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  • Rigid VS ryobi

    I have been through three sets of the 18v ryobi tools (the one+ sets) in the past few years. The first two were the original set and the newest one is only a few months old and its the lithium Ion. The newest set seems to be breaking now. The battery charges but doesnt seem to get a full charge and the red light on the charger blinks indicating defective battery (I say "the battery" because some *** stole my other battery and the flashlight). Anyway, I think I am about done with ryobi. Are the rigid tools any better? I know they are both made by the same company so I am kinda unsure. One of the big plusses of the one plus is all of the tools that I have that work with it, but at this point I am about ready to throw them all away.

  • #2
    Re: Rigid VS ryobi

    Ridgid is better. I had a Ryobi jigsaw. Worked ok when it was new, but started to break after just a few months. I replaced it with the 24v ridgid and it's a night and day difference. Ryobi is ok for occasional home use, but not heavy construction.

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    • #3
      Re: Rigid VS ryobi

      I'm a homeowner/DIY'r and even I find Ridgid to be much better than Ryobi. The quality of construction and durability of my Ridgid 18volt tools compared to that ofthe Ryobi I also own is easy to see. The Ryobi have been good for lighter jobs and as backups. I have been impressed with the Ryobi lithium batteries except when the temperature drops. I have a feelng Ridgid lithiums might have the same problem, these batteries do not like the cold.

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      • #4
        Re: Rigid VS ryobi

        +1 that RIDGID is better.
        Teach your kids about taxes..........eat 30 percent of their ice cream.

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        • #5
          Re: Rigid VS ryobi

          I used some Ryobi 18V NiCad tools a few years ago and the experience wasn't very positive. We were doing a deck job and the drill overheated very quickly and the batteries didn't last very long. The trigger on the drill quickly became an off-on switch and the drill didn't have a break which made it very difficult to use driving deck screws. due to weak batteries the recip and circ saws were worthless. I had assumed Ryobi had probably improved over the years however have no personal knowledge. I have seen some positive posts on this forum however your experiance doesn't sound to good.
          We are a contractor and have over 60 Ridgid power tools and use them and abuse them hard every day. We have tools in all voltages including 24 and 18V LI, 18, 14.4 and 9.6V Nicad. We have had no failures in two years of hard work and the tools perform as well as all the other professional grade products we have used over the years. With the singular exception of the MaxSelect impact tool they are all good performers. The impact tool is very poor compared to Makita's we have used and even compared to the Ridgid 14.4 impact we have. To date the experiance has been positive and I don't hesitate to recommend them.......Ray

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          • #6
            Re: Rigid VS ryobi

            Franki,

            You're right that the Nicad suck for some things; but there are a bunch of Ryobi tools that lithium really breathes new life into. I can't comment on any saw; because I never used them with nicad, but the two biggest examples I can think of are the RA drill and Rotozip clone. With Nicad they are not that great, but with Ryobi lithium they both work really well for me. The Rotozip/Circular saws do eat through even the lithium batteries thoguh. I can drill or drive for a few hours on a single lithium charge however; so for homeowner use I don't see anything wrong with Ryobi lithium as far as function. Time will tell as far as durability, but both my drills have taken a number of tumbles from a ladder and are no worse off for it [it is kind of annoying that the Husky ladder I bought has no paint try or hole in the top to fit a drill chuck].

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            • #7
              Re: Rigid VS ryobi

              Ryobi I use them as backup or to lend out. The 1 + batts are better than the older ones, 1.8Ah I think.. The 8.25" miter saw is actually very good, but they do not sell it anymore. I use it on special occasions like doing some trim work on a pitched roof. I have the older jig saw before they went to bare tools, and it has worked fine,the Ridgid 18v is much better. The newer tools,jig saw for example is now lighter, appear to be not as well made, others too ,in some cases. They are better than Skill, B&D, in that price range. DIY user only or as a disposable if it breaks I guess.

              BTW the $34 blue BF Werner fiberglass ladder from Lowe's is excellent, has that access. type top for paint trays, tools etc.They sell a contractor Werner which is very nice and has a lot of special features but it is $140. I have a Husky ladder top tool box/tray that will fit over the top of a step ladder. You may want to buy that.

              On the Li. batt. issue here is an article.
              http://electronics.howstuffworks.com...on-battery.htm

              not sure if this is true, I have cell phone batteries that still chg. and are about 5 years old.
              • "They start degrading as soon as they leave the factory. They will only last two or three years from the date of manufacture whether you use them or not."
              Last edited by Andrew M.; 12-15-2008, 11:54 AM.

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              • #8
                Re: Rigid VS ryobi

                Originally posted by cpw View Post
                [it is kind of annoying that the Husky ladder I bought has no paint try or hole in the top to fit a drill chuck].
                Hey CPW, they do sell a little thing at Home Depot that might come in useful for you. They have an accessory/storage tray that fits onto the side of mostly all a-frame step ladders (if that's the type ladder you're talking about). It's an orange plastic/nylon composite-type material that it's made of. It fits onto the side of the ladder, snugly onto the two rails, and working with the a-frame's angle. It has a whole bunch of accessory holes, and actually has a molded-in resession into the base of it to snugly secure a 1-gallon paint can. I have one of these (cost around $9, I think), but unfortunately I don't have a SKU or picture for you. They're a very useful little accessory, and seem to be quite common at mostly all HD's in the 'States. I'm sure if you ask any orange apron, they'll be able to look for one for you - they're usually in a little display over by the ladders.

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                • #9
                  Re: Rigid VS ryobi

                  I have several "corded" Ryobi tools and have no problem with them. But when it comes to "cordless" I've read so many posts about bad batteries and chargers (and NOT just Ryobi), that I put off buying any "cordless" until Ridgid announced it's Limited Lifetime Service Agreement (which covers batteries and chargers) a few years ago.

                  Now I own several "cordless" Ridgid tools and have yet to have a battery or charger failure of anykind although some of these tools are now approaching four years old. As a home owner who might not use a tool every week, I realize that idle NiCad batteries generally will not last as long as those that get used often. For me, buying a cordless of any brand would be an ongoing expense for batteries, without LLSA coverage. Thus Ridgid, is my only choice.

                  I hope this helps,

                  CWS

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                  • #10
                    Re: Rigid VS ryobi

                    Charles, I agree that the Ryobi lithiums breathe new life into their cordless tools. Their nicads were a nightmare! Andrew, I can't understand why that 8.25 cordless mitresaw was discontinued? Why doesn't Ridgid make one? What a handy tool for small to moderate trim work. Makes no sense.

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                    • #11
                      Re: Rigid VS ryobi

                      Re: the cordless miter saw; I wonder how many sales they would have at the store. I know they go for a lot on eBay, but that could just be because they are scarce.

                      I think that a 7 1/2" circ saw would be a popular One+ tool.

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                      • #12
                        Re: Rigid VS ryobi

                        I think many have started with the Ryobi system as a beginning point for acquiring their first tools, either corded or cordless, due to price considerations and have since migrated to other manufacturers as money and experience permitted. I do find that the older Ryobi tools perform much better using their new lithium battery platform - 18v grinder, 18v miter saw, 18v laminate trimmer, 18v rotary saw, etc. Even though I've since purchased tools from others, some of those older cordless tools really kick now with more power and run time and I didn't have to buy into yet another manufacturer's battery system to get "like new" tools. Heck, you can't even find a cheap cordless miter saw anymore - picked it up several years ago for $39 when it was almost useless because of the NiCad batteries, but now I realize it was a steal. They're not contractor grade in most instances, but perform well on limited use and application. They won't beat the Ridgid stuff by any means, but they fill in gaps in the present product offering without having to buy into yet another battery system.

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                        • #13
                          Re: Rigid VS ryobi

                          Originally posted by cpw View Post
                          Re: the cordless miter saw; I wonder how many sales they would have at the store. I know they go for a lot on eBay, but that could just be because they are scarce.

                          I think that a 7 1/2" circ saw would be a popular One+ tool.
                          Bosch also has a cordless, 18 volt blu-core battery-operated mitre-saw. While I wouldn't want to use a battery-operated mitre-saw all the time, they do make a good idea for when there is no easy access to corded power, or for quick little cuts for door/window casing, and other small trim jobs (cutting molding for picture frames, etc.).

                          I do think it might make a good idea for Ridgid to make one to work with the 24 volt XLi batteries, or for Bosch/Milwaukee/DeWalt to come up with one to use with their higher-voltage battery options (28 volt, 36 volt, etc.). I'm sure many would buy it, just for the added convenience (just like that stupid battery-operated caulking-gun!)

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                          • #14
                            Re: Rigid VS ryobi

                            Well really this question is like asking if there is a difference between black and decker and DeWalt. I hate both but I have to admit DeWalt is hands down better quality than B&D. B&D and Ryobi are not ment for heavy use, the tools are great if you're like my dad who won't touch them more than ten times a year. Ridgid and DeWalt are more money because they are worth more, they last longer. Just because they are made by the same company doesn't mean anything, look who owns Lamborghini and Bugatti. There's really no comparison between the VW Bug and the MurciƩlago other than they both have four tires touching the ground and you know the basics. A Ryobi drill will put a hole in wood but the Ridgid will get it done faster, the MurciƩlago will get you home sooner , its kind of like that.
                            Last edited by Ru&Lins_05; 12-15-2008, 07:24 PM.

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                            • #15
                              Re: Rigid VS ryobi

                              I know it's a little off topic regarding cordless miter saws, but, due to price and market, Makita just ceased making their cordless miter saw. Bosch continues. Don't know about DeWalt. It's a useful tool - especially if it's inexpensive to acquire, but will chew up batteries if used extensively during a day for cuts other than trim. If I've got it out and set up on the miter saw stand, I'll even cut 2x stock with it, but it's not with a "chop" of the blade - a little more finese is required.

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