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  • #31
    Re: Opinion on 24V vs 18V drill sets

    Originally posted by tinmack View Post
    Ummmmmm......do you realize there's guys on this forum that own cases full of guns and would hunt you down for less than what you just said/implied to canucksartech??

    Guys have gotten banned for less........especially guys with less than a hundred posts, most of them annoying critiques of tools manufactured by the site sponsor.....
    Man, it was such an easy target, I just had to

    It's a joke, I hope he doesn't take it seriously. As for guns, I lived in Moscow downtown for 4 years and had guns and knives pointed at me, doesn't scare me.

    PS: Wanted to leave this one for later, but ehhhhhhhhh:



    I actually owned one and tested it versus Makita BHP451 and Dewalt DC925 in pressure treated lumber. Unlike you, mr canucksartech
    Last edited by DRC-Wartex; 12-15-2008, 10:27 PM.

    Comment


    • #32
      Re: Opinion on 24V vs 18V drill sets

      [quote=DRC-Wartex;194029]There is a Makita and Delta/PorterCable/Dewalt centers here in Halifax which have a huge stock of parts for pretty much anything and I can just walk in there and buy some obscure plastic gizmo for my router or a drill or have them put it in within a day, 4 days MAX. In 2 years of buying parts from either one I never had anything backordered.


      Just because you happen to live within five miles of one of their service centers and you happened to get your tools fixed is not an indicator of quality of service.

      Or have you forgotten your own words?

      Comment


      • #33
        Re: Opinion on 24V vs 18V drill sets

        Originally posted by DRC-Wartex View Post
        Damn, will have to check it out tomorrow. That's impressive.

        Edit: just looked again, has the same spec as ridgid except voltage. There must be more than just magic to get twice the speed. Will have to buy one and test it I bet the initial SPM on full battery charge exceed 2500 or the zero orbit is not really zero.

        DRC W,

        Whatever the reason for the Craftsman success, it's a wrap. Just as other manufacturers tout some engineering prowess or some new battery marvel that we all should have, the Craftsman bested some major players with their entry. If they bested the field with an engineering inclusion to their saw, it worked! The article sites their achievement in print. Let it stand as is - it is what it is. If they get sales and recognition it just means the others have to some how follow suit in order to maintain market share and status. They are not trying to say the Craftsman is a Ferreri, but Craftsman is saying it ain't no Yugo and deserves a nod by the average man. To that I say - "Good Job".

        Comment


        • #34
          Re: Opinion on 24V vs 18V drill sets

          Originally posted by Hottrodd View Post

          Just because you happen to live within five miles of one of their service centers and you happened to get your tools fixed is not an indicator of quality of service.

          Or have you forgotten your own words?
          Did I say it was? I just said I can buy parts there easily. Or you are trying to say I can buy parts from those ridgid "repair centres"? I don't think so.

          ------------------------------------

          Spinalzo, it is not a wrap because TOTT is not the ultimate source for me. They are OK but I'd rather test it myself.
          Last edited by DRC-Wartex; 12-16-2008, 01:54 AM.

          Comment


          • #35
            Re: Opinion on 24V vs 18V drill sets

            [quote=DRC-Wartex;194072]Did I say it was? I just said I can buy parts there easily. Or you are trying to say I can buy parts from those ridgid "repair centres"? I don't think so.[quote]

            No, you said that a persons experience with their service center is not an indicator of quality of service.

            How else would you judge the quality of service, except by the quality of service that you recieve. I realize that my experience doesn't mean that everyone will have a good one, but there are those that are happy with the service they receive.

            Why would need to buy parts from Ridgid if you signed up for the LSA? They will fix the tool for free. I have fixed my own tools before, but if it's under warranty, why not let them fix it? That was one of the reasons for buying Ridgid in the first place.

            Comment


            • #36
              Re: Opinion on 24V vs 18V drill sets

              I've just got to make this comment. It has been really bugging me as to what it means, and seems to have been referenced several times as a method of somehow evaluating how good the design of the too is:

              "Metals that are used for gears are low-grade steel (take one off the motor spindle from Bosch and one from a Ridgid drill, and then hammer it on an anvil, see what happens) and gearbox is some kind of soft, large-grain alloy." (DRC-Wartex, 12-11-2008).

              How can you tell the gears are low-grade steel by hammering it on an anvil. I assume the result was the gear was softer than others and bent when hammered. This is not an indication of low-grade steel, it is an indication that it is more ductile, and could show that some thought went went into the design. I have designed gearboxes (on a very much larger scale than this), and we deliberatly make the gears soft. We case harden the gear teeth (about a few thousanths of an inch to get the wear resistance, but we want the core to be softer. What this gives you is the wear strength of the 'hard' materials coupled with ductility (or the resistance to fracture). A thru-hardened material will break very easily if fractured which could be caused by trapping material between the teeth or some type of impact, while a softer material will deflect and keep on working.

              I would expect the large grain alloy to be an aluminum alloy. There is no reason for the gearbox to be steel, it is only a support for the bearings. It's major function is to keep the bearings aligned, and doesn't need the strength of steel. By using steel, all you are doing is adding weight to the tool.

              Comment


              • #37
                Re: Opinion on 24V vs 18V drill sets

                DRC-Wartex;193341]
                Metals that are used for gears are low-grade steel (take one off the motor spindle from Bosch and one from a Ridgid drill, and then hammer it on an anvil, see what happens) and gearbox is some kind of soft, large-grain alloy. I'm not a fan of ridgid cordless tools
                because they are of mediocre quality
                Calder Re: Opinion on 24V vs 18V drill sets

                --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                I've just got to make this comment. It has been really bugging me as to what it means, and seems to have been referenced several times as a method of somehow evaluating how good the design of the too is:

                "Metals that are used for gears are low-grade steel (take one off the motor spindle from Bosch and one from a Ridgid drill, and then hammer it on an anvil, see what happens) and gearbox is some kind of soft, large-grain alloy." (DRC-Wartex, 12-11-2008).

                How can you tell the gears are low-grade steel by hammering it on an anvil. I assume the result was the gear was softer than others and bent when hammered. This is not an indication of low-grade steel, it is an indication that it is more ductile, and could show that some thought went went into the design. I have designed gearboxes (on a very much larger scale than this), and we deliberatly make the gears soft. We case harden the gear teeth (about a few thousanths of an inch to get the wear resistance, but we want the core to be softer. What this gives you is the wear strength of the 'hard' materials coupled with ductility (or the resistance to fracture). A thru-hardened material will break very easily if fractured which could be caused by trapping material between the teeth or some type of impact, while a softer material will deflect and keep on working.

                I would expect the large grain alloy to be an aluminum alloy. There is no reason for the gearbox to be steel, it is only a support for the bearings. It's major function is to keep the bearings aligned, and doesn't need the strength of steel. By using steel, all you are doing is adding weight to the tool.
                Thanks Calder. It is soooooo refreshing to get get true, educated, knowledgable input instead of the misleading, condesending, techno babble blah, blah, blah from Mr. Know it all. The truth will out in the end!
                Last edited by roadrashray; 12-16-2008, 05:26 PM.

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                • #38
                  Re: Opinion on 24V vs 18V drill sets

                  Sorry, just realized that I somehow ended up doing a double post of my big long one, when I did a correction. Sorry about that fellas.

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    Re: Opinion on 24V vs 18V drill sets

                    Originally posted by DRC-Wartex View Post
                    I strongly recommend to read up on people's experiences with Ridgid's warranty. Don't think Home Depot will just swap out tools for you. Prepare to mail tools and wait 2 months because some part is on backorder. Don't buy into it like other sheep.<snip>
                    Huh? That's exactly what I did just as I described here. My buddy dulled my $100 Ridgid 12" blade cutting the wrong material, I went to buy another and HD tool guy tells me "no just bring in dull blade we'll give you a new one - same for bits and batteries". I brought dull one back, give to return counter, get new blade, come back to return counter, they tell me "have a nice day" without even needing to see my receipt. I only ever had to swap that one thing so perhaps if I had an entire drill or compound saw to swap I would be faced with mailing, but my main concern are the more 'consumable' type things like blades/bits/batteries anyway, since these orange and grey marvels are built for way more abuse than I can even give. If that makes me a sheep, I'm "orange and grey all the way". Recently I find myself wondering what to do when older tools die in the wake of my Ridgid tools that just don't seem to die, like the pile of five Makita drills sitting in a bucket I'm too lazy to sell but can't stomach throwing away.

                    Back to the original topic (sort of), it was a bit disappointing recently when I lost my 24v XLI charger and I went to HD and all they had was 18V chargers and batts now. Don't yet know how the new 18V stuff compares but I'm sticking to the 24V.
                    Last edited by odditory; 12-16-2008, 07:21 PM.

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Re: Opinion on 24V vs 18V drill sets

                      Originally posted by DRC-Wartex View Post
                      Man, it was such an easy target, I just had to

                      It's a joke, I hope he doesn't take it seriously.
                      Doesn't really surprise me really, with that sort of comment - next thing he knows, though, he'll have F.L.A.G. knocking down his door to kick his butt.

                      Originally posted by DRC-Wartex View Post
                      I actually owned one and tested it versus Makita BHP451 and Dewalt DC925 in pressure treated lumber. Unlike you, mr canucksartech
                      Really? Really??!! Are you so sure about that? So you're presumably stating that I've never used those exact tools, to do my own comparisons? You apparently also now know what tools I've used and not used?? REALLY??!! 'Cause you might want to start double-thinking your posts before you let that mental-vomit out of your mouth.

                      Oh, poor, poor, hijacked thread.

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                      • #41
                        Re: Opinion on 24V vs 18V drill sets

                        Originally posted by odditory View Post
                        Also lets keep "people complaining on the internet about their bad experience" in perspective - people pipe up and get vocal when they want to complain, rather than when they want to share a good experience - so for every complaint there are many more in the 'silent majority' happily humming along.
                        Well put. And welcome to the forum, also (as chaotic as it may seem right now! ).

                        Comment


                        • #42
                          Re: Opinion on 24V vs 18V drill sets

                          I hope the LLSA works out for me if I ever need it; but it doesn't cover all the tools; and I am pretty darn sure you can't just swap out a dull drill bit or saw blade at HD. I think the orange apron might have led you astray. The first time, if you had the receipt and it was brand new, the person at the return counter probably just processed it as a regular RTV return, in which case the brand doesn't matter.

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                          • #43
                            Re: Opinion on 24V vs 18V drill sets

                            Originally posted by cpw View Post
                            I hope the LLSA works out for me if I ever need it; but it doesn't cover all the tools; and I am pretty darn sure you can't just swap out a dull drill bit or saw blade at HD. I think the orange apron might have led you astray. The first time, if you had the receipt and it was brand new, the person at the return counter probably just processed it as a regular RTV return, in which case the brand doesn't matter.
                            If LSA applied to accessories every contractor would use Ridgid blades exclusively and just swap them out infinitely. That would be sweet.


                            Originally posted by canucksartech
                            Doesn't really surprise me really, with that sort of comment - next thing he knows, though, he'll have F.L.A.G. knocking down his door to kick his butt.
                            When opposition's argument run dry, insults, provocateurism, subtle threats and ad hominem attacks roll in. One of my clanmates is gay and I have no problem with it, he is one of my best friends.


                            Calder: We are talking different scale and I'm sure you are also aware that most small stuff like this is just stamped, tempered (the whole thing), bathed in oil and then hot-fitted onto the motor shaft/sleeves without any "special" tooth-hardening process. I absolutely agree that it is a necessary and delicate process. Some cheapo tools manufacturers don't bother and use brass gears . You probably also know drills and impacts use planetary reduces, so the ring gear quality pretty much determines how long the gearbox lasts - this is where crap gets trapped in grease and mushed - crappy material = crappy drill. There also no bearings on planet gears, only brass sleeves (just took a Makita drill apart to verify), they sit on small shafts between 2 rings, only 1 bearing on the shaft that chuck sits on and one on the back side of the motor. Anything else just sits in holes stamped in metal rings or milled in the gearbox metal. Without any bearings. I personally ground a corded Metabo SDS hammer (rotary) to a point where everything just became a mush. Shaft holes became oval and at some point the angle between the adjacent gears was so high that they just got ripped right out.

                            This is an exploded view of a Bosch drill http://www.mtmc.co.uk/prodtype.asp?PT_ID=12726821

                            I'm just posting this so guys can see what's inside. As you can see there is only one ball bearing in the whole thing.

                            There is no way I believe TTI uses the same grade metals as big brands. You can argue that all you want.

                            I have a feeling that unless I praise Ridgid 100% of the time on this forum, fanboys can't relate to me and that makes me a bad person. I have at least 5 different brands of tools (and I have a lot of tools) and I like them all equally. God fgrbid I mention any one is better, then I'm "selling".

                            I'm done with this thread. Thanks to everybody who provided constructive criticism and good info.

                            Comment


                            • #44
                              Re: Opinion on 24V vs 18V drill sets

                              For sure 18V! Although I have used the Rigid drills before - I kept buying the Makita's whenever I could. I find that having the same line of drills around is easier.
                              Check out this review for a hammer driver drill.
                              http://mymilescity.com/diy-miscellan...mer_drill.html
                              Measure TWICE - Cut ONCE! 'Cause the Lumber Stretcher is broken!
                              I'd throw more things away, but I'm afraid someone might want them...
                              My DIY and HOW To Articles and Videos

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                              • #45
                                Re: Opinion on 24V vs 18V drill sets

                                Originally posted by canucksartech View Post
                                Sorry, just realized that I somehow ended up doing a double post of my big long one, when I did a correction. Sorry about that fellas.
                                I actually was let down when I realized it was the same post. I was thinking wow, lets set canucksartech off more often this is fun!

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