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18V lithium 3AH vs 24V lithium Run Time

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  • #61
    Re: 18V lithium 3AH vs 24V lithium Run Time

    Originally posted by DRC-Wartex View Post
    No it wouldn't. Runtime is proportional to energy, and torque is proportional to voltage. If the vac has a DC-DC converter, voltage will be dropped to 18 - same performance. Capacity is lower in 24v batteries and current consumption is higher due to DC-DC conversion, thus lower runtime and same suction.

    Only tools that don't use DC-DC converter will benefit from 24v tools, like drills or impacts. According to numerous posts, it looks like the vacuum is an exception.
    I think the 24V battery is providing more suction. The sound pitch is different than the 18V 3.0AH battery. It is disappointing that the Ridgid specs say the 24V battery should provide 16 minutes of run time when in fact I have tried a total of 4 batteries and have never got more than about 12 to 12 1/2 minutes with each of the batteries. Seems like overly optimistic advertising to me.

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    • #62
      Re: 18V lithium 3AH vs 24V lithium Run Time

      Impact looks to be the same spec wise (x2 was better than the max select to begin with) as well as the drill.





      How was the x2/x3 impact better than the max select?
      x2- 2400 rpm max select- 2100 rpm
      1450 torque 1490 torque
      3100 ipm 3300 ipm

      Unless you meant the 18 volt specs.

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      • #63
        Re: 18V lithium 3AH vs 24V lithium Run Time

        No, the vacuum is not an exception. We've done a bunch of no-load tests on it, and there is a noticeable difference and benefit from the 24 volt XLi's in this tool, similar to the saws and impacts. As I mentioned before, Tennessee, I believe you have faulty 24 volt batts, as you are getting in the neighbourhood of what would be correct for the 18 volts, but no where near what you should get with the 24 volts.

        Return/swap out your 24 volt batteries, and/or get them warranty serviced, whichever is most applicable to you.

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        • #64
          Re: 18V lithium 3AH vs 24V lithium Run Time

          Originally posted by pesciwasp View Post
          Impact looks to be the same spec wise (x2 was better than the max select to begin with) as well as the drill.





          How was the x2/x3 impact better than the max select?
          x2- 2400 rpm max select- 2100 rpm
          1450 torque 1490 torque
          3100 ipm 3300 ipm

          Unless you meant the 18 volt specs.
          I was mainly referring to the rpm's. Everyone's complaint about the maxselect impact was the speed at which it drove fastners. I understand that an impact doesn't rely on rpm only but in most applications it will play a big role.

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          • #65
            Re: 18V lithium 3AH vs 24V lithium Run Time

            Originally posted by Ru&Lins_05 View Post
            I was mainly referring to the rpm's. Everyone's complaint about the maxselect impact was the speed at which it drove fastners. I understand that an impact doesn't rely on rpm only but in most applications it will play a big role.
            So which of the three specs, ipm, rpm, or torque has the most impact ( pardon the pun! ) on driving a screw in faster? Rpm is the only number higher of the three by 300 per min.

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            • #66
              Re: 18V lithium 3AH vs 24V lithium Run Time

              Originally posted by pesciwasp View Post
              So which of the three specs, ipm, rpm, or torque has the most impact ( pardon the pun! ) on driving a screw in faster? Rpm is the only number higher of the three by 300 per min.
              Pesiwasp,

              I kinda look at the impact like I do the recip saw. The new X3 recip saw has 3,000+ strokes per minute, but probably (don't know for sure) on a stroke length of 7/8", whereas the MaxSelect is 2,500 strokes per minute with a 1 3/16" stroke length. It's easy to see the difference between the two approaches. I can't do that with the impacts because I know the number of impacts, but I don't know if they "hit" with the same force or not. What's your take?

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              • #67
                Re: 18V lithium 3AH vs 24V lithium Run Time

                Originally posted by pesciwasp View Post
                So which of the three specs, ipm, rpm, or torque has the most impact ( pardon the pun! ) on driving a screw in faster? Rpm is the only number higher of the three by 300 per min.
                Basically, what you're looking for is the combination of these numbers.

                Torque is great - it's what let's me know the "max" amount of force that I can put on a particular fastener (ie - if I can use 3" lag bolts that are either 3/8" in diameter, or if I need to step down to 1/4", or if I can step up to 1/2"). There's no clear cut mathematical equation that I can give you here for this - it's just a "gut feeling" type of thing, where I know the minimum torque that I want for what I'm using my impact for.

                For the RPM's and the impacts-per-minutes, it's the combination of both. For this situation, the X3 has 2400 rpm and 3100 ipm; the MaxSelect has 2100 rpm and 3300 ipm. Basically, ipm are nice, but it's the rpm's that do the most of the work, at least until you're nearing the end of seating your fastener/screw. If one will work 12.5% faster (as in the case of the X3 over the MaxSelect), then when I'm able to move the fastener/screw and get 70-90% of the rotation work done faster, I end up being ahead, even though it may take a little bit longer for it to do the really hard work right at the end when there is the most resistance.

                Basically, as long as your torque resistance isn't overpowering the maximum that your impact driver can put out (which depends on your fastener size/length, and material being fastened into), then it's nicer to have a faster gun. The X3 has 1.29 impacts per rotation, while the MaxSelect has 1.57. If the resistance isn't overpowering your gun, then the extra impacts per rotation isn't as much of an advantage, compared to having the extra RPMs to get the job done faster. So, don't overload the tool, and the RPMs are nicer. If you are doing maximum work all the time (ie - big 1/2" lag bolts, and/or 3 inch screws all the time), then the additional impacts just let your driver get it done with less fatigue and wear-and-tear on the tool, and thus less drain on the battery.

                Hope this helps - hope my layman's explaination didn't kerfluffle this whole example up.

                And, that all being said, I still chose the MaxSelect impact over the 18 volt impact, the X2 impact, or the X3. I just thought the MaxSelect looked purdier - it matched better with all my other MaxSelect tools.
                Last edited by canucksartech; 03-02-2009, 10:56 PM.

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                • #68
                  Re: 18V lithium 3AH vs 24V lithium Run Time

                  Originally posted by canucksartech View Post
                  Basically, what you're looking for is the combination of these numbers.

                  Torque is great - it's what let's me know the "max" amount of force that I can put on a particular fastener (ie - if I can use 3" lag bolts that are either 3/8" in diameter, or if I need to step down to 1/4", or if I can step up to 1/2"). There's no clear cut mathematical equation that I can give you here for this - it's just a "gut feeling" type of thing, where I know the minimum torque that I want for what I'm using my impact for.

                  For the RPM's and the impacts-per-minutes, it's the combination of both. For this situation, the X3 has 2400 rpm and 3100 ipm; the MaxSelect has 2100 rpm and 3300 ipm. Basically, ipm are nice, but it's the rpm's that do the most of the work, at least until you're nearing the end of seating your fastener/screw. If one will work 12.5% faster (as in the case of the X3 over the MaxSelect), then when I'm able to move the fastener/screw and get 70-90% of the rotation work done faster, I end up being ahead, even though it may take a little bit longer for it to do the really hard work right at the end when there is the most resistance.

                  Basically, as long as your torque resistance isn't overpowering the maximum that your impact driver can put out (which depends on your fastener size/length, and material being fastened into), then it's nicer to have a faster gun. The X3 has 1.29 impacts per rotation, while the MaxSelect has 1.57. If the resistance isn't overpowering your gun, then the extra impacts per rotation isn't as much of an advantage, compared to having the extra RPMs to get the job done faster. So, don't overload the tool, and the RPMs are nicer. If you are doing maximum work all the time (ie - big 1/2" lag bolts, and/or 3 inch screws all the time), then the additional impacts just let your driver get it done with less fatigue and wear-and-tear on the tool, and thus less drain on the battery.

                  Hope this helps - hope my layman's explaination didn't kerfluffle this whole example up.

                  And, that all being said, I still chose the MaxSelect impact over the 18 volt impact, the X2 impact, or the X3. I just thought the MaxSelect looked purdier - it matched better with all my other MaxSelect tools.
                  I picked max impact as well, its the only one that sells solo!!!! Makes no sense not to sell most tools solo as well as in combos. There will be a massive landfill with auto shift drivers and flashlights, very soon!!

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                  • #69
                    Re: 18V lithium 3AH vs 24V lithium Run Time

                    I don't think 'impacts per rotation' have anything to do with the performance of the tool.

                    The faster the speed of the tool, the faster it will seat a bolt/screw assuming there is little resistance. It will depend on how powerful the motor is, as to when the tool will stop rotating; this is some information that they don't give you. It is not until the tool stops rotating that the impacts start to act on the bolt/screw. Thus the rpms and ipm are completely separate items.

                    I believe measured torque for an impact driver is measured differently than that of a conventional drill, and is not a direct reading off the tool. I think the torque is measured as the effective torque the tool can apply to a 'standard' fastener (the standard being different for every manufacturer to make it really difficult to make a real comparision). In very basic terms, if you use the tool to seat a bolt, then use a torque wrench to remove it, the torque should be similar to the rated torque of the tool. For tools with the same torque rating, the higher the ipm rating of the tool, the faster the tool will seat the fastener. If both torque and ipm are higher, the tool should be 'better'. If only one is higher, then it is not as simple to compare the tools (one could put more torque on the fastener, but take longer to do it).

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