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  • Can anybody ID this vintage 1/4" Craftsman?

    http://img.inkfrog.com/click_enlarge...d&aid=90945096

    At about 55 bucks with shipping the spade bits and vise made it kind of a no-brainer purchase since I needed some of those anyway and they're probably as good or better quality than anything you can buy now.

    Given the presence of what looks like the original manual and cardboard box, I believe the seller when they say they don't think it's ever been used and in perfect operating condition (hope it's not a bother to lubricate the thing).

    Can anybody put a year or model number on this thing? The chrome makes me want to place it earlier than the graphics on the box suggest to me. I'm guessing '60s, maybe late '50s as I thought everything was pretty much bakelite by the '70s.

    I hope the trigger has as much play for speed variability as it looks like it does. That's one of the big things I don't like about the current crop of high speed milwaukee drills other than the less than rock-solid side handles. Those triggers are lame.

    I'm guessing it doesn't drill in reverse as I don't see a switch or that particular feature listed anywhere. What do you do when you get it stuck in something? Try to drill in place for a while?

    I need to stay away from e-bay. My fiancee's going to kill me.

  • #2
    Re: Can anybody ID this vintage 1/4" Craftsman?

    No idea, but it sure looks sweet
    West Trail Mechanical Ltd
    Service. Commitment. Expertise.

    www.westtrailmechanical.ca

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    • #3
      Re: Can anybody ID this vintage 1/4" Craftsman?

      Return it to Sears if it dont work, hey its a Craftsman.

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      • #4
        Re: Can anybody ID this vintage 1/4" Craftsman?

        I'd never see it again.

        Or they'd replace it with a modern 3/8" craftsman drill.

        Seller says it works perfectly. Even seemed surprised at how powerful it was.

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        • #5
          Re: Can anybody ID this vintage 1/4" Craftsman?

          I have that same model (or similar) in the shop right now, as a repair for a customer. It's a great old drill with all metal parts (if it is indeed the same model). The one I have for repair needs just new brushes and some clean-up. It actually still works, but is developing some grinding noises and will sometimes stop working. I suspect the brush assemblies and the brushes need to be replaced, but I haven't opened it up yet. Seems like the older Craftsman tools are really built well!
          I put it all back together better than before. There\'s lots of leftover parts.

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          • #6
            Re: Can anybody ID this vintage 1/4" Craftsman?

            Sweet. Is there a model # stamped on yours? I hope the parts are all standard enough to make for easy repairs but if the seller ain't lyin' that may not be necessary. If it is indeed the same, let me know if you need anything from the manual. At least that looks like the manual. I'll have to scan and PDF it for posterity.

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            • #7
              Re: Can anybody ID this vintage 1/4" Craftsman?

              I just threw out a 1/4" Dormeyer that I got for a gift when I was 14. (I'm 62 now)
              Maybe I made a mistake if people are interested in old tools.

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              • #8
                Re: Can anybody ID this vintage 1/4" Craftsman?

                Erik

                Please post info from the nameplate on the drill if you can. I have a very similar one only mine is single speed, ON-OFF but otherwise it's very close to your's.

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                • #9
                  Re: Can anybody ID this vintage 1/4" Craftsman?

                  Originally posted by tierraverde@comcast.net View Post
                  I just threw out a 1/4" Dormeyer that I got for a gift when I was 14. (I'm 62 now)
                  Maybe I made a mistake if people are interested in old tools.
                  Not to seem angry at you but you need a good kick in the @$$$ with a steel toe boot for trashing it. It's too late now but there is big interest in antique-vintage hand and power tools. They are history that needs to be kept around.

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                  • #10
                    Re: Can anybody ID this vintage 1/4" Craftsman?

                    Just got it. And boy is it sweet. Goes through wood like air. Maybe I'm just not familiar with higher RPM drills like this one but I'm impressed. I wish it had reverse but I don't anticipate it getting stuck in anything given its tendency to leave a finely polished bore behind. The chuck seems on par with a Jacobs. Very smooth operating and lightweight.

                    The model No. is 315.11140

                    If it's been used more than a half-dozen times, it HAS been absurdly well cared for. The box is intact, as is the manual.

                    It's not showing up on Google, which excites me. The sears logo is the post '63 one but this model isn't in the Craftsman catalogs up to '64 that I could find (see Rose Antiques for PDFs of old catalogs - they haven't got up to the mid-late '60s scans yet). I don't think it's likely that it's a '70s tool from the style of the box and manual. They have a service guy picture that looks like a '50s milkman uniform. I wouldn't be surprised if it was '65 or just a little bit later.

                    The action on the trigger kicks the crap out of my Milwaukee holeshooter and it makes me wonder how much more cost you would add to a modern tool with a decent spring and more appropriate materials. Not even sure what the trigger is made of. Some kind of hard resin stuff like what they put on a lot of cookware.

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                    • #11
                      Re: Can anybody ID this vintage 1/4" Craftsman?

                      Oh and if it helps you feel better tierra, most vintage power tools still go for pretty cheap on e-bay. The market for hand tools is obnoxiously stronger. I paid more for a similar-vintage Stanlee Yankee screwdriver than this drill. I think I may make something of a hobby out of the power tools. It's fun.

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                      • #12
                        Re: Can anybody ID this vintage 1/4" Craftsman?

                        A Spade bit up to about 5/8" really drills nice in softer woods when running about 2000 RPM and 3/4 - 1" like about 1500 RPM. You can't even get near that with most 3/8" or 1/2" drills which are geared down for higher torque.

                        Sometime I'll do my best to post some wild old timer drill pics of some of my collection on here. I have a real KICK BUTT 1950s Milwaukee 1/4" single speed D handle drill that I worked hard on getting it all fixed up. Now it really drills nice and this thing is BUILT for looooooooong life.

                        Black & Decker used to make awesome industrial power tools back in their day and so did the REAL Porter-Cable before being hogged up by greedy holding corporations.

                        Singer (think industrial sewing machines - not plastic crap) used to make many Craftsman hand held power tools and they were REAL tools. So did SKIL and B&D in their good days.

                        Bottom line: The tool needs to fit the task. There is no such thing as "One Does Most" or "Does It All".
                        Last edited by Woussko; 01-18-2009, 11:56 PM.

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                        • #13
                          Re: Can anybody ID this vintage 1/4" Craftsman?

                          Erik

                          Which model(s) of Milwaukee drill(s) do you have?


                          I wish my old timer friend was still alive that knew how to Brand and Date older Craftsman tools. The model and serial numbers have loads of info coded into them.

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                          • #14
                            Re: Can anybody ID this vintage 1/4" Craftsman?

                            Nothing vintage among the Milwaukees. I got the 1/2" 0234-6 holeshooter based on opinions here and elsewhere and I got the m12 subcompact on a whim that I definitely don't regret. It's become my driver/occasional pilot hole/assembler drill for the house while the cordeds come out mostly for woodworking or tougher jobs. I came across the Craftsman while trying to find a keyed chuck version of the older 3/8" drill Milwaukee still sells (same trigger and body style as the 0234) and I'm glad I did.

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                            • #15
                              Re: Can anybody ID this vintage 1/4" Craftsman?

                              The 3/8" version of a Milwaukee 0234 is a 0224 and has a max no load speed of 1200 RPM. Other than for the chuck (super duty) and gearing changes it's very much like the 0234 which is the old classic. I can't remember the models but they did make a drill some time back very much like your Craftsman which was a single speed 1/4" pistol grip and it was a real gem.

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