Announcement Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.
BS 14002 Vibration no more Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • BS 14002 Vibration no more

    SWEET SUCCESS!!!!

    After much frustration, I have finally managed to eliminate virtually all vibration from my BS 14002.

    I’ve noticed on this forum that this appears to be a common complaint concerning this unit so I thought I would post what I did to correct this problem. I’ve also attached pictures showing what I did as well as the final result, PASSING the “STAND A NICKEL ON EDGE WHILE THE MACHINE IS RUNNING” test!!!

    Before getting into the how, let me preface by saying that in general, I’ve been very pleased with my Ridgid power equipment which consists of a TS 3650, JP 06101, EB 44241 and a TP 13002. All of these units were easy to assemble and accurate right out of the box. This is why I elected to purchase a Ridgid BS 14002. As it turned out, the BS 14002 was a nightmare in that the vibration was totally unacceptable. When started, the vibration was so bad that the machine acted like it was going to walk out of my garage!

    Now, for the rest of the story.

    In order to address this issue, I first took stock of all items I thought could be causing this problem. I ended up identifying the following;

    1- Alignment issues
    2- Loose mounting hardware or components
    3- Broken or bent hardware or components
    4- Cheap or damaged belt.
    5- Bad bearing(s)
    6- Bent lower wheel shaft
    7- Out of balance components (upper and lower wheels, driven pulley)

    I examined each item in the order stated above.

    1- I verified the alignment of the motor pulley and driven pulley using a 4 foot level. Alignment was noted to be within 1/32”. I did not believe that 1/32” should have created this kind if problem. I also checked the alignment of the upper and lower wheels in relation to each other. I found the two wheels would not align properly. In order to correct this, I shimmed out the lower wheel approximately 1/8”.
    2- Examined the entire saw to ensure that there was no loose mounting hardware. None was found.
    3- Examined the entire saw looking for bent or broken hardware or components. None was found.
    4- Examined the belt. It was the stock belt that came with the saw. I don’t know where Ridgid get these but they should consider a new supplier. The belt had a definite deformation (twist) to it that I could not correct. However, after examining it in operation, I did not believe that the noted twist was of sufficient caliber to cause the degree of vibration I was experiencing. I made note of this for future evaluation.
    5- Checked for bad bearings. To do this I got out my mechanics stethoscope and listened to the bearings as I turned the wheels and motor. Again, no problems were noted.
    6- Next, I checked the lower wheel shaft. I did this using a dial indicator on the driven pulley. I found a misalignment of .025”. This got me wondering if the problem was with the wheel shaft or with the pulley itself. I removed the pulley and checked the shaft, it was true to within less than .001”. This meant the pulley shaft bore and outside of the pulley was not concentric. This is significant. This item was noted and I decided to complete the last step. Glad I did!!!
    7- I did a simple check of the balance of both the upper and lower wheels. Upper wheel – I simply gave the wheel a spin. I waited for it to come to a complete stop and used a marker to place a mark at the bottom of the wheel. I repeated this process several times. Each time the wheel stopped at the same location (within ± 1”). This identified that the upper wheel was out of balance and by placing the marks, I now I knew where the heavy side was. I set about trying to balance the wheel by drilling out metal on the heavy side. I removed a great deal of metal but didn’t seem to be making any progress. So the next thing I tried was taking a grinder and grinding out metal. I would not recommend this course of action. After thinking about it for a while, I decided that adding weight to the light side would be a more appropriate action. As I pondered how I was going to add weight, I went ahead and checked the lower wheel using the same process (If you do this, don’t forget to remove the wheel brush). Same results, the lower wheel was significantly out of balance as well. I switched on the motor while everything was disconnected, it ran perfectly, no vibration.

    I did this on a Sunday afternoon. Anyone who lives in or has visited Utah on a Sunday would understand my dilemma…very little is open What I needed was stick-on tire weights. Not being able to locate what I needed, I decided to make my own. I did this by melting down fishing weights and forming a small lead ingot approximately 3/8” wide, 4” long and about 1/8” thick. When the ingot cooled, I used a chisel to cut it into approximately 5/16” lengths. Then using double sided tape, I attached them to the light side of both the upper and lower wheels. Don’t be afraid to add to much weight, lead is a soft material that can easily be trimmed back until you have just the right mount. Then I removed the motor and placed washers on both sides of the “vibration dampeners”. This prevented the dampeners from setting into the slots on the motor and base and compresses them evenly. Additionally, it allows the motor to slide making it much easier to tension the new drive belt. Next, I ordered a new driven pulley from Grizzly and purchased a Power Twist Plus belt and new tires from WoodCraft. If I recall correctly, I had to remove 11 links from the new 4’ belt to make the belt the correct length. The combination of the new pulley, belt as well as the balancing of the upper and lower wheels has reduced the vibration to virtually nil. The photos below show what I did to alleviate the vibration problem as well as showing a nickel standing on end as the saw is running. If you look closely, in some of the pictures showing the nickel standing on end you can see the new drive belt. You’ll notice the belt is slightly blurred, this is due to the fact that the machine was running when the picture was taken!

    Finally, if your in a small shop or work out of your garage and need to move you BS 14002 around, I mounted casters that BadgerDave identified in a previous post to my saw. They work perfectly. Got them at WoodCraft.

    I hope this information helps others with similar problems. If you use any of these techniques, please be cautious as they will require you to operate the machine with the belt guard removed and the wheel covers open.

    I hope someone from Ridgid is monitoring this forum and takes this information back to their Engineering and Quality Control departments. It's a shame to purchase a new piece of equipment and have to trouble shoot it right out of the box.
    Attached Files

  • #2
    Re: BS 14002 Vibration no more

    Originally posted by krich View Post
    ........... It's a shame to purchase a new piece of equipment and have to trouble shoot it right out of the box.
    Amen to that brother!
    Teach your kids about taxes..........eat 30 percent of their ice cream.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: BS 14002 Vibration no more

      Great job!! Im going to use this thread as a reference to check out my Delta 14" bandsaw. Im sure all the same science applies!!

      A quick question, though - is there any spec diagram on those woodcraft retractable casters? Im curious if they would fit the stand that came with my bandsaw, but I cant find any measurements on them to have an idea (and there is no local enough Woodcraft to me).

      Thanks in advance.

      -Chris

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: BS 14002 Vibration no more

        Originally posted by chrisexv6 View Post
        Great job!! Im going to use this thread as a reference to check out my Delta 14" bandsaw. Im sure all the same science applies!!

        A quick question, though - is there any spec diagram on those woodcraft retractable casters? Im curious if they would fit the stand that came with my bandsaw, but I cant find any measurements on them to have an idea (and there is no local enough Woodcraft to me).

        Thanks in advance.

        -Chris
        There's no diagram that I'm aware of. I'll take a couple of measurements and post them when I get a chance. May be a couple of day's before I can get to it though.

        Comment

        Working...
        X