your DC and your TS to run 220.

    Check the breaker in the main box that feeds this circuit, and see what size it is. If it's 50 AMP, then you're set. If it's 30 AMP, then you need to verify the size of the wire before changing the breaker in the main box. Either way, you can still install a subpanel in the basement and add new branch circuits from there. No power is really gained or lost, but the motor will draw half the amps when running at 220 compare to running at 110.

    If you are able to put receptacles in such a place that you don't need any extension cords, then I'd go with a standard 220v 20 AMP receptacle and replace the end of the tool with the appropriate male connector. Technically, you could use a standard 110v outlet and use the plug that is already on the tool, but I would not recommend that. The 220v receptacles look the way they do for good reason - keeps people from sticking a 110v devices into a 220v outlet.

    Jim

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: DC or TS wired for 220v?

      Originally posted by jhill3264 View Post
      Technically, you could use a standard 110v outlet and use the plug that is already on the tool, but I would not recommend that.
      Not if you want to be up to code.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: DC or TS wired for 220v?

        Originally posted by cpw View Post
        Not if you want to be up to code.
        Right. That's why I don't recommend it. But people do try it especially if they are converting a 110v device to 220v. They also do this because they want to be able to use a "standard" extension cord. Again, it technically works, but is just begging for something stupid to happen down the road. Of course, that's why it is against code.

        That's why I brought up the point about extension cords. If you're still going to need an extension cord for either of these, then I don't think I'd bother rewiring for 220v. There really isn't enough current draw to warrant it. Dedicated circuit? Sure, but going 220 won't really gain you much over 110v. If you still want to go to 220v, but need a longer cord, I would actually replace the cord on the tool with a new cord long enough to reach without an extension and then use the proper 220v plug.

        Jim

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: DC or TS wired for 220v?

          If your shop is limited in breakers then 220 is nice it removes the saws and what ever else from the lighting circuit, it will create less dimming of the lights when the motors are starting, balancing out the electrical usage in ones home, unless you have some big voltage drops, I really do not think you will see any power differences on the saw, (it may start easier and quicker tho), for the most part it seems to me, to run some thing on less amps (more voltage) is probably an improvement, for the longevity of the motor and tool,
          and when it is said and done I wire them both to 220 volt,
          If you have enough circuits, (not receptacle/plug ins) to separate the saw and other larger motor driven tools then I probably would not hardly consider the change over to 220, but if your limited in the circuits I would change it over to get it and DC on a separate circuit,

          probably the best is put in a small sub panel and then wire out a few 20 amp 220 volt receptacles, that the saw and the DC could plug into, the quick way is to make an adaptor, that would use the dryer plug 30 amp 220 volt, and then go into a box and put a few receptacles that are 20 amp or 15 amp 220 volt, using number 10 wire to make the adapter, up with, you have normally some over load protection on the motor of the saw and DC, but your breaker would be over sized considerable for any additional protection, (but breakers are for the wiring in the wall protection, not the item plug into it), the easy way is to make an adaptor, that is how many 220 volt tools are used on a job site, is they usually carry an adaptor to plug in to a range or dryer outlet and tie into the power that way for say a commercial floor sander, or similar tool.

          I think I read where the TS took 14 amps on 120, on 220 it would run on about 7 to 8 amps, if the dust collector was the same draw, your only using about half of the available power on the 220 volt out let, (saying it is protected by 30 amp breaker), where you would nearly need two dedicated circuits one for the TS, and one for the DC, on 120 volts, and would need it for sure if your 120 outlets are breaker-ed with 15 amp breakers, and if you get a quick over load or a weak breaker you will be tripping them often,

          the picture is of a 220 volt 20 amp or 15 amp receptacle the 15 amp has both blades flat, and the 20 has the one turned vertical, (oposite of the 120 volt 20 amp plug configuration),

          the yellow plug picture is of a 15 amp 220 volt plug,
          Attached Files
          Last edited by BHD; 11-26-2008, 08:14 PM.
          Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
          ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
          "The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good."
          attributed to Samuel Johnson
          ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
          PUBLIC NOTICE: Due to recent budget cuts, the rising cost of electricity, gas, and oil...plus the current state of the economy............the light at the end of the tunnel, has been turned off.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: DC or TS wired for 220v?

            so i'm just curious. is jhil suggesting that it is possible to plug a standard 110v plug into a 220v outlet? it seems to be undoable as the spades of the 110v plug are vertical and the spade slots of the 220v outlet are horizontal.
            there's a solution to every problem.....you just have to be willing to find it.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: DC or TS wired for 220v?

              Originally posted by FINER9998 View Post
              so i'm just curious. is jhil suggesting that it is possible to plug a standard 110v plug into a 220v outlet? it seems to be undoable as the spades of the 110v plug are vertical and the spade slots of the 220v outlet are horizontal.
              He is suggesting if you use the wrong one for both it would work, until you fry a 110 piece of equipment by plugging it into 110v outlet that is incorrectly wired for 220v outlet.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: DC or TS wired for 220v?

                Thanks to all for the info.

                BHD, I've got a few circuts that were added when I had the basment wired, including the 220 line run with the plan to eventually get DC. It was a "as long as you're here" type of add on that has been a great boon, no more tripped breakers, well except for the Band Saw from time to time. I had no DC specs so I'm guessing my friend's electrician friend, set me up for whatever I might get. I've learned a few more things since my original post. The unit is ambiguously labled as being 240v in the manual and 230v on the specs here; http://www.steelcitytoolworks.com/pr...y=5&tool=65200 Your comment about reducing the load is interesting because I now know that I have to change the breaker, receptacle, and plug to 15 amp units. I currently don't trip breakers when running any of the equipment with the shop vac, BS just acts weird, and figure that as long as I'm wired for it I'll run the DC on the 220v. But... is it 230v or 240v I need, and where in the hell am I going to find a remote control switch for that?

                I'm waiting for Steel City to get back to me with some info, I'm running it on 110v right now and am amazed by the diffrence from the shop vac, wife's much happier too, I don't track in as much dust, not to mention the health benefits!

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: DC or TS wired for 220v?

                  220 through basically 250 volts means the same thing, if you would check thought out the country and various cities, the low voltage will vary from 110 to about 125, and on the 220 side from 220 to 250 on the high side,
                  ours is actually 117 volts and 234,on the high side, in a near by town that maintains there own power, the power in some sections of the town are nearer the 110/220 volt range and one block had power (until we got the city to put in a new transformer), in the 134/268 volt range, that group of houses went though appliances very fast. light bulbs would only last a few days normally,

                  Much depends on where and how the transformers are and the distance and the voltage drop there is a range in what the equipment will operate,

                  but normal single phase will range in the 220 to 250 volts, so it is hard to come up with a exact statement, in a manual or motor plate to say this is a 220 or a 230 or a 234 or a 240 or a 250 volt unit,

                  I think the general theory on induction motors, is + or - maximum of 10% of the rated name plate, so a 120 volt name plate would suggest from 108 volts to 132 volts, or a 220 volt name plate would suggest a range of 198 volts to 242 volts, for example,
                  granted closer to the name plate rating the better you are, less heating and over loads and stress on the wire and the insulation's,

                  more on over and under voltage and frequency, (frequency on the grid, one should not have to worry about, if you use a generator to power there may be a concern),
                  http://www.usmotors.com/products/ProFacts/1-133.htm

                  but most motors are designed to operate in a window of approximately 120 volts or 240 volts, and many years ago, it was mostly stated at 110 and 220, some locations call it 115 and 230, so it is more to say the basic hot to neutral on common single phase power or Hot to Hot on common single phase power,

                  Now in some commercial that have poly phase power you will have a 110 and 208 voltage on a star winding, of the transformer, and most induction motors will operate jsut fine on the high side at the 208 voltage even on a single phase application, and even in some locations you will find that they will have only "single" phase as they have split up the phases to balance out the loads on the transformers and lines,
                  Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
                  ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
                  "The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good."
                  attributed to Samuel Johnson
                  ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
                  PUBLIC NOTICE: Due to recent budget cuts, the rising cost of electricity, gas, and oil...plus the current state of the economy............the light at the end of the tunnel, has been turned off.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: DC or TS wired for 220v?

                    So, if I'm understanding you correctly...
                    If I;
                    1) Change the breaker to a double pole 15 amp breaker matched to my panel
                    2) Change the receptacle to a NEMA 6-15R
                    3) Change the cordcap to a NEMA 6-15P
                    I should be good to go with the DC and will not have any issues using an off the shelf 220v remote switch, providing that the remote switch matches the plug & receptacle...

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: DC or TS wired for 220v?

                      Originally posted by ChefHDAN View Post
                      So, if I'm understanding you correctly...
                      If I;
                      1) Change the breaker to a double pole 15 amp breaker matched to my panel
                      2) Change the receptacle to a NEMA 6-15R
                      3) Change the cordcap to a NEMA 6-15P
                      I should be good to go with the DC and will not have any issues using an off the shelf 220v remote switch, providing that the remote switch matches the plug & receptacle...
                      Yes, on the short answer,

                      I would not necessarily change out the breaker, if it is a 30 amp or less, I would put in a 4x4 box if there is not all ready one, it was me, and put in two receptacles, and I would probably put in the 20 amp receptacles NEMA 6-20R if the cost is not any major difference. and probably the double units, not the single, (such as in the picture. jsut more future versatility), the NEMA 6-15P or the NEMA 6-20P will both fit the NEMA 6-20R


                      Then proceed as you stated, that way if you get some thing else 220/250 volt, you would have a plug ready to use, The breaker is for the wiring in the wall not the tool, the tool should have some type of over load protection on it a reset switch, on the motor or some thing, If you want to down size the breaker it will not hurt any thing but not a need in my opinion.

                      In my shop I wired double 110 receptacles ever where, and have never regretted it, so ever box has 4 plug ins.
                      not I did not do that on the 220, even tho many are Doubles, but I have a dedicated 220 receptacle to ever 220 machine, as my Table saw, wide sander, radial arm saw, planer, horizontal shaper, and vertical spindle shaper, are all 220, and a few extra receptacles as well.

                      picture is of a NEMA 6-20R Duplex Receptacle manufactured by Leviton
                      Attached Files
                      Last edited by BHD; 11-30-2008, 08:48 PM.
                      Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
                      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
                      "The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good."
                      attributed to Samuel Johnson
                      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
                      PUBLIC NOTICE: Due to recent budget cuts, the rising cost of electricity, gas, and oil...plus the current state of the economy............the light at the end of the tunnel, has been turned off.

                      Comment

                      Working...
                      X