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Opinion on 24V vs 18V drill sets

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  • Opinion on 24V vs 18V drill sets

    Looking for opinions on which to keep. I foresee myself eventually doing
    some drywall install installation and more flooring installs. I will also
    be doing some limited mixing of mortar for ceramic flooring installs. The
    drills are probably my deciding factor as that is what I will use the most.
    Hopefully some of you have used heavier and smaller drills for larger
    projects and can comment on if it makes much of a difference. Also: how
    useful is a reciprocating saw? I decided to go with Rigid as they have
    lifetime warranty bumper to bumper including batteries.
    Kit #1: Rigid XLI 24volt Drill, reciprocating saw, light, 2 batteries,
    price $200
    Pros:
    cheaper cost
    usefulness of reciprocating saw???
    more torque
    seems tougher built
    batteries have indicator lights as to how much charge remains
    has hammer mode on drill (not sure how useful this would be for me)
    Negatives:
    Drill is 2 lbs more in weight than the other drill
    http://www.homedepot.ca/webapp/wcs/s...k=P_PartNumber
    Kit #2, Rigid 18v drill, radio, light, and impact wrench, 2 batteries.
    price $239
    This is the drill that comes with the kit:
    http://www.homedepot.ca/webapp/wcs/s...k=P_PartNumber
    Pros:
    2 lbs lighter that the other drill
    drill has built in light (not sure about how useful this is)
    "Auto-shift" functionality is supposed to gear up/down to prevent stripping
    of screws
    Negatives:
    seems not quite as solidly built
    less torque
    no battery remaining indicator

  • #2
    Re: Opinion on 24V vs 18V drill sets

    I say go with the 24v set for that price. I have them and they work very well. The drill is a little heavy, but it's not a big deal unless your working overhead.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Opinion on 24V vs 18V drill sets

      I strongly recommend to read up on people's experiences with Ridgid's warranty. Don't think Home Depot will just swap out tools for you. Prepare to mail tools and wait 2 months because some part is on backorder. Don't buy into it like other sheep.

      Also, if you are planning to use the drill to mix mud, I can tell you right now that you will damage your motor, batteries and even the gearbox.

      The only 2 drills that can handle mud mixing in lowest gear are 36v Dewalt and 36v Bosch, and that still puts a lot of strain on them.
      Last edited by DRC-Wartex; 12-11-2008, 12:51 AM.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Opinion on 24V vs 18V drill sets

        I did have to take my tools in for service once. Both batteries had to be replaced. It only took two weeks, not two months. And I didn't have to mail anything. I had a Dewalt drill that took a crap on me when it was about six months old. Took them over a week to get it back to me, so two weeks is acceptable. It seems to depend alot on the service center as far as how long it takes.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Opinion on 24V vs 18V drill sets

          Originally posted by Hottrodd View Post
          I did have to take my tools in for service once. Both batteries had to be replaced. It only took two weeks, not two months. And I didn't have to mail anything. I had a Dewalt drill that took a crap on me when it was about six months old. Took them over a week to get it back to me, so two weeks is acceptable. It seems to depend alot on the service center as far as how long it takes.
          I agree with DRC's post. on all his points.
          My service ctr. issues are not the same. More on that as I go on.

          The 24V kit would be better if you want Ridgid. Any max select model is not going to be performing well on any 18v battery except the planner seems to be the same as an 18v model. So if you have those tools too, buy the 24V kit. I did reluctantly buy a 24V, 2 batt/hmr-drill kit kit for $120 on "cyber Mon sale at HD.com. because I am stuck with poor performing max select tools that need 24V to run anywhere near their full speed . I have waited about 1 year for the 24v batteries to be on sale.
          The kit you speak of is $300 in our HD so $200 is a very good price. I do not like the Recip saw , I prefer my Milwaukees ,so for me the drill kit at $120 was what I wanted.
          The drill seems well made ,heavy[most Ridgid cordless tools are], chuck was stuck until I put some teflon lube in it and worked it by hand to fix it, and none of the usual runout. Same one on my LocTor Milwaukee, all metal type single sleeve.
          Compared to the DW925 ;3 speed it is not as good though , that is the best HD cordless drill I have ever used, the best chuck even over my Milwaukee's and it tested the best too in TOTT test, but I needed the 24V batteries and since at the lowest price of $99 [clearance sale last year] regular price now is $200 for 1 battery starter [actually shoul be called a non starter for consumers] kit the price was right.
          Service ctr. for me would be 3hr round trip at best in the LA area which is bad so I would have to ship it. HD should allow you to send them in through them since they have a lock on the brand, and they killed the service ctr. network for the most part in my area, but they do not. The LSA is a bust as far as I am concerned, I have service ctrs. for any other brand within minutes of my location except for Ridgid. They all are now non Ridgid repair ctrs. since the TTI buyout.
          I would seriously consider that first. Some have reported having to send in an entire kit for 1 battery failure! for any LSA work. That would be fine, I have better tools anyway to use, except I would have to pay for shipping an entire 8 pc. kit for example.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Opinion on 24V vs 18V drill sets

            I'd go with the 24 volt kit at that price as you should get better run times and performance from the tools and those you'd probably add later on.

            Also, Andrew, glad to hear that you got your 24 volt batteries that you were looking for at a decent price and they are covered by the LSA as they were purchased in kit form. I know you purchased the 8 pc kit, as did I. Now those 1.9ah NiCad batteries that came with it make some sense in the low draw tools and those times that you need a short term large current draw from the NiCads that you can't get from the Lithiums.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Opinion on 24V vs 18V drill sets

              Originally posted by drill newbie View Post
              Looking for opinions on which to keep. I foresee myself eventually doing
              some drywall install installation and more flooring installs. I will also
              be doing some limited mixing of mortar for ceramic flooring installs. The
              drills are probably my deciding factor as that is what I will use the most.
              Hopefully some of you have used heavier and smaller drills for larger
              projects and can comment on if it makes much of a difference. Also: how
              useful is a reciprocating saw? I decided to go with Rigid as they have
              lifetime warranty bumper to bumper including batteries.

              Pros:
              2 lbs lighter that the other drill
              drill has built in light (not sure about how useful this is)
              "Auto-shift" functionality is supposed to gear up/down to prevent stripping
              of screws
              Negatives:
              seems not quite as solidly built
              less torque
              no battery remaining indicator
              IMO the price for the 24V is great but the tool weight for drywall work is not. In the US 18V Li batteries are available alone while the 24V are not. All of my Ridgid power tools have been reliable and I have not "tested" the LSA yet but at least I know the battery is "covered" at the minimum. All batteries will fail eventually no matter the brand which is one of the reasons why I used to discard power tools in the past. If I was in the market for a cordless drill I would consider the new X3 lineup that claims to have improvements in torque, weight, size and ergonomics plus lithium power. I recommend getting a good CORDED power tool to perform mud mixing and lightweight cordless power tools for drywall projects among other things.
              Last edited by reConx; 12-11-2008, 04:15 PM. Reason: clarity

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Opinion on 24V vs 18V drill sets

                Originally posted by DRC-Wartex View Post
                I strongly recommend to read up on people's experiences with Ridgid's warranty. Don't think Home Depot will just swap out tools for you. Prepare to mail tools and wait 2 months because some part is on backorder. Don't buy into it like other sheep.

                Also, if you are planning to use the drill to mix mud, I can tell you right now that you will damage your motor, batteries and even the gearbox.

                The only 2 drills that can handle mud mixing in lowest gear are 36v Dewalt and 36v Bosch, and that still puts a lot of strain on them.
                You seem to be a fairly intelligent though a somewhat rude and obnoxious individual. There are many people in this forum who have made the decision to purchase Ridgid power tools and have used them extensively with little or no problems. There are others who have had a problem with Ridgid tools and have had positive experiances with the repairs. Yes, there have been some number of posts from people who have had problems getting them repaired. Some of those no doubt may be totaly the fault of the process set up by Ridgid. Some seem to be individuals who chose not to follow the registration proceedure or took them back to HD for repair or simply have unreasonable expectations. Many of the complaining posts seem so similar in composition that they look suspiciously like plants from some competitor agents.
                Some posters like yourself sell other power tool brands from a website hyperlinked to their posts which dilutes their brand opinions.
                One can easily assume that with 2500 stores in the US and Canada Home Depot sells millions of Ridgid power tools per year. Therefor the relatively few complaints that show up on this Ridgid forum would seem to be of minimal consequence. I think it shows confidence in their products that Ridgid would operate this forum which allows people with disparite and not always honest agenda's to shoot at them and their products.
                Does this mean that Ridgid always provides the best products and the perfect product support? Of course not. The My Ebox system was very poorly designed in comparison to contemporary software and unfortunately it's replacement seems to have been launched while still in a Beta state. Ridgid is attempting something unique with it's LLSA and some reports would indicate some problems. Ridgid has made a major investment in their marketing plan and I would believe that they are suffering normal teething problems and will get things straightened out in a resonable period. As I stated earlier in this post many people have purchased Ridgid power tool products and have enjoyed good performance. We are a contractor and have purchased tens of thousands of dollars of power tools in the last twenty years. We have extensive experiance with virtually all brands and have evolved through the cordless tool era from the early 9.6V Makita's and the 14V DeWalts to our current concentration on Ridgid. Our purchasing decisions are hard nosed and based on a combination of price and performance criteria. We made the decision to concentrate on Ridgid power tools two years ago primarily due to the LLSA, Ridgid's quality reputation, Home Depot's strong customer service performance, and Ridgid's pricing which has always been very favorable compared to the other quality professional tool manufacturers. We have purchased in excess of sixty Ridgid power tools over the last two years and work them hard every day in very demanding conditions and have not experianced a single failure. Some of the Ridgid tools are truely superior, some are average and some are less than the competition in performance, which is what I would expect out of a line of tools from any manufacturer. I also expect to experiance tool failures due to manufacturing defects or simple wear and tear at some point. I believe and would hope that the repair experiance would be positive.
                Soooooooo to have someone who operates a hyperlink to his tool sales site come on this forum and state that people who decide to purchase Ridgid tools are "sheep" only continues to demonstrate the continuing condesending and superior attitude you have demonstrated on this forum over the last few months. My guess is that you have no more personal knowledge of the Ridgid repair experiance than I do. Your statement that a person should "Prepare to mail tools and wait 2 months because some part is on backorder" is obviously stated to put Ridgid in a negative light so they might purchase whatever brand you are selling. It is very obvious that you have a a competent grasp of technical issues, especially pertaining to electrical and battery items. Unfortunately the positive aspects of your technical contributions are offset by your bias and rude and boorish comments......Ray
                Last edited by roadrashray; 12-11-2008, 01:49 PM.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Opinion on 24V vs 18V drill sets

                  Originally posted by drill newbie View Post
                  Looking for opinions on which to keep. I foresee myself eventually doing
                  some drywall install installation and more flooring installs. I will also
                  be doing some limited mixing of mortar for ceramic flooring installs. The
                  drills are probably my deciding factor as that is what I will use the most.
                  Hopefully some of you have used heavier and smaller drills for larger
                  projects and can comment on if it makes much of a difference. Also: how
                  useful is a reciprocating saw? I decided to go with Rigid as they have
                  lifetime warranty bumper to bumper including batteries.
                  Kit #1: Rigid XLI 24volt Drill, reciprocating saw, light, 2 batteries,
                  price $200
                  Pros:
                  cheaper cost
                  usefulness of reciprocating saw???
                  more torque
                  seems tougher built
                  batteries have indicator lights as to how much charge remains
                  has hammer mode on drill (not sure how useful this would be for me)
                  Negatives:
                  Drill is 2 lbs more in weight than the other drill
                  http://www.homedepot.ca/webapp/wcs/s...k=P_PartNumber
                  Kit #2, Rigid 18v drill, radio, light, and impact wrench, 2 batteries.
                  price $239
                  This is the drill that comes with the kit:
                  http://www.homedepot.ca/webapp/wcs/s...k=P_PartNumber
                  Pros:
                  2 lbs lighter that the other drill
                  drill has built in light (not sure about how useful this is)
                  "Auto-shift" functionality is supposed to gear up/down to prevent stripping
                  of screws
                  Negatives:
                  seems not quite as solidly built
                  less torque
                  no battery remaining indicator
                  Welcome to the forum. Sorry I jumped into your thread with a rant. Now on to your questions.........
                  1- Mixing mud.....We have a lot of cordless tools however due to the power required we always use an old Milwaukee CORDED drill when mixing mud. I have no experiance with the 36V tools, however many posts I have seen would indicate others with experiance continue to recommend corded drills for this application.
                  2-Drywall fastening.....If you are doing alot the recommendation is a corded drywall screwgun which is simply a far superior performer to any cordless tool. We use cordless impact tools occaisionaly for short jobs. If I were choosing a tool for DIY work I would probably would purchase a impact tool for this purpose unless I was doing most of a house.
                  3-Cordless reciprocating saws are very handy for demo work,tree trimming, and any cut which requires a reach or where nails, screws, concrete of other metal might be involved. They are very handy. Reciprocating saws are indespensable for professional contractors and the current crop of cordless saws are so efficient that we seldom pull the old corded milwaukee out of the case any more.
                  Sooooooooo for the tool recommendations based on your stated purposes.....
                  1-corded drill for mixing mud.
                  2-18V cordless drill and impact tool combo for all around general purpose drilling and screwing. I couldn't recommend the Ridgid set for this as the auto shift is so new that it might have problems that haven't been exposed yet and I question the utility of auto shift. We use the ridgid 18V impact and Ridgid MaxSelect impact at work and the 18V impact is a sub standard performer and the 24V MaxSelect is only adaquate. Personal use and test results at Tools on Line indicate the Makita is a superior performer and you might try the Makita 18V drill/impact combo set. I have mixed emotions with this recommendation because we have several of the Ridgid 18V compact drills which I feel are excellant tools and of course the LLSA is important, however the Ridgid 18V impact and the MaxSelect impact are such poor performers I can't recommend them. The Makita 18V recip and circ saws are adaquate performers also.
                  3-24V tools.....For the uses you describe I wouldn't recommend them. The 24V hammer drill which we have a couple of is very powerfull, however it is so heavy that it's general utility is low. It also doesn't have a light which is a great feature as it is very common to find ourselves working in dark areas where the feature is very usable. I believe the Makita has a light which can be switched before the trigger which would be a nice feature because many times the light is handy for finding the drill point in the dark.
                  Good luck and let us know what you decide on and how they work out regardless of brand. Thats how this forum works.......Ray
                  Last edited by roadrashray; 12-11-2008, 03:15 PM.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Opinion on 24V vs 18V drill sets

                    RRRay,

                    Just an aside regarding the impact drivers. I have two of the 18v Ridgid impact drivers and have run them on the 1.5 ah Lithiums and the 3.0 ah Lithiums. What I found out is that on larger lags or bolts on hold downs, etc. when I really need to have work performed and quickly, I use one of the 18 volt NiCads as they seem to allow more amperage pull from the batteries than will the Lithium batteries. The Lithium batteries have just too much current monitoring circuitry that just won't allow the amount of power the impacts need. What's your thoughts? Have you run into that situation with the impacts? It gets the job done faster, but the battery runtime is definitely decreased and with some greater weight.
                    Last edited by Spinalzo; 12-11-2008, 05:57 PM. Reason: Spelling

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Opinion on 24V vs 18V drill sets

                      Ray, first of all I'd like to mention my site is an online community and not a sales portal in any way, shape or form. So your accent on me attacking Ridgid based on brand bias is totally false. I post power tool reviews because I'm a tool geek, and there are maybe 20 tool topics out of 20,000 others. I do sell tools as a "side job" and deal with pretty much all brands and if you actually read my site you will see I'm not biased towards any brand in terms of tool quality. I DO think that Dewalt's NANO batteries are far, far superior to anything on the market today due to unique chemistry developed by MIT. I think Makita's engineering is superior to Dewalt's. Lastly, I speak of power tools only and not of any other gear they make. I never said ridgid tools are all bad.

                      Ridgid uses Moli Energy cells which are not suitable for power tools and have a very short life span. How would you feel if you knew your car's engine pistons were made of lead instead of steel? That's a stab in consumer's back. Bosch has no problems using cells from the same manufacturer as Makita, and they don't cost more than Molis.

                      Metals that are used for gears are low-grade steel (take one off the motor spindle from Bosch and one from a Ridgid drill, and then hammer it on an anvil, see what happens) and gearbox is some kind of soft, large-grain alloy. I'm not a fan of ridgid cordless tools
                      (plumbing gear is great) because they are of mediocre quality and TTI capitalizes on a fact that their manufacturing costs are half of Dewalt/Makita/Bosch *BUT* their tools cost just a quarter less.

                      First of all, you have to remember that there are a lot of power tools that Ridgid doesn't make, that are made for them by Metabo or somebody else. All these tools contribute absolutely nothing to Ridgid's reputation on the market as there is ZERO R&D and materials (besides orange plastic) in them. So you can't say "well I used a Ridgid grinder heavily and it stood up so I think Ridgid makes good tools".

                      I agree that a lot of people do not follow warranty rules and abuse tools and then demand magic from the manufacturers. These are not the people I'm talking about. I'm talking about contractors who follow every step and then get screwed because Ridgid is too disorganized to process the claim in a timely fashion. If somebody happens to live within 5 miles of the service centere and their particular problem was fixed is not an indicator of quality of service. I higly doubt Ridgid will pay for shipping a drill from Nova Scotia to Quebec to process LSA. Yes they might be having backorder problems due to increased demand, etc etc, you must remember that consumer absolutely doesn't care about this. Point is, on a global scale, that Ridgid's warranty service is 3 out of 5 stars compared to any other major brand, and they do nothing to fix it.

                      I'm in Canada and their service centers are nowhere to be found here, there maybe like 7 in entire country, and we are talking 30 millions and growing. And yet every home depot is pushing their tools on unsuspecting customers at every opportunity. I've been to at least 4 stores and more than half of hardware reps think HD owns Ridgid.

                      Point is, Ridgids power tools have a market, that is tradesmen and DIYers, and it's a very narrow niche that is easily to fill. But when it comes to heavy duty, everyday construction, Ridgids (Again, I'm not talking about their plumbing tools or outsourced tools) tools do not stand a chance against any major brand in terms of longevity for the money. In such terms Ryobi makes a better purchasing decision.

                      I make recommendations solely on this principle. If the guy is going to mix mud with his drill, Ridgid WILL burn out and he won't be able to claim warranty, thus losing money because they will see damaged commutator, windings, molten impressions in the casing around the motor etc. I'm trying to be realistic when it comes to tools. Making cabinets? Ridgid 18v li-ion drill will do. Drilling concrete? Only 36v Dewalt, Hilti or Bosch. Putting up metal siding or HVAC? Makita 18v li-ion impacts. Demolishing? 28v Milwaukee recip.

                      This is what I think.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Opinion on 24V vs 18V drill sets

                        Originally posted by Spinalzo View Post
                        RRRay,

                        Just an aside regarding the impact drivers. I have two of the 18v Ridgid impact drivers and have run them on the 1.5 ah Lithiums and the 3.0 ah Lithiums. What I found out is that on larger lags or bolts on hold downs, etc. when I really need to have work performed and quickly, I use one of the 18 volt NiCads as they seem to allow more amperage pull from the batteries than will the Lithium batteries. The Lithium batteries have just too much current monitoring circuitry that just won't allow the amount of power the impacts need. What's your thoughts? Have you run into that situation with the impacts? It gets the job done faster, but the battery runtime is definitely decreased and with some greater weight.
                        Spin.....We only have 18V 1.5Ah LI batts and the 2.5 NiCads so I can't comment on the 18V 3.0 LI's. I also have never used the Nicads in the impact tools. They are such poor performers that we always use the 24V LI's to get any speed. Actually the 14.4V ridgid impacts are the star performers of the group. They will run a 4" screw in while the 24V is rattling around and getting ready to go. It's astounding the advantage they have. A look at the specs provides a clue with the much faster rpm. I'll have to give the 18V Nicads a try and see what happens. Unfortunately the Makita 18V LI impact at half the weight is a better performer as the recent test in Tools on Line demonstrates.....Ray

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Opinion on 24V vs 18V drill sets

                          Originally posted by DRC-Wartex View Post
                          Ray, first of all I'd like to mention my site is an online community and not a sales portal in any way, shape or form. So your accent on me attacking Ridgid based on brand bias is totally false. I post power tool reviews because I'm a tool geek, and there are maybe 20 tool topics out of 20,000 others. I do sell tools as a "side job" and deal with pretty much all brands and if you actually read my site you will see I'm not biased towards any brand in terms of tool quality. I DO think that Dewalt's NANO batteries are far, far superior to anything on the market today due to unique chemistry developed by MIT. I think Makita's engineering is superior to Dewalt's. Lastly, I speak of power tools only and not of any other gear they make. I never said ridgid tools are all bad.

                          Ridgid uses Moli Energy cells which are not suitable for power tools and have a very short life span. How would you feel if you knew your car's engine pistons were made of lead instead of steel? That's a stab in consumer's back. Bosch has no problems using cells from the same manufacturer as Makita, and they don't cost more than Molis.

                          Metals that are used for gears are low-grade steel (take one off the motor spindle from Bosch and one from a Ridgid drill, and then hammer it on an anvil, see what happens) and gearbox is some kind of soft, large-grain alloy. I'm not a fan of ridgid cordless tools
                          (plumbing gear is great) because they are of mediocre quality and TTI capitalizes on a fact that their manufacturing costs are half of Dewalt/Makita/Bosch *BUT* their tools cost just a quarter less.

                          First of all, you have to remember that there are a lot of power tools that Ridgid doesn't make, that are made for them by Metabo or somebody else. All these tools contribute absolutely nothing to Ridgid's reputation on the market as there is ZERO R&D and materials (besides orange plastic) in them. So you can't say "well I used a Ridgid grinder heavily and it stood up so I think Ridgid makes good tools".

                          I agree that a lot of people do not follow warranty rules and abuse tools and then demand magic from the manufacturers. These are not the people I'm talking about. I'm talking about contractors who follow every step and then get screwed because Ridgid is too disorganized to process the claim in a timely fashion. If somebody happens to live within 5 miles of the service centere and their particular problem was fixed is not an indicator of quality of service. I higly doubt Ridgid will pay for shipping a drill from Nova Scotia to Quebec to process LSA. Yes they might be having backorder problems due to increased demand, etc etc, you must remember that consumer absolutely doesn't care about this. Point is, on a global scale, that Ridgid's warranty service is 3 out of 5 stars compared to any other major brand, and they do nothing to fix it.

                          I'm in Canada and their service centers are nowhere to be found here, there maybe like 7 in entire country, and we are talking 30 millions and growing. And yet every home depot is pushing their tools on unsuspecting customers at every opportunity. I've been to at least 4 stores and more than half of hardware reps think HD owns Ridgid.

                          Point is, Ridgids power tools have a market, that is tradesmen and DIYers, and it's a very narrow niche that is easily to fill. But when it comes to heavy duty, everyday construction, Ridgids (Again, I'm not talking about their plumbing tools or outsourced tools) tools do not stand a chance against any major brand in terms of longevity for the money. In such terms Ryobi makes a better purchasing decision.

                          I make recommendations solely on this principle. If the guy is going to mix mud with his drill, Ridgid WILL burn out and he won't be able to claim warranty, thus losing money because they will see damaged commutator, windings, molten impressions in the casing around the motor etc. I'm trying to be realistic when it comes to tools. Making cabinets? Ridgid 18v li-ion drill will do. Drilling concrete? Only 36v Dewalt, Hilti or Bosch. Putting up metal siding or HVAC? Makita 18v li-ion impacts. Demolishing? 28v Milwaukee recip.

                          This is what I think.
                          Blah, blah, blah........I have no desire to get into an argument with you regarding tool, R&D, design issues, quality claims because who cares what you think or claim to know. Smash the gears with a hammer indeed? I mean come on!
                          We don't take tools apart and perform cute little bench testing, gear smashing tricks. What we do is load up our trucks every day and go out to job sites. with the emphasis on getting the job done we abuse our tools every day.
                          We use power tools in driving rain and carelessly lay them in snow. We run drills with large holecut saws until they are so hot you can't hold the case without burning your hand. We run impacts until they are burning hot also and they get covered with drywall mud ouside and no doubt inside. we run batteries until they are so depleted they won't operate the light and they are so hot you need a glove to remove them. All these tools are used in mud, wet sawdust, concrete wet and dry and every abusive environment you can think of because they must get the job done. We have dropped drills and impacts from ladders 10-15' onto concrete floors and they continue to run. we drop circ saws which bends the shoe and cracks the housing, then hammer the shoe back level and put the tool back to work. We have tools with cracks in the casing and all sorts of cosmetic ills that would give the average DIYer or power tool designer a heart attack. Our tools, simply put are purchased and used to get a job done. We don't polish them, or have them all hung neatly on pegs on a shop wall. They are used and abused every day and thrown into a soggy bag and piled in among tool crushing heavy oblects in the back of pickup trucks where they rest overnight to be pulled out the next day and abused all over again. Thats the way we and most general contrators use tools. If they don't hold up we repair or buy new. If we don't get expected performance out of tools we simply don't purchase more of them. We share our tool experiances with other users both professional and weekenders. We don't have an agenda. It doesn't matter what brand we use. If the experiance is positive, we share it, if it's negative we also inform people. "Experts" might provide a whole bunch of technical claims about battery technology and tell us that our batteries won't last. We use and abuse Ridgid LI batts every day and some of them are now two years old and they continue to get pulled out of the bag and perform every day. We have used every brand of power tool over the years, Dewalt, Makita, Porter Cable, Delta, Bosch et all. We've broken them and torn them down and seen how they are built and repaired them and compared the quality of parts and design and manufacture. Our experiance with Ridgid would indicate they are in the same catagory as most of the other professional power tool mfgrs. Since we have had no failures after two years I can't comment on the quality of gears compared to DeWalt or Milwaukee tools we have had apart, however that fact might be a quality statement in itself.
                          The simple truth is I don't trust you. You make outragous claims indicating the most intimate knowledge of manufacturer's design parameters, R&D, and manufacturing specifications from factories half a world away. You continue to claim no bias against Ridgid, yet continue to make uninformed ridiculous claims of their infiority. I'll bet we use more power tools in a week than you do in a year. We know the truth of quality from extensive experiance. You babble about design theory and smashing gears. The simple truth is, there is theory and there is the real world of use and experiance. Your outragous denegration of Ridgid power tool products and their 'sheep' users reveals your condesending nature.
                          You HAVE offered to sell tools in posts on this forum so you are funtioning as a competitor regardless of what claims you make about your web site. The web site offers tools for sale and we have no knowledge of what financial relationships you have with those sellers, however I know it isn't out of the kindness of your heart.
                          In closing I really don't care about your misleading and outlandish claims regarding tool design knowledge et all. I am however offended by your demeaning references to others sharing this forum ie: all Home Depot people are "idiots", Ridgid tool buyers are 'sheep" and other negative references to people I'm sure you feel are beneath you intellectually.
                          I know that many forums have a certain contingent that revels in using demeaning and insulting language in reference to other participants. I would suggest that a quick purusal would demonstrate to you that such behavior is rare and unusual on this forum. On this forum such behaior is considered boorish!
                          That's what I think.....Ray

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Opinion on 24V vs 18V drill sets

                            Originally posted by Spinalzo View Post
                            RRRay,

                            Just an aside regarding the impact drivers. I have two of the 18v Ridgid impact drivers and have run them on the 1.5 ah Lithiums and the 3.0 ah Lithiums. What I found out is that on larger lags or bolts on hold downs, etc. when I really need to have work performed and quickly, I use one of the 18 volt NiCads as they seem to allow more amperage pull from the batteries than will the Lithium batteries. The Lithium batteries have just too much current monitoring circuitry that just won't allow the amount of power the impacts need. What's your thoughts? Have you run into that situation with the impacts? It gets the job done faster, but the battery runtime is definitely decreased and with some greater weight.
                            I usually use my older 12v Makita impacts(Japan).
                            The 18v nicad in the 18v[not max select] Ridgid seem to work fine but heavy. I do not know if Ray is referring to the max select which is bad on 18v batts. I have a Milwaukee 18v impact gun, 1/2" SD that will take lugs off my f350 if you really want cordless to drive a lag screw that will do it.
                            The 1/4" QD are not that great for heavy lag screws, a 3/8" SD or 7/16"QD is better. Milwaukee makes both.

                            Cordless and mixing mud, I would not do that with any Ridgid cordless, maybe the other Manuf.'s 36v tools.
                            Drywall,the DW screw gun I have is OK for 1 5/8" screws, 12V, but I prefer a corded one for any larger projects. I have a senco drive attm. on a Bosch gun,2500rpm, and a 4500rpm Makita.

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                            • #15
                              Re: Opinion on 24V vs 18V drill sets

                              Originally posted by roadrashray View Post
                              You HAVE offered to sell tools in posts on this forum so you are funtioning as a competitor regardless of what claims you make about your web site. The web site offers tools for sale and we have no knowledge of what financial relationships you have with those sellers, however I know it isn't out of the kindness of your heart.
                              LMFAO

                              Man you are so full of it it's amazing. I'm not even going to argue about this. I'll let other forum members check out my site for themselves if they care and decide whether I'm a secret corporate Makita/Bosch/Dewalt/Fluke/Hilti/Greenlee/Klein/Hitachi (LMAO!) sales guy or just a power tool geek.

                              I'm very happy Ridgid worked out for you and your crew. We disagree on quality and you get so worked up about it it's amazing.

                              I went to a university that was really heavy on math, physics and computer science. Whatever claims I make are based on my personal discoveries that I try to make as much as possible scientifically accurate. I don't buy things on "faith" and abolish all scientific evidence because "it works for me". My coworker uses Ryobi exclusively and loves it. Whenever push comes to shove he reaches for my "brand" tools. He would never buy anything but Ryobi. It works for him but it doesn't make it a great tool. Look at multiple reviews online that people posted AFTER they used the tool and you will see that Ridgid is NOT on par with other brands when it comes to cordless stuff. It's a fact. They might be getting there, but for today Ridgid is still a second choice. I'm not saying Ridgid makes outright crap, I'm just saying they cut corners.

                              And you can't seem to understand this concept.

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